The Royal Forums Coat of Arms


Join The Royal Forums Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
  #21  
Old 10-10-2007, 12:43 PM
Tosca's Avatar
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Somewhere in the middle of the River Po Valley, Italy
Posts: 3,546
Quote:
Originally Posted by CasiraghiTrio View Post
Diana, to me, epitimized that classic idea of the popular person surrounded by "friends" and admirers, but still lonely.
I'm afraid this is what's going to happen if Charlene marries Albert. i don't know why by she riminds me more and more of Diana. It's not just a matter of blondiness.
__________________

__________________
Let's go back to the old, and we'll have a progress! (Giuseppe Verdi)
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 10-10-2007, 01:49 PM
CasiraghiTrio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Burbank, United States
Posts: 6,402
I can see that, unfortunately, Tosca. I think it took Diana almost her entire lifetime to realize that one of the keys to a happy life is to be your own person. I obviously hope it doesn't take so long for Charlene to realize it, but already she seems surrounded by an awful lot of insincerity and she is not married yet.
__________________

__________________
Chewsteraghi on Tumblr. Schmichaelira on Twitter. Tumblr aka obsessivechewsteraghidisorder. Be warned: I'm weird.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 10-10-2007, 05:21 PM
Vera Friedel's Avatar
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Roma, Italy
Posts: 210
Caroline had a strong family after her, helping her out over the sadness moments of her life, her father Rainier was like a father to her children.
Diana seemed not to have a family read yto help her out.
And last but not least, even if I hate to say that, having loads of money helps you even in the darkest times of your life.
Imagine a " normal" woman as a widow with 3 kids to raise and scarce means...........
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 10-11-2007, 05:54 PM
Ianna's Avatar
Royal Highness
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: My little corner of the world, Croatia
Posts: 1,729
I'm afraid I wouldn't be so eloquent when describing following photo (iloveroyals, your in deepth description(s) is/are publish worth one(s)), but I'll try..

Princess Caroline by H.Newton (thanks K. for help)

From the moment I first saw it, it haunted me with its symbolic..Apart of so many details that can be described (body/hand position, black outfit, mountain scenery, etc.) helping to create 'puzzle-strong' story, it's that attached look towards 'sky', 'dare-look', & serenity of face, that reveal us woman of great inner strenght, great potential..For me, this photo captures the essence of Caroline.
__________________
On the last day of the Creation God desired to crown His work,
and thus created Kornati Islands out of tears, stars and breath.
(George Bernard Shaw)
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 10-12-2007, 09:52 AM
Courtier
TRF Author
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Arlington, United States
Posts: 850
Ianna, I agree with your comments (aside from the fact it could be published, that's tongue-in-cheek, isn't? Publishing something like that requires hours of work, everything has to be perfect, and I am doing this for fun, almost in a stream-of-consciousness kind of way). But I think that photo represents only one aspect of her essence, that she has so many "essences", even if it sounds like a contradiction in terms. I am sure we could say the same about everybody, but how many of us get to have our multiple essences captured for posterity to dissect at will ?
I am now haunted by the picture of her as a young widow. For some reson, I feel she is looking out at sea, and is a higher-scale version of all the sailors's wives who always worry whether their husbands will come back to shore safely. At the same time, she is so well put together, even her flowing hair is in place somehow, that she is the port of safety. The photograph looks almost like a painting, or like a posed photograph, although I imagine it was taken by a paparazzi. I also remember a quote from a friend of hers (I'll have to find the exact quote), that Caroline has the quality of being "frighteningly focused". I think you see that in that picture : a sense of order, a sense of accepting one's destiny, a sense of however much things may seem confused or get out of control, she'll restore control and design. She is definitely the woman in charge. I am sure she learned some of that from her mother, who in a quote said that when things got out of hand for her emotionally, she reverted to her professional training and became an actress : the woman people wanted to see, the performance they expected, not the real woman who might be falling apart inwardly, adding that it was very therapeutic.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 10-12-2007, 10:18 AM
Tosca's Avatar
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Somewhere in the middle of the River Po Valley, Italy
Posts: 3,546
Quote:
I am sure she learned some of that from her mother, who in a quote said that when things got out of hand for her emotionally, she reverted to her professional training and became an actress : the woman people wanted to see, the performance they expected, not the real woman who might be falling apart inwardly, adding that it was very therapeutic.
When interviewed on his birthday, old journalist Enzo Biagi, recalled of the personalities he had interviewed in his long career, and among these he also mentined Princess Grace. So the interviewer asked him what had struck him about this woman: her stunning beauty, elegance, glamour. Unespectedly Biagi answered: "What struck me? Her total lack of sincerity!"
__________________
Let's go back to the old, and we'll have a progress! (Giuseppe Verdi)
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 10-12-2007, 12:10 PM
Courtier
TRF Author
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Arlington, United States
Posts: 850
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ianna View Post
I'm afraid I wouldn't be so eloquent when describing following photo (iloveroyals, your in deepth description(s) is/are publish worth one(s)), but I'll try..

Princess Caroline by H.Newton (thanks K. for help)

From the moment I first saw it, it haunted me with its symbolic..Apart of so many details that can be described (body/hand position, black outfit, mountain scenery, etc.) helping to create 'puzzle-strong' story, it's that attached look towards 'sky', 'dare-look', & serenity of face, that reveal us woman of great inner strenght, great potential..For me, this photo captures the essence of Caroline.
My apologies, Ianna, here I was carrying on with my own thoughts, and had not even realized you had posted a new picture. I'll give you my feedback as soon as I can. It's a great picture, one I had never seen.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 10-12-2007, 08:43 PM
Courtier
TRF Author
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Arlington, United States
Posts: 850
Ianna, this is truly a fascinating picture. The hand (or eye) of the genius photographer is at work again in this one. I find it so rich, so ambivalent, that I don't know where to start.

I don't know where the picture was taken, the caption says the south of France, but I don't know what they mean by that. But the rock behind her is highly significant. Caroline and Stephanie were always called "Les demoiselles du Rocher", "The young ladies of the Rock", so I think that's the immediate reference every viewer will make.

She seems to be praying, yet her hands are not in the usual position of hands in prayer. I would even say that it is the only thing in the whole picture that seems a little "out of joint" so to speak. Everything else is absolute purity. Can anyone imagine a more perfect profile than Caroline's ? She has the beauty of a woman in her thirties, you can see the lines beginning to sag ever so slightly, the cheeks are a bit hollow, she is no longer in the prime bloom of her beauty, but she has achieved another kind of beauty, whose purity gives it an ethereal quality. Is she a madona or is she a pilgrim who came to pray in a place where the Virgin appeared ? (Remember that she worked in Lourdes as a teenager, helping with the handicapped people, and Sainte-Bernadette must have made a deep impression on her in the austere, beautiful setting of the Pyrennes.)

She wears a pilgrim coat, or is it really a pilgrim coat or a princess's idea of what a pilgrim coat looks like? (Only teasing). It seems made of a rich, luxuriant fabric, velvet perhaps.

She is a great study of a combination of soft or perfect curves (look at her eyebrows, her forehead, so delicately delineated) and soft angles (her chin, her nose). Her usually sensuous mouth is downplayed and it is her gaze and serious expression that take center stage : she is in a state of "recueillement" (a word impossible to translate : spiritual and religious meditation and self-absorption come closest), distant from worldly matters. Helmut Newton used her well-known profound faith to represent her as one of us, one of the lowly who must, like everybody else pray to a greater entity. (This is to be taken metaphorically, I know many are atheists, but I think he might have wanted to "lower" her status, in order to exalt her all the more.)

Her profile is like the one that used to appear on coins, the profiles of the rulers of the world. Her head is turned upward, usually a sign of haughtiness, yet if she is praying, it is also a sign of supplication. What would she be asking for ? Her face is so composed, you can hardly believe she is pleading for some favor, rather communing completely with the sacred.

Her long neck is duplicated in a way by her long hair. The hair is also perfect, just brushed back, which gives her a timelessness (we can't date her by her hairstyle). The hair is not too long, which would emphasize sensuousness, but long enough to be feminine and luxuriantly healthy, and yes, rich.

The earrrings are interesting because a bit incongruous. Here she is, pared to the bone, so to speak, and the earrings remind us that she is Princess Caroline. Without getting into why Newton wanted them, let's assume for a minute it was Princess Caroline's idea : she is willing to be humbled in front of God's greatness (if she is really shown praying), but to have her worldly status visible as well. I wouldn't go so far as to say it's a power struggle, Caroline is much too devout for that, just a playful gesture perhaps reminiscent of the old monarchies where the king was just below God in power. So that would be a sort of historical reference, and we know Caroline is quite passionate about history, and the history of monarchies certainly.

The hands are a mystery to me for among all that serenity, that beautiful harmonious composition, they are jarring, a bit twisted, as if they, alone, expressed some anguish or torment, or questioning, or puzzlement, completely at odds with the composed face and body.

Thank you for sharing this picture with us, I have fallen in love with it and can't wait for other reactions !
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 10-13-2007, 05:29 AM
Courtier
TRF Author
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Arlington, United States
Posts: 850
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tosca View Post
When interviewed on his birthday, old journalist Enzo Biagi, recalled of the personalities he had interviewed in his long career, and among these he also mentined Princess Grace. So the interviewer asked him what had struck him about this woman: her stunning beauty, elegance, glamour. Unespectedly Biagi answered: "What struck me? Her total lack of sincerity!"
It's a strange comment, isn't ? So, either when she is being interviewed, she gives the answers she thinks are expected of her but does it so badly that she comes across as insincere (making her a bad actress, which of course she wasn't), or she makes a point of coming across as insincere (making her a good actress), but to what point, for what effect? So everybody knows she is insincere ?
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 10-15-2007, 09:39 AM
Tosca's Avatar
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Somewhere in the middle of the River Po Valley, Italy
Posts: 3,546
Quote:
Originally Posted by iloveroyals View Post
It's a strange comment, isn't ? So, either when she is being interviewed, she gives the answers she thinks are expected of her but does it so badly that she comes across as insincere (making her a bad actress, which of course she wasn't), or she makes a point of coming across as insincere (making her a good actress), but to what point, for what effect? So everybody knows she is insincere ?
I guess we should ask Mr. Biagi!
__________________
Let's go back to the old, and we'll have a progress! (Giuseppe Verdi)
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 10-16-2007, 06:25 AM
lea's Avatar
lea lea is offline
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by iloveroyals View Post
It's a strange comment, isn't ? So, either when she is being interviewed, she gives the answers she thinks are expected of her but does it so badly that she comes across as insincere (making her a bad actress, which of course she wasn't), or she makes a point of coming across as insincere (making her a good actress), but to what point, for what effect? So everybody knows she is insincere ?
Perhaps it was defiance, a way of saying that even though her life and her choices obligated her to do these interviews, she would give no more of herself. Rather like Princess Caroline's no expression photographs. That's like saying "take your photograph, but you'll get nothing of me."
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 01-04-2009, 02:28 PM
Courtier
TRF Author
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Arlington, United States
Posts: 850
This post is too long. I had to cut it into three parts.
Last May, (05/10/2008) tbhrc (Pictures of Princess Caroline from the 90’s, page 8, post 152) posted a link to a portrait of Princess Caroline, a photograph by Robert Wilson and one of my New Year’s resolutions was to write about it, hoping to stimulate others to respond. My contribution is raw and incomplete, but I hope, a beginning.
tbhrc also gave links to essays and commentaries about this portrait and reading them has been very helpful in formulating my own interpretation. These links are fascinating and make you want to see and learn more about Sargent and painters of his time. Thank you, tbhrc, for posting that wonderful link, sorry I don’t know how to move the link to this thread.
Just as Helmut Newton’s picture of Princess Caroline stirred up my imagination, which led me to create this thread, so does Wilson’s portrait. In comparing the two, the first obvious difference is that Princess Caroline faces and stares at the viewer in Helmut Newton’s photograph. She faces away from the viewer in Wilson’s portrait. As the photographer’s commentary makes clear, however, she is aware of being looked at by someone behind her. In a wink to Rear Window in which Grace Kelly shows Jimmy Stewart, the “voyeur” of the movie, the missing ring as a clue to the murder, the focus of attention is her hands, right in the middle of the picture, her right hand pointing to a wedding ring on her left hand.
I’ll start with the hands and the wedding ring. Wilson speaks of the movie’s “lost wedding ring”. This photograph, taken in the early 2000’s, seems to emphasize Princess Caroline’s dual status : she has lost her husband Stefano, and is remarried to Prince Ernst: so it is indeed a lost wedding ring, if it refers to her as a widow, but is also a recovered ring since she is remarried. In this way, a dual and ambivalent way, she may be paying homage to both her lost husband and her new husband.
Apart from a focus on the wedding ring, the gesture alludes to being handcuffed. Princess Caroline is bound to the past and history, bound to her mother’s legacy, bound to her title and the constraints it entails. She is also bound to us, insatiable viewers or voyeurs, and to photographers. She cannot escape her fate. She can turn her back on us, she can remain in darkness, but the edges always remain illuminated.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 01-04-2009, 02:30 PM
Courtier
TRF Author
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Arlington, United States
Posts: 850
2nd part of post :

Sargent’s portrait of Madame X, which Wilson says this photograph is inspired from, created quite an uproar at the time. In fact, he had to change what to our contemporary eyes seems like an almost insignificant element to make it acceptable to the critics and public : Originally, one shoulder of Madame’s X’s dress had been pulled down. Apparently, the scandalous nature of this detail was not so much the idea that it exposed more flesh but that it was unseemly to appear to be half undressed or undressing, or redressing, as one chooses to interpret it. From what I have read, Madame X’s reputation was already rather compromised, and it just called attention to a fact the socialite or her husband would rather not highlight.
In Wilson’s portrait of Princess Caroline , her dress is irrelevant. It seems indeed rather shapeless, and in my opinion, emphasizes that she is now a middle-aged woman by the lack of emphasis on a waist, and the broad shoulders. The dress is all black (accurately reflecting Princess Caroline’s usual choice of color or lack thereof) and without definition. Yet, I see a wink in the direction of Sargent’s original portrait in the slit down her back, the equivalent of the shoulder down. To put it bluntly, it appears that Princess Caroline is not wearing a bra, that all she is wearing is that strict-looking, almost austere black dress. This would be the third ambiguity or ambivalence of the picture: two viewers, one in front of her,(the direction of her gaze), one behind her, explicitly defined as a voyeur as by the reference to the Hitchcock movie, a wedding ring that signals both her widowhood and her married state, and a stark-looking dress that belies its starkness by revealing the absence of an upper undergarment. What should one call that slit in the back ? It almost looks like a cut, a gash, a slash as by a knife. It is a ray of white in all that black. Is it another reference to her widowhood, her wound, her scar? Is it a sign of vulnerability, of exposure, (even she is not “covered” from the wounds of life), or is it a ray of hope, a sign of her sexuality, sensuality and rejuvenation renewed by her marriage?
The picture is notably stark. There are no props, as in Sargent’s portrait, no furniture, no feathers or fan in her hands, no drapery, nothing to complement or detract from the subject. And so Caroline stands alone, deprived of all symbols of power usually associated with royal status. But then, why would Caroline need them ? She is, and has been for the longest time, the epitome of real royalty, even though the royal status of the Principality of Monaco is often disputed or belittled. In an earlier official photograph by, I think, Karl Lagerfeld, when she was a young wife and mother, she wore a royal blue elaborately frilly long gown, a tiara with matching earrings, and looked out from the palace’s balcony alternatively to her kingdom as it were and the wide blue sea, surrounded by her exquisitely handsome and well-groomed husband and children. She had it all. Now, she stands alone. And yet, even though the angle from which she is photographed is different, the pose is unmistakenly hers, with that way of tilting her head up which so often is viewed as arrogance. Let’s say instead that this is a woman so aware of her power that all she needs is this signifier (her signature lilting up of her head) to show who she is: she is unequivocally confident in herself and her status, she stands like a queen, her pose held in a supremely controlled way. She stands imposingly and even dramatically tall, very still, and from the stillness emanates her force, in a kind of insolent magnificence. The photographer transforms one ordinary individual into a kind of mythical figure. She could have played in a Greek tragedy, Euripides’s Trojan women for example, the role of Andromache.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 01-04-2009, 02:31 PM
Courtier
TRF Author
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Arlington, United States
Posts: 850
3d and final part !
What to make of her expression ? Madame X’s expression is detached. To me, she looks like a socialite who is used to being looked at, maybe even evaluated and gossiped about, and who is past caring. She looks unconcerned , calm and indifferent. Princess Caroline’s expression is hard to define, partly because of the angle Wilson has chosen to photograph her from. It is not a profile, it is not a three-quarter pose, if there is a name for that kind of angle, I don’t know it. It makes her expression more mysterious and open to all kinds of interpretation. Again, the photographer has chosen to show the marks of aging, as the lower cheek is slightly lined and slightly sagging. The face is too strong and too full of character to be that of a very young woman. There seems to be a narrative behind the expression and the signs of age. It speaks of solitude, it betrays melancholy. It is somewhat dreamy, internally-oriented, although she seems to be looking at someone. It is also somewhat defiant, not with the defiance of adolescence, but the defiance of experience. But again, the real eloquence of expression is not to be found in her face but in the gesture of her hands.
When you look at Sargent’ s portrait and Wilson’s photograph side by side, you are struck by how the two pictures stand to each other like a photograph and a negative, immediately rendering irrelevant the Nicole Kidman posing in Madame X’s manner for a 1999 tribute to Sargent in Vogue magazine, which stands to Sargent’s painting like an original and a copy. The picture of Madame X uses the black dress to emphasize the white flesh of the subject, her body, her face. The picture of Caroline has her almost entirely in dark, except for some illumination around the edges. The light and awareness of flesh is concentrated in the slash in her dress as a rearward décolletage. What is forward-facing on one is rearward facing on the other. What is dark in one is illuminated in the other. While Caroline seems to have her hands tied, Madame X’s arms are spread wide and part of her magnetism emanates from the power of her arms. Her fingers, in spite of the emphasis on being “Madame” are free of rings. Her freedom is also expressed in her hair, which although well-coiffed, is swept back and loosely contained. Caroline’s hair is so contained and dark that she could be wearing a toque. Madame X looks with hauteur beyond the margins of the painting. Her position is regal, aristocratic, assured—as is her face in profile looking away from the viewer as in disdain, yet at the same time, she is poised in a position of strength that could at a moment spring into action. She belongs in a Proust novel. In contrast, Nicole Kidman’s delicate beauty, finally chiseled face and whiteness, slightly uncomfortable expression makes her look fragile, with the vulnerability of a very young woman. Kidman’s pose suggests that she is about to move away from the table, whereas Caroline seems immovable, statuesque, not only in her actual height or grandeur but in a kind of immortality reserved for the goddesses of mythology. It reminds me of Alain Resnais’s 1961 black and white movie “Last Year at Marienbad”, where statues feature prominently, and where the main characters are fascinated by them and keep giving contradictory interpretations of them. It is as if Princess Caroline could be immortalized, frozen in stone and used in a film for dramatic purposes. In a way, Caroline comes across as being androgynous, a figure neither male nor female (the slash in the back—the décolletage—would look the same way in either a male or female), and unanchored in time or place. Like characters in film, like her mother in Rear Window and all her other movies, she is now out of time, more spirit than flesh.
Like Helmut Newton, Robert Wilson’s portrait is in black and white, the best medium to let spirit and soul come across through light and darkness. Unlike Newton, Wilson chose to include very few subtle elements, the slit in the dress, the hands and the ring, to let us dream of what a life is, when caught along the axis of bondage and power, hidden and revealed.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 01-04-2009, 03:05 PM
Elly C's Avatar
Royal Highness
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Worcester, United Kingdom
Posts: 1,801
Thank you for such an intelligent & thoughtful reading of this remarkable portrait. To me it conjours up a tremendous sense of self containment - the pose strikes me as both aloof & remote. Although there's much to admire, I can't warm to this portrait (perhaps because it starkness is so uncompromising)
Given the strong ontline definition of the body, I'm struck by the relalatively undefined profile of the face.
I would very much like to know if Caroline had any input to the final version
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 01-04-2009, 10:03 PM
Courtier
TRF Author
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Arlington, United States
Posts: 850
Elly C, thanks for your feedback. I agree with you that it's hard to warm to this portrait. I myself don't, but I find it interesting. I'll try to write more about it later, and like you, I wonder if Caroline had any input to the final version. In fact, I wonder what kind of reviews it got, and it there were any interviews attached to it, any comments by the princess. It would be interesting to know what other versions existed, why they were discarded, and how the final choice was made, since photographers take scores of pictures before they choose the one they feel is most representative. Whose choice might have prevailed ? How Caroline saw herself or wanted to be seen, or how the artist saw her and wanted that vision to be seen ? We know Caroline is very much into the arts, but does her support go as far when it is her own image that is at stake ?
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 01-05-2009, 04:08 PM
Serene Highness
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: ......, Argentina
Posts: 1,383
Thank you iloveroyals for your impressions on this picture, i enjoyed the reading. I admire your way with words ( well i envy that in everyone, in a good sense). I can´t believe you can write so many lines about a photo, that made me think of so many interpretations. This is the kind of portrait i prefer, instead of the happy portrait of a family. It reminds me of an interview in which she said: "i´ve been taught not to make any gesture when being photographed so that people can make their own interpetation."
There´s something that bothers me in this one. She should be looking at the sea or from a balcony, but instead we can see there´s a screen or wall, the lowest part is something that bothers the sight. It´s just a detail, but it would be perfect without that. I think this picture is probably a homage to her mother, but it may mean many things. I wish i knew what Caroline´s interpretation is.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 01-05-2009, 05:55 PM
Courtier
TRF Author
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Arlington, United States
Posts: 850
Thank you, rosana, for your feedback. It's good to have a conversation going.
It's interesting, what you say, about your liking this kind of portrait rather than one of a happy family. Indeed, there is a coldness, bordering on hardness about this picture that makes her anything but pretty. It reminds me of Christina Onassis, who was always said to be beautiful but not pretty. Caroline, for the longest time, was both. In this picture, Caroline is beyond beautiful, she is secret, majestic, almost exalted. She has divested herself of all signs of femininity. We can hardly see the shape of her body, she does not wear any jewelry except for the very simple wedding band, and we can't see her shoes : that's a very telling sign ! It makes her taller, almost elevated. Her dress could almost be the habit of a monk, so we are left with very little to indicate who she is. She is barely more than a silhouette outlined against a dark background, and turning her back on top of that too. It may be that she, or the photographer, really liked to play on the ambiguity of her being like a black and white screen goddess, she who never acted in a film. Yet, as I said, I could very well have pictured her in the movie The Trojan Women, playing either Vanessa Redgrave's role, or Irene Papas.

The pose and attitude certainly emphasize the distance she wants to put between her and us. She makes herself inaccessible. She is almost like an emperor (and I use the masculine on purpose because there is something almost virile in her pose), reluctantly turning around to grant someone an audience when she'd rather remain lost in her own thoughts.

I also wondered what she was looking at: perhaps the lack of background, of any landscape, window, balcony of any kind, indicates that she is looking at something internal, either the past or the future. If the interpretation of the ring is correct, that it is a lost ring (her widowhood) and a recovered ring (her remarriage), then she would be looking at both, and that is an internal landscape. The lack of anything material around her may also indicate that she is beyond the material, that nothing materialistic can affect her or draw her attention.

I puzzle about the lack of "lightness of being", and it also made me wonder if the color black which she seems to favor since losing Stefano indicates that she is now and forever a widow, first and foremost. I remember reading that when Stefano died, her first gesture was to cut her hair short, and it was a very Italian or Mediterranean reaction, a very public and symbolic gesture, as if to say "I am no longer a woman", "I do not care about my femininity or sensuality anymore", kind of like nuns do when they enter the convent, although not quite as drastic. Ironically though, she did shave her head a few years later. That is very intense !

I agree: I wish Caroline would give her own interpretation, especially if she had a lot of input in how it should be done. I haven't found any materials about it though.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 01-05-2009, 09:20 PM
Horseygal's Avatar
Serene Highness
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: New York, United States
Posts: 1,174
Quote:
Originally Posted by iloveroyals View Post
Where/when was this picture taken - it almost looks "photo chopped" - NOT implying that you did it, and - not that Caroline wasn't a stunner when she was young - but the color of her face doesn't go w/the skin color of the body - just curious if it came from a reliable source like an old magazine from the early '80, since she looked pudgier in the '70s....
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 01-06-2009, 06:36 AM
Courtier
TRF Author
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Arlington, United States
Posts: 850
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horseygal View Post
Where/when was this picture taken - it almost looks "photo chopped" - NOT implying that you did it, and - not that Caroline wasn't a stunner when she was young - but the color of her face doesn't go w/the skin color of the body - just curious if it came from a reliable source like an old magazine from the early '80, since she looked pudgier in the '70s....
I assume you meant "photoshopped". I don't photoshop pictures but I do "photo chop" them. Since I don't presume to ever become a Princess Caroline scholar, I have the unfortunate habit of cutting off the edges (and therefore sources, bylines, etc.), to fit into my protective sheets or albums, as well as not keeping the cover of the magazine, which would verify the source . So, all I can tell you is that it came from the section entitled "Les Gens" in Paris-Match, date unknown (I assume mid to late eighties). It is a well-known photograph by one of the best known photographers, so it should'nt too hard to find someone who has another copy of the same photo, for comparison's sake.
__________________

__________________
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
King Juan Carlos's Onomástica (Saint's Day); June 24, 2006 lula King Juan Carlos and Queen Sofia 57 06-28-2006 06:47 AM
Make A Difference Day; December 9 and 10, 2005 Marengo Dutch Royals 47 12-23-2005 02:44 PM
"Style and Splendour: Queen Maud of Norway's Wardrobe" exhibition GrandDuchess Norwegian Royal History 66 11-27-2005 10:18 PM




Additional Links
Popular Tags
birth bourbon-parma charlene chris o'neill crown prince frederik crown prince haakon crown princess letizia crown princess mary crown princess mette-marit crown princess victoria current events dutch royal history fashion grand duchess maria teresa grand duke henri hohenzollern infanta cristina infanta elena infanta leonor infanta sofia jordan king abdullah ii king carl xvi gustav king felipe king felipe vi king harald king juan carlos king philippe king willem-alexander luxembourg ottoman pom prince albert prince albert ii prince carl philip prince constantijn prince felipe prince floris prince laurent prince pieter-christiaan princess princess alexia (2005 -) princess anita princess ariane princess beatrix princess catharina-amalia princess charlene princess claire princess elisabeth princess laurentien princess letizia princess mabel princess madeleine princess margriet princess marie princess mary princess of asturias queen letizia queen mathilde queen maxima queen paola queen rania queen silvia queen sofia royal russia spain state visit wedding william


Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

RV & Travel Trailer Communities

Our RV & Travel Trailer sites encompasses virtually all types of Recreational Vehicles, from brand-specific to general RV communities.

» More about our RV Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002-2012 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:28 AM.

Social Knowledge Networks

eXTReMe Tracker
Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2014
Jelsoft Enterprises

Royal News Delivered to your Email!

You can get the latest Royal News right in your inbox.

unsusbcribe at anytime with one click

Close [X]