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  #161  
Old 02-20-2006, 05:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Danielane
In France there is break for Christmas, two weeks, then lessons and mid- or end-January exams at the university, then a february-break, then lessons, then Easter-break (march or april). Break for universities and for schools are slightly different.
why do you guys have so many breaks?
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  #162  
Old 02-20-2006, 05:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cro girl
^^^^
I guess there is one break more in Europe. I'm from Croatia so I don't know what's the situation like in France. But here people at universities don't have classes for the entire month of February, only exams. But some decide not to take the exams and go skiing instead.
oh wow, we don't get anything like that here!
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  #163  
Old 02-20-2006, 07:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by acid_rain3075
BUT WHAT MID-WINTER BREAK is what I'm trying to say! The next break should be in March which in in the Spring! WINTER IN OVER!! Sorry to be rude!
What do you mean, "what" mid-winter break?

It's just what I just said, a "mid-winter" break. Not a holiday break or anything. Just a break.

There will be ANOTHER break in April, which would be the Spring Break.

Maybe that only applies to the Northeastern states?
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  #164  
Old 02-20-2006, 09:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M|L
What do you mean, "what" mid-winter break?

It's just what I just said, a "mid-winter" break. Not a holiday break or anything. Just a break.

There will be ANOTHER break in April, which would be the Spring Break.

Maybe that only applies to the Northeastern states?
Well then maybe it does because after Christmas and Spring Breaks there are no more breaks for us on the West Coast (well, I'm not sure about Washington and Oregon but in Alaska and California thats the way it is or at least should be). And you know, mid winter would actually be Christmas but since your hell bent there is another break, then, you know, what can you do about it. And you know what, this wasn't the point of my first question. But oh well, SORRY EVERYONE, THIS BIT IS WAY OFF TOPIC!
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  #165  
Old 02-21-2006, 08:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BeccaLynn07
Any new/more photos from Charlotte on the Zurs ski trip from this year?
Every country in europe is different, and university and high school are different too.
I've had a mix of spanish and french education and I think the french system is most peculiar.
Charlotte is in prepa at lycée Fénelon in Paris and she has courses from monday to saturday morning wich is quite uncommon in other countries and she started school the 1st of september (earlier than universities) and does not finish her lessons until the second week of july. Maybe to equilibrate that they got 10 days off october-november, a bit more than two weeks off for christmas, two weeks on february, and two weeks in easter.
Anyway, this are the timetables at lycée fénélon but since she is in khâgne the courses will stop earlier for her class so that they can take the exam.
If she is trying to get into Ulms, maybe that's why she does not go out very much and she only went skiing for a couples of days. She must be home studying like mad!!
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  #166  
Old 02-22-2006, 10:25 AM
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French School System Part 1

I really hope every question will be answered now....

Wikipedia.com

The French educational system is highly centralized, organized, and ramified. It is divided into three stages:
  • primary education (enseignement primaire);
  • secondary education (enseignement secondaire);
  • tertiary or college education (enseignement supérieur)
Primary and secondary education is predominantly public (private schools also exist, in particular a strong nationwide network of primary and secondary Catholic education), while tertiary education has both public and private elements.


School calendar


In the Metropolitan territory, the school year extends from early-September to early-July. Most students have finished their year by Bastille Day, 14 July. The school calendar is standardized throughout the country, and is the sole domain of the ministry.
For the 2005-2006 school year, the first day of classes across the country is 2 September. The year ends on 4 July.
In French overseas departments and territories], the school calendar is set by the local recteur.
Major holiday breaks are as follows:
  • All Saints (la Toussaint), one and a half weeks around the end of October and the beginning of November;
  • Christmas (Noël), two weeks around Christmas Day and New Year's Day;
  • winter (hiver), two weeks starting in mid-February;
  • spring (printemps), two weeks starting in mid-April;
  • summer (été), two months starting in early-July.
All Saints, Christmas and summer vacations occur simultaneously across the country. For the winter and spring breaks, the country is divided into three zones (A, B, and C) and each zone's vacation dates are shifted by one or two weeks to prevent families from crowding up in popular destinations such as ski and seashore resorts.


Primary education

Maternelle (Kindergarten)

Age 3 - Petite section - PS
4 - Moyenne section - MS
5 - Grande section - GS

École primaire (Primary school)

Age 6 - Cours préparatoire - CP
7 - Cours élémentaire première année - CE1
8 - Cours élémentaire deuxième année - CE2
9 - Cours moyen première année - CM1
10 - Cours moyen deuxième année - CM2

Schooling in France is mandatory as of age 6, the first year of primary school. Many parents start sending their children earlier though, around age 3 as kindergarten classes (maternelle) are usually affiliated to a borough's primary school. Some even start earlier at age 2 in pré-maternelle classes, which are essentially daycare centres. The last year of maternelle, grande section is an important step in the educational process as it is the year in which pupils are introduced to reading.
After kindergarten, the young students move on to primary school. It is in the first year (cours préparatoire) that they will learn to write and perfect their reading skills. Much akin to other educational systems, French primary school students usually have a single teacher (or perhaps two) who instructs in many different disciplines, such as French, mathematics, natural sciences, history and geography to name a few (the latter two are seldom separated). Note that the French word for a teacher at the primary school level is instituteur, or its feminine form institutrice.
Religious instruction is not supplied by public schools. Laïcité (a term referring to the separation of church and state) is one of the main precepts of the French republic. Pupils therefore have civics courses to teach them about la République, its function, its organization, and its famous motto Liberté, égalité, fraternité (Freedom, equality, brotherhood).
In a March2004 ruling, the French government banned all "conspicuous religious symbols" from schools and other public institutions with the intent of preventing proselitization and to foster a sense of tolerance among ethnic groups. The law was not welcomed by all though, and some religious and libertarian groups showed their opposition saying the law hindered the freedom of religion, as protected by the French constitution.

Secondary education

Collège (Junior high school)

Age 11 - Sixième - 6e
12 - Cinquième - 5e
13 - Quatrième - 4e
14 - Troisième - 3e

Lycée (High school)

Age 15 Seconde - 2de
16 Première - 1e
17 Terminale - Term

French secondary education is divided into two schools:
  • the collège (somewhat comparable to U.S. junior high school) for the first four years directly following primary school;
  • the lycée (comparable to a U.S. high school) for the next three years.
The completion of secondary studies leads to the baccalauréat.

Baccalauréat

For more details on this topic, see Baccalauréat. The baccalauréat (also known as bac) is the end-of-lycée diploma students sit for in order to enter university, a classe préparatoire, or professional life. The term baccalauréat refers to the diploma and the examinations themselves. It is comparable to British A-Levels, American SATs, the Irish Leaving Certificate and German Abitur.
Most students sit for the baccalauréat général which is divided into 3 streams of study, called séries. The série scientifique (S) is concerned with the natural sciences, the série économique et sociale (ES) with economics and social sciences, and the série littéraire (L) focuses on French and foreign languages and philosophy.
There is also the baccalauréat technologique and baccalauréat professionel.

End of Part 1
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  #167  
Old 02-22-2006, 10:31 AM
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French School System Part 2

From Wikipedia.com

Tertiary education


Peculiarities

A striking trait of higher education in France, compared to other countries such as the United States, is the small size and multiplicity of establishments, each specialized in a more or less broad spectrum of disciplines. A middle-sized French city, such as Grenoble or Nancy, may have 2 or 3 universities (for instance: science / humanities), and also a number of engineering and other specialized higher education establishments. For instance, in Paris and suburbs, there are 13 universities, most of which are specialized on one area or the other, and a large number of smaller institutions.
It is not uncommon for graduate teaching programs (masters degrees, the course part of PhD programs etc.) to be operated in common by several institutions, allowing the institutions to present a large variety of courses.
In engineering schools such as École polytechnique, it is not uncommon that a large share of the teaching staff is not made up of permanent professors, but of part-time professors hired to do teaching only. These part-time professors are generally hired from neighbouring universities, research institutes, or industry.
Another originality of the French higher education system is that a large share of the scientific research is not done by universities, but by research establishments such as CNRS or INSERM. In many cases, the research units of those establishments are installed inside universities (or other higher education establishments), and jointly operated by the research establishment and the university. It is also fairly common that research staff teach some graduate classes, for instance. However, this research staff will not be counted as part of the normal academic staff of the university.
These traits can cause international university rankings to underestimate French universities due to the criteria used.
Another characteristic is the low tuition costs. Since higher education is paid by the French taxpayers, the prices are very low: as of 2005, 160 euros (one hundred sixty) per year for undergrads, 200 euros (two hundred) per year for graduate students and 300 euros (three hundred) for Phd students... So theoretically, one can get a Masters degree (in 5 years) for about US$1,000. However the price for tuition in an engineering school can reach 600 (six hundred) euros a year.
Health insurance for students is about the same price as the tuition, so only the living costs and books expenses have to be added. This can explain the very low rate of people under 25 years old who are on the job market in France.



Universities in France


Grandes écoles & classes préparatoires (CPGE)

The Grandes écoles of France are higher education establishments outside the mainstream framework of the public universities. They are generally focused on a single subject area, such as engineering, have a moderate size, and are often quite selective in their admission of students. They are widely regarded as prestigious, and traditionally have produced most of France's managing directors and executives.
The classes préparatoires aux grandes écoles (CPGE) is a high school prep course with the main goal of training students for enrollment in a grande école or an engineering school. Admission to the CPGE is very competitive and is usually based on performance during the last two years of high school, called Première and Terminale. Each CPGE receives the files of hundreds of applicants worldwide every year during April and May, and selects its new students under its own criteria (mostly excellency). A few CPGE programs, mainly the private CPGEs (which account for 10% of CPGEs), also have an interview process or look at a student's involvement in the community, although the latter has much less importance than in the United States. Of course, each student must have passed successfully his Baccalauréat (or equivalent) in June to be admitted in CPGE. CPGE programs have a nominal duration of two years (the second year can normally only be repeated once).
Although there are CPGEs focused on literature or economics, the most prestigious and selective CPGEs are certainly the scientific ones, which can only be accessed by scientific Bacheliers (the Baccalauréat S being known itself as the most prestigious and selective one). Scientific CPGE are called either MP ("Mathematics and Physics") or PC ("Physics and Chemistry"), etc. First year CPGE students are called the 'Math Sups' (Sup for "Supérieures", Upper in French), and second years 'Math spés' (Spés standing for "Spéciales", special in French). Both the first and second year programs include as much as sixteen hours of mathematics teaching per week, ten hours of physics, two hours of philosophy, two to four hours of (one or two) foreign languages teaching and two to three hours of minor options: either S2I: Engineering Industrial Science or Theoretical Computer Science (including some programmation using the Pascal or CaML programming languages, as a practical work). The amount of work required of the students is exceptionally high. In addition to class time, students spend several hours each week completing exams and 'colles' or 'khôlles'.
The so called 'colles' are unique to French academic education in CPGEs. They consist of oral examinations twice a week. The student spends one hour facing a professor alone in a room and has to answer as many questions correctly as possible, while the teacher regularly increases the difficulty of the questions to make ensure that the student is tested vigorously. 'Colles' are regarded as extremely stressful, particularly due to the high standards expected by the teachers, and the subsequent harshness that may be directed at students who do not perform adequately.

Some links

primary school

Baccalauréat

classes préparatoires aux grandes écoles
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  #168  
Old 02-23-2006, 05:06 AM
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gosh, if i had known that the fee for master's degree is that low (i am paying nearly USD7000 for my master's degree!), I should have enrolled myself in france .. maybe i could continue my PhD there:) :) :)
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  #169  
Old 02-23-2006, 11:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by auroraDaniel
gosh, if i had known that the fee for master's degree is that low (i am paying nearly USD7000 for my master's degree!), I should have enrolled myself in france .. maybe i could continue my PhD there:) :) :)
The university fees are quite low in most european countries. Of course you can take your children to a private costly one, but with the exception of very few economics and law schools, public education has the same level and most people, even rich people go there. In spain Prince Felipe went to a public university were you pay very low fees, and the Sorbonne in Paris is really cheap too.
Of course we pay a lot of taxes in exchange for all this public services (like a free health system for everybody) but I think is really worth it.
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  #170  
Old 02-23-2006, 12:44 PM
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Talk about expensive education, I'm paying approximately USD22,100 a year for my Associates.
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  #171  
Old 02-23-2006, 03:43 PM
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...

i win-- $40,000 a year for undergrad

and the downside to all the cheap education and healthcare, from a capitalist's point of view, is that taxes are insanely high. just another thing to consider.

anything new with charlotte? i wish we could see more pictures of her walking around paris, like the ones with caroline in front of le bon marche.
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  #172  
Old 02-23-2006, 03:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M|L
Talk about expensive education, I'm paying approximately USD22,100 a year for my Associates.
I know it's a bit off-topic, but I am just curious:
is it true that in the States it's quite normal for a family to start saving to send their children to college when they are still young kids?
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  #173  
Old 02-23-2006, 04:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tutú
I know it's a bit off-topic, but I am just curious:
is it true that in the States it's quite normal for a family to start saving to send their children to college when they are still young kids?
Yes, many parents will start saving for their kids' college tutition at a young age. Here in the U.S., four years of undergraduate studies can be seen (on average) as USD40,000 (private, public is more like USD25,000-30,000, unless you get scholarship or grants) per year. So for four years that's USD160,000. Unless some families are wealthy and they don't need to save in advance, many people have separate accounts or trusts for this purpose.

Now, back to Charlotte! Has she said what she wants to do after college? And what's her major? (:o I'm kind of out of the loop)
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  #174  
Old 02-23-2006, 04:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by auroraDaniel
gosh, if i had known that the fee for master's degree is that low (i am paying nearly USD7000 for my master's degree!), I should have enrolled myself in france .. maybe i could continue my PhD there:) :) :)
The good news is that most European universities accept foreign students.

The bad news is that they have to pay much higher fees!
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  #175  
Old 02-23-2006, 05:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tutú
The university fees are quite low in most european countries. Of course you can take your children to a private costly one, but with the exception of very few economics and law schools, public education has the same level and most people, even rich people go there. In spain Prince Felipe went to a public university were you pay very low fees, and the Sorbonne in Paris is really cheap too.
Of course we pay a lot of taxes in exchange for all this public services (like a free health system for everybody) but I think is really worth it.
In fact, the fees are the same in all the french university, and additionnal fee are illegal.
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  #176  
Old 02-23-2006, 05:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soCal girl
Now, back to Charlotte! Has she said what she wants to do after college? And what's her major? (:o I'm kind of out of the loop)
As far as we know she is in prépa littéraire at lycée fénelon.
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  #177  
Old 02-23-2006, 08:01 PM
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You can take a virtual tour of lycee fenelon at the following:

http://lyc-fenelon.scola.ac-paris.fr
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  #178  
Old 02-25-2006, 01:50 PM
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I just want to say that I say Charlotte everyday in Paris as my school is next to hers
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  #179  
Old 02-25-2006, 02:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by izabella
I just want to say that I say Charlotte everyday in Paris as my school is next to hers
Don't you live in versailles?
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  #180  
Old 02-28-2006, 12:18 AM
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I have just finished reading the previous thread about school and holidays and am very confused. Does that mean Charlotte hasn't even finished school yet? Is she in her final year i.e will sit her BAC in July? I find this strange as she and I are born in the same year (1986) only some months apart (May and August). Yet I am in my 2nd year of University and could be in my 3rd if I didn't take a year off between School and Uni. How can there be such a discrepancy I wonder???
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