The Royal Forums Coat of Arms

Go Back   The Royal Forums > Royal Highlights > Royal Library

Join The Royal Forums Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
  #81  
Old 04-10-2013, 10:31 AM
Warren's Avatar
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 15,425
"Blood Sisters: The Women Behind the Wars of the Roses"
by Sarah Gristwood

ISBN-10: 0465018319
ISBN-13: 9780465018314
Published: Basic Books, September 2012
Pages: 384

Amazon UK
How the Wars of the Roses were won and lost by the political and dynastic skills of the royal women: this is the true story behind Philippa Gregory’s dramatic novels about fiery Queens and the perils of power.
The events of the Wars of the Roses are usually described in terms of the men involved: Richard Duke of York, Henry VI, Edward IV, Richard III and Henry VII. The reality though, argues acclaimed author Sarah Gristwood, was quite different. These years were also packed with women’s drama and – in the tales of conflicted maternity and monstrous births – alive with female energy.

In this completely original book, Sarah Gristwood sheds light on a neglected dimension of English history: the impact of Tudor women on the Wars of the Roses. She examines, among others, Cecily Neville, the wife of Richard Duke of York, who was deprived of being queen when her husband died at the Battle of Wakefield; Elizabeth Woodville, a widow with several children who married Edward IV in secret and was crowned queen consort; Margaret Beaufort, mother of Henry VII, whose ambitions centred on her son and whose persuasions are likely to have lead her husband Lord Stanley, previously allied with the Yorkists, to play his part in Henry's victory.

Until now, the lives of these women have remained little known to the general public. Sarah Gristwood tells their stories in detail for the first time. Captivating and original, this is historical writing of the most important kind.

Amazon.com
To contemporaries, the Wars of the Roses were known collectively as a “cousins’ war.” The series of dynastic conflicts that tore apart the ruling Plantagenet family in fifteenth-century England was truly a domestic drama, as fraught and intimate as any family feud before or since.

As acclaimed historian Sarah Gristwood reveals in Blood Sisters, while the events of this turbulent time are usually described in terms of the male leads who fought and died seeking the throne, a handful of powerful women would prove just as decisive as their kinfolks’ clashing armies. These mothers, wives, and daughters were locked in a web of loyalty and betrayal that would ultimately change the course of English history. In a captivating, multigenerational narrative, Gristwood traces the rise and rule of the seven most critical women in the wars: from Marguerite of Anjou, wife of the Lancastrian Henry VI, who steered the kingdom in her insane husband’s stead; to Cecily Neville, matriarch of the rival Yorkist clan, whose son Edward IV murdered his own brother to maintain power; to Margaret Beaufort, who gave up her own claim to the throne in favor of her son, a man who would become the first of a new line of Tudor kings.

A richly drawn, absorbing epic, Blood Sisters is a tale of hopeful births alongside bloody deaths, of romance as well as brutal pragmatism. It is a story of how women, and the power that women could wield, helped to end the Wars of the Roses, paving the way for the Tudor age—and the creation of modern England.

PublishersWeekly
Gristwood, a British journalist and biographer, provides a fresh take on the Wars of the Roses, a 30-year tug-of-war between two feuding dynasties, the houses of Lancaster and York, over the crown of England. The conflict officially ended with the accession of Henry VII in 1485, and it’s a story that has been hashed and rehashed by historians for centuries. But while most accounts focus upon battles fought and constantly shifting alliances between kings and noblemen, Gristwood (Arabella: England’s Lost Queen) adds another layer to the story: the essential roles played by the chief combatants’ mothers, sisters, daughters, and wives. Focusing on seven key women, from Marguerite of Anjou, Henry VI’s queen (who fought much more mightily than he to hold onto the throne), to Elizabeth of York, whose marriage to Henry VII in 1486 united the two houses, Gristwood has written a compelling narrative of what went on behind the scenes and away from the battlefields. Despite occasional confusion arising from the plethora of characters with common names, this is an engaging, well written, and thoroughly-researched page turner that should delight academics as much as fans of Philippa Gregory’s historical novels about several of the same notable women.

cincybookshelf
Praise for Blood Sisters: The Women Behind the Wars of the Roses…

Sunday Times
(London)

“Most of the leading players in the Wars of the Roses have traditionally been thought to be the men. Historian Sarah Gristwood… stands this on its head. She examines seven women, whose lives were bound together across the best part of a century, and tries to see the wars from their points of view…. Gristwood successfully evokes the lives of all these women, and in doing so brings a new and welcome perspective on the Wars of the Roses.”

Literary Review
“Entertaining and vividly drawn…. This is the true story of the most important women of the period, their travails and suffering; but also of the links between them, their friendships and ambitions, their cooperation, their courage and pragmatism. It is a different way of looking at this complex period, and Gristwood weaves the story with considerable skill. The battles and bloodshed that led to the loss of so many of the old nobility of England form a backdrop to the narrative, but the real emphasis is on half-a-dozen women whose extraordinary experiences of triumph and disaster, often in a bewilderingly short period of time, brought them to the edge of despair but did not, in the end, lessen their commitment to their families. They provided continuity as the world fell apart around them…. Gristwood is to be congratulated for her highly readable account of their lives”

About the author
Biographer and journalist Sarah Gristwood attended Oxford University and is a regular contributor to the London Times, Guardian, Independent, and Evening Standard. The author of seven previous books, including the best-selling Arbella: England’s Lost Queen and Elizabeth and Leicester: Power, Passion, Politics.

v cover
Reproduced for promotional purposes
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Blood Sisters.jpg
Views:	52
Size:	19.8 KB
ID:	288618  
__________________

__________________
Seeking information? Check out the extensive Royal A-Z
Reply With Quote
  #82  
Old 04-10-2013, 10:32 AM
Warren's Avatar
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 15,425
thestar.com
By: Linda Diebel Canada
Biographer Sarah Gristwood leaves no doubt of her intent in the prologue to Blood Sisters: The Women Behind the Wars of the Roses. It is, she says about the cunning and courage of seven women who “created a new English dynasty” between 1445 and the early 16th century.

Hers is a revolutionary approach. For too long, history has been the purview of men, of kings and their battles, wars, conquests, murders and thirst for power. Exceptions reinforce the rule, as in the lives of the six women wed to Henry VIII whose fates depended on their ability to produce a male heir for their lord and king.

Gristwood’s perspective and lively writing are refreshing. She proclaims that to ignore the role of women is to “treat history as disaster tourism” — writing that deals so exclusively with “the roller-coaster ride as to get only a distorted picture” of what really shaped events. A singular chronicling of battles strips any sense of daily life and overlooks the influence of fiery women in determining victors in the game of thrones.

Gristwood’s book offers something I particularly value: good footnotes, an extensive bibliography and a comprehensive index, aspects that modern publishers too often treat cavalierly. Author of the bestselling Arabella: England’s Lost Queen and Elizabeth and Leicester: Power, Passion and Politics, her research is impeccable.

Certainly there have been individual biographies of each of these seven powerful women but by tracing the connections among them, Gristwood digs into motives and aspirations of royals too long overlooked. Women were the interconnective tissue between the white rose of the House of York and red rose of the Lancastrians, families who fought the War of the Roses (also known as the Cousins’ War) between 1455 and 1487. Through them, she gives us an unconventional history of the wars between relations, arguing that their actions mattered as much as battles, and certainly played a significant role in ending the war and establishing the peace.

These women should be legends. They bore grievous betrayal and loss yet remained resilient. Marguerite of Anjou arrived from France as a seasick 15-year-old and eventually ruled England in the place of her insane Lancastrian husband, Henry VI. The beautiful Cecily Neville’s Yorkist son Edward IV executed his own brother to protect the crown. Elizabeth of York waited during the Battle of Bosworh in 1485 to learn whether her future lay with Richard III, whom she loved, or the warrior, Henry Tudor. Richard became the last king to die in battle in England, and his remains were found only recently under a parking lot in Leicester. A new chapter is being written about events that occurred 500 years ago, sparking new interest in his life and era. Elizabeth became the York prize who united the houses with her marriage to the Lancastrian victor crowned Henry VII, the first monarch of the House of Tudor.

These women played critical roles at a time when women were increasingly moving into lives of quiet domesticity. Troubadours and excessive gallantry masked their treatment as chattels. But these women laid the ground for Elizabeth I, the “Virgin Queen,” whose deeds a century later would inspire a nation. She rallied her troops to battle with the cry she had the body of “a weak and feeble woman” but the “heart and stomach of a king.”

Gristwood considers these seven women the midwives and wives of the Tudor dynasty — indeed, of modern England.
.
__________________

__________________
Seeking information? Check out the extensive Royal A-Z
Reply With Quote
  #83  
Old 04-11-2013, 08:54 PM
LauraS3514's Avatar
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: San Jose, CA, United States
Posts: 227
Quote:
Originally Posted by Warren View Post
thestar.com
By: Linda Diebel Canada
Biographer Sarah Gristwood leaves no doubt of her intent in the prologue to Blood Sisters: The Women Behind the Wars of the Roses. It is, she says about the cunning and courage of seven women who “created a new English dynasty” between 1445 and the early 16th century. (Snip)

Elizabeth of York waited during the Battle of Bosworh in 1485 to learn whether her future lay with Richard III, whom she loved, or the warrior, Henry Tudor. Richard became the last king to die in battle in England, and his remains were found only recently under a parking lot in Leicester. A new chapter is being written about events that occurred 500 years ago, sparking new interest in his life and era. Elizabeth became the York prize who united the houses with her marriage to the Lancastrian victor crowned Henry VII, the first monarch of the House of Tudor.
.
Arrgh Not this again. Documents in both England and Portugal show that King Richard was planning to marry Princess Joanna of Portugal (sister of John II) and Elizabeth of York was to marry Joanna's cousin who unexpectedly later became King Manuel I. Bosworth happened before the marriages could take place. I could go on and say that Richard has been called many things, but stupid wasn't one of them, and it would have been extremely stupid for him to have contemplated marriage to his illegitimate niece, but that would seem to be obvious.

Oh, and Henry Tyddr was no warrior and never claimed to be. He was hiding er observing from behind a tree behind his bodyguards and his French mercenaries when Richard, who WAS a warrior, came within three feet of him before being cut down. That's in the records too.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #84  
Old 04-13-2013, 11:19 AM
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 203
"The Creation of Anne Boleyn" by Susan Bordo (2013)

"The Creation of Anne Boleyn" by Susan Bordo (2013)

Excellent new book about Anne Boleyn and her evolution in popular culture

The Tudor Book Reviews 11: The Creation of Anne Boleyn: A New Look At England’s Most Notorious Queen by Susan Bordo | Carolyn Harris: Royal Historian
.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #85  
Old 04-13-2013, 12:05 PM
Baroness of Books's Avatar
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Bookstacks, United States
Posts: 5,772
I was processing new books the other day and had it in my hands. It looks like an interesting read, so I put it on hold. Can't wait for my copy.
__________________
A book should be either a bandit or a rebel or a man in the crowd..... D.H. Lawrence
Reply With Quote
  #86  
Old 04-13-2013, 08:18 PM
XeniaCasaraghi's Avatar
Heir Presumptive
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: 1729 Noneofyourbusiness Drive, United States
Posts: 2,351
Oh oh it's out already? I think I really want to read it, it's more about her representation in books and movies and not her life.
__________________
Princess Grace, April 19, 1956
Princess Margaret Rose, May 6, 1960
Crown Princess Mette-Marit, August 25, 2001
Jaqueline Bouvier Kennedy, September 12, 1953
Countess Stephanie of Belgium October 20, 2012
Reply With Quote
  #87  
Old 04-14-2013, 11:23 AM
Warren's Avatar
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 15,425
"The Creation of Anne Boleyn
A New Look at England's Most Notorious Queen
"
by Susan Bordo

Publisher:Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Published: April 2013
ISBN: 0547328184
Hardcover, 368 pages

Publisher's Blurb
Part biography, part cultural history, The Creation of Anne Boleyn is a fascinating reconstruction of Anne’s life and an illuminating look at her afterlife in the popular imagination. Why is Anne so compelling? Why has she inspired such extreme reactions? What did she really look like? Was she the flaxen-haired martyr of Romantic paintings or the raven-haired seductress of twenty-first-century portrayals? (Answer: neither.) And perhaps the most provocative questions concern Anne’s death more than her life. How could Henry order the execution of a once beloved wife? Drawing on scholarship and critical analysis, Bordo probes the complexities of one of history’s most infamous relationships.

Bordo also shows how generations of polemicists, biographers, novelists, and filmmakers imagined and re-imagined Anne: whore, martyr, cautionary tale, proto “mean girl,” feminist icon, and everything in between. In this lively book, Bordo steps off the well-trodden paths of Tudoriana to expertly tease out the human being behind the competing mythologies.

Kirkus review
A dissection of the many varying portrayals of Anne Boleyn (1501–1536) since her death.
Bordo (Humanities/Univ. of Kentucky; The Male Body: A New Look at Men in Public and Private, 1999, etc.) begins her study of Boleyn through the ages with the attempted eradication of the doomed queen’s presence from Henry VIII’s castle and life. It was with this erasure, writes the author, that Boleyn ceased to exist as a person and became a character known only through the lenses of others. The chief contemporary accounts of her time at court come from a diplomat and supporter of Boleyn’s predecessor, Katherine of Aragon. The portrait is that of a villain, which Bordo thinks is unfair and probably historically inaccurate due to the biases of the sources. The author examines many of the histories and fictions that make Boleyn their subject, from early biographies to novels, plays and TV shows.

While she makes a compelling case for her assertion that Boleyn was a strong and independent victim of the times rather than a bloodthirsty and power-mad vixen, Bordo’s own biases are apparent. She portrays the former queen not as simply misunderstood but as a feminist hero for the ages. The angle won’t surprise those familiar with her other works, but occasionally the book feels less like history than sociological theory. While the obvious discontent with many Boleyn accounts is a main focus of the book, one consequence of all the attention given those works is the likelihood that readers who are not well-versed in the lore will become curious about all the stories, including the negative.

A great read for Boleyn fans and fanatics alike, though not for readers seeking a general biography of the queen.

Confessions of a Ci-Devant
excerpts
More nonsense has been written about Anne Boleyn than almost any other personality in British history. The six-fingered witch of Counter-Reformation propaganda was the most extreme re-imagining of Henry VIII's second wife, but the most enduring trope is that of an unpleasant, morally-dubious social climber who trampled on anyone who got in her way and who lied, bullied and manipulated her way onto the consort's throne. There is a pervasive view in modern literature and history that holds that although Anne Boleyn probably was not guilty of the crimes for which she perished in 1536, she nonetheless basically deserved her eventual fate. To paraphrase a popular television show, Anne played the game of thrones - and lost.

The problem with that view of Anne Boleyn is not only that it's factually inaccurate, but that it's also the intellectual brainchild of five hundred years of misogyny. Anne Boleyn may have played the political game like a man, but she perished as a woman. She was not dragged off her pedestal by political or financial allegations, but rather her enemies eviscerated her on the grounds of her gender. They played, shamelessly, to the worst kinds of paranoia about what women would do if they had power. At Anne's trial, lurid details of her alleged seduction of her brother, Lord Rochford, and her libidinous sexual approaches to other members of the royal court were included in the indictments - right the way down to a description of how she had used French kissing to inflame her brother into committing incest with her. It was character assassination in its basest form, intended to annihilate Anne's reputation.

...In her new book The Creation of Anne Boleyn, academic Susan Bordo sets out to explore how and why Anne Boleyn's reputation has been shaped. Anne's story has inspired operas, plays, novels, television dramas and movies. She is a modern day industry in her own right; by far and away the most memorable of Henry's half-dozen wives, as Bordo wryly notes in her descriptions of Tudor fans' attempts to impose a kind of equality of interest on all six, despite the fact that all six are not equally interesting. And certainly not all equally important.

...Bordo is an expert on the academic politics of feminism and she goes to town on the allegedly "feminist" presentation of Anne in The Other Boleyn Girl (to date, a book that spawned a television drama that spawned a motion picture that spawned a thousand stupid questions).

...This is a book that takes pop culture seriously and in doing so produces an utterly fascinating view of how historical reputations are shaped and made.

...from somewhere, the myth grew that Mary was the most beautiful of Thomas Boleyn's two daughters. Gaining validity by no surer virtue than that endowed by repetition, the story of "Mary Boleyn's prettiness" is a reminder of the power that oft-repeated but unverifiable myths have on our perceptions of the past.

v cover
Reproduced for promotional purposes.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Anne Boleyn.jpg
Views:	51
Size:	54.8 KB
ID:	288667  
__________________
Seeking information? Check out the extensive Royal A-Z
Reply With Quote
  #88  
Old 04-14-2013, 11:39 AM
Warren's Avatar
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 15,425
Sound familiar?

Members with an understanding of blog/message board dynamics may find the following has some resonance...

wordpress.com
excerpt
This excerpt from Bordo’s book discusses “Viral Anne”–the Websites and Facebook pages devoted to Boleyn and/or The Tudors.

[Not everyone was a fan of Anne Boleyn. The woman who] started The Anne Boleyn Files in 2009, encountered a good deal of hatred of Anne and by extension, her site: “Being someone who runs an Anne Boleyn site has left me open to abuse, offensive emails, and even death threats because I dare to defend a woman who for some really is the ‘scandal of Christendom.’” Either encouraged or angered by The Tudors’ tendency to sanctify Katherine and Jane Seymour, “Team Boleyn” members and “Team Aragon/Team Seymour” members became mean, squabbling girls themselves.

...one of the first moderators of the Tudors Wiki was struck by “fierce loyalties” that arose among the members of the Katherine of Aragon and Anne Boleyn “camps.” “It never ceased to amaze me,” she recalls, “how strongly these women felt about something that happened over 400 years ago.” [Another moderator] who joined the Wiki in 2008 while she was studying for a master’s degree in history, remembers these battles as proving the truth of the comment made by sportswriter Clay Travis that “the dark corners of the internet message board made talk radio seem like a mid-day stroll in a well-kept garden.” [Posters], encouraged by the obscurity of internet conversations, didn’t hold back on slinging mud at each other, and for the moderators of the site, it became a “challenge maintaining the line between constructive criticism and negative character bashing.”


.
__________________
Seeking information? Check out the extensive Royal A-Z
Reply With Quote
  #89  
Old 04-20-2013, 11:13 PM
XeniaCasaraghi's Avatar
Heir Presumptive
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: 1729 Noneofyourbusiness Drive, United States
Posts: 2,351
I have no will power. I brought the book, I can't even bear to type how much money I spent.
__________________
Princess Grace, April 19, 1956
Princess Margaret Rose, May 6, 1960
Crown Princess Mette-Marit, August 25, 2001
Jaqueline Bouvier Kennedy, September 12, 1953
Countess Stephanie of Belgium October 20, 2012
Reply With Quote
  #90  
Old 04-22-2013, 01:11 PM
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 203
"Elizabeth of York: The Forgotten Tudor Queen" by Amy Licence

"Elizabeth of York: The Forgotten Tudor Queen" by Amy Licence

The most recent biography of Elizabeth of York, the least known Tudor Queen

The Tudor Book Reviews 12: Elizabeth of York: The Forgotten Tudor Queen by Amy Licence | Carolyn Harris: Royal Historian
.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #91  
Old 07-01-2013, 10:15 PM
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 203
"The Gothic King: A Biography of Henry III" by John Paul Davis

The 1st popular biography since the 19th century of one of England's most obscure monarchs.

The Medieval Book Reviews 8: The Gothic King: A Biography of Henry III by John Paul Davis | Carolyn Harris: Royal Historian
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #92  
Old 07-02-2013, 07:13 AM
ukchrisuk's Avatar
Commoner
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Wouldham, United Kingdom
Posts: 16
Henry VII- a concise history of the 1st Tudor King

Hi, I have just written a concise history about Henry VII and histenuous claim to the throne leading to the Tudor dynasty which ruled for 118 years. It is only 1400 words long so it should not take to long to read. You can find the link here King Henry VII
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #93  
Old 07-02-2013, 11:34 AM
An Ard Ri's Avatar
Super Moderator
Royal Blogger
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Westmeath, Ireland
Posts: 9,511
Its hard to believe that there's so little written about Henry III given the lenght of his reign,I will look out for this biography!
__________________
November 2nd, 1938-Birth of H.M.Queen Sofia of Spain
Reply With Quote
  #94  
Old 08-06-2013, 01:07 PM
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 203
"Elizabeth's Bedfellows" by Anna Whitelock [Elizabeth I]

A Look at Elizabeth I through the eyes of her ladies-in-waiting who guarded the Queen's reputation and slept in her bedchamber

Elizabeth’s Bedfellows: An Intimate History of the Queen’s Court by Anna Whitelock (Review) | Carolyn Harris: Royal Historian
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #95  
Old 10-04-2013, 06:37 PM
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 203
"Elfrida: The First Crowned Queen of England" by Elizabeth Norton

An interesting biography of a little known queen who was a key figure in the 10th century (and a thousand year old murder mystery!)

Elfrida: The First Crowned Queen of England by Elizabeth Norton (Review) | Carolyn Harris: Royal Historian

v cover
reproduced for promotional purposes
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Elfrida.jpg
Views:	26
Size:	199.8 KB
ID:	290976  
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #96  
Old 10-18-2013, 05:51 AM
An Ard Ri's Avatar
Super Moderator
Royal Blogger
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Westmeath, Ireland
Posts: 9,511
The Search for Richard III

The Search for Richard III

By Philippa Langley and Michael Jones.

BBC News - Richard III hunter co-authors book on car park King

The search for Richard III by Philippa Langley and Michael Jones - review | Books | Entertainment | Daily Express
__________________
November 2nd, 1938-Birth of H.M.Queen Sofia of Spain
Reply With Quote
  #97  
Old 11-14-2013, 05:43 PM
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 203
Edward the Confessor by Peter Rex

Enjoyable read with plenty of info about Edward the Confessor's policies, piety and what he probably thought of his cousin William the Conqueror and his wife, Edith

Edward the Confessor: King of England by Peter Rex (Review) | Carolyn Harris: Royal Historian
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #98  
Old 11-17-2013, 07:20 AM
An Ard Ri's Avatar
Super Moderator
Royal Blogger
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Westmeath, Ireland
Posts: 9,511
Amazon review score : 2 out of 5

Edward the Confessor: King of England: Amazon.co.uk: Peter Rex: Books
__________________
November 2nd, 1938-Birth of H.M.Queen Sofia of Spain
Reply With Quote
  #99  
Old 11-17-2013, 11:12 AM
AdmirerUS's Avatar
Heir Presumptive
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Midwest, United States
Posts: 2,724
Sadly, the first Amazon reviewer castigates the book because he/she did not understand all the words used and had to look words up in references.
Fine way to judge a book - by the shallowness of it's vocabulary.

Good Reads gave it 4 stars: King & Saint: The Life of Edward the Confessor by Peter Rex

Carolyn Harris points out what it does well: Edward the Confessor: King of England by Peter Rex (Review) | Carolyn Harris: Royal Historian
__________________
“For is there any practice less selfish, any labor less alienated, any time less wasted, than preparing something delicious and nourishing for people you love." Michael Pollan, Cooked
Reply With Quote
  #100  
Old 11-19-2013, 01:13 PM
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 203
The Boleyn Women by Elizabeth Norton

The full Boleyn extended family including the divided loyalties of Anne Boleyn's aunts, cousins and sister-in-law

The Boleyn Women by Elizabeth Norton (Review) | Carolyn Harris: Royal Historian
__________________

__________________
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
biography, books, mary tudor, novels, queen, queen elizabeth i


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Popular Tags
abdication belgium birth brussels carl philip charlene chris o'neill crown prince frederik crown prince haakon crown princess mary crown princess mette-marit crown princess victoria current events engagement fashion genealogy grand duchess maria teresa grand duke henri hohenzollern infanta leonor infanta sofia jewellery jordan king carl xvi gustav king felipe king felipe vi king harald king juan carlos king philippe king willem-alexander luxembourg nobility official visit olympics ottoman pieter van vollenhoven president komorowski prince albert prince albert ii prince carl philip prince constantijn prince floris prince pieter-christiaan princess aimee princess anita princess beatrix princess charlene princess claire princess laurentien princess mabel princess margriet princess mary princess mary fashion queen letizia queen mathilde queen maxima queen rania queen silvia queen sofia royal royal fashion russia sofia hellqvist spain state visit sweden the hague visit wedding winter olympics 2014



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:00 PM.

Social Knowledge Networks

eXTReMe Tracker
Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2014
Jelsoft Enterprises

Royal News Delivered to your Email!

You can get the latest Royal News right in your inbox.

unsusbcribe at anytime with one click

Close [X]