The Royal Forums Coat of Arms

Go Back   The Royal Forums > Reigning Houses > Royal House of Denmark > Crown Prince Frederik and Crown Princess Mary and Family

Join The Royal Forums Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
  #81  
Old 08-15-2013, 04:09 PM
HereditaryPrincess's Avatar
Heir Apparent
Royal Blogger
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Greater London, United Kingdom
Posts: 3,475
Thank you for the photos and videos, everyone! Princess Isabella appears to be a lively and happy little girl (and also very cute). I agree with those who said that Isabella looks like she'll be a fun pupil to teach. I imagine that her classmates will have a ball whilst playing with her. I know we still have a few years to wait, but I'm looking forward into Prince Vincent and Princess Josephine's first day of school- I'm sure that will be a double dose of cuteness. I learnt something new today as I didn't know that schools in Denmark started in early August (schools in my country start in early September).
__________________

__________________
"She is a little angel and like her name, she brings sunshine even on cloudy days. From the bottom of our hearts, we would like to thank each and every one of you for your lovely best wishes for our daughter. She feels very loved". HRH Princess Madeleine, Duchess of Hälsingland and Gästrikland on her daughter, HRH Princess Leonore, Duchess of Gotland.
Join my new group!
Reply With Quote
  #82  
Old 08-15-2013, 04:24 PM
Muhler's Avatar
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Eastern Jutland, Denmark
Posts: 5,363
Quote:
Originally Posted by HereditaryPrincess View Post
Thank you for the photos and videos, everyone! Princess Isabella appears to be a lively and happy little girl (and also very cute). I agree with those who said that Isabella looks like she'll be a fun pupil to teach. I imagine that her classmates will have a ball whilst playing with her. I know we still have a few years to wait, but I'm looking forward into Prince Vincent and Princess Josephine's first day of school- I'm sure that will be a double dose of cuteness. I learnt something new today as I didn't know that schools in Denmark started in early August (schools in my country start in early September).
Yep, six weeks of summer holiday. One week of winter holiday in February. One week of autumn holiday in October (week 42), three days of holiday around the Easter weekend. Christmas Holidays from 22 December to 2 January depending on weekdays. And a couple of holidays more during spring.
__________________

__________________
I love work, it absolutely fascinates me. I can sit for hours looking at people working.
Reply With Quote
  #83  
Old 08-15-2013, 04:32 PM
HereditaryPrincess's Avatar
Heir Apparent
Royal Blogger
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Greater London, United Kingdom
Posts: 3,475
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muhler View Post
Yep, six weeks of summer holiday. One week of winter holiday in February. One week of autumn holiday in October (week 42), three days of holiday around the Easter weekend. Christmas Holidays from 22 December to 2 January depending on weekdays. And a couple of holidays more during spring.
Thank you for the additional information Muhler. In the UK, most schools have short holidays which are called "half-term holidays" (for most schools, half-term holidays are a week long; but some schools have two weeks off). I was wondering, do children in Denmark have them too?
__________________
"She is a little angel and like her name, she brings sunshine even on cloudy days. From the bottom of our hearts, we would like to thank each and every one of you for your lovely best wishes for our daughter. She feels very loved". HRH Princess Madeleine, Duchess of Hälsingland and Gästrikland on her daughter, HRH Princess Leonore, Duchess of Gotland.
Join my new group!
Reply With Quote
  #84  
Old 08-15-2013, 05:56 PM
Frelinghighness's Avatar
Heir Presumptive
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: New England, United States
Posts: 2,727
Muhler, I'm afraid I am also shocked at the low skills I encounter in college students and young adults re: spelling, grammar, history:as you saythe basics.Less time reading might account for a lot of this, imo
Is there an age for school? Here, it is usually 5 years oldfor kindergarten, and 6 for first grade.
Our elementary students usually put in 6 hours a day=30/week. However, 20 years ago and more, kindergarten was only half day, which was much better, imo. Little children do get tired and need down time to learn and behave.
AND, when I was in kindergarten, we were forced to take a nap, something I remember well because I coundnt sleep!
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #85  
Old 08-15-2013, 10:09 PM
Juliette2's Avatar
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Boston, United States
Posts: 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by Archduchess Zelia View Post
Isabella wont have that many hours of school - not in the first couple of years. Christian is getting there, but it still isn't too bad for him. When I was in 0 grade, I was in school from 8:00-11:55 am every day, and I can imagine that Bella's day is quite alike (though I don't know, Tranegårdsskolen might have different time tables than my old old school). That's a rough 18 hours a week which isn't too bad for a six year old. My sister, a fifth grader, has around 28 hours a week, more or less, which isn't too bad either. It isn't until you reach the higher grades that it gets tough (and then when you move on to the Danish High School it's just pure torture, I'm going back on Monday and I don't even want to think about my 8:00 am-5:55 pm days).
Thanks for the breakdown! It's good to know that she won't have that many hours at the beginning. Sorry to hear about your long days coming up....Hang in there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ricarda View Post
IIRC Christian was not yet 6 years old when he started school, as he is born on 15 October. At that age a few months can make quite a difference. But I thought that Christian was actually very self-confident and eloquent for his age.
That's true: a few months do make a big difference at that age. Prince Christian definitely seemed self-confident (and sweet!) for his first day of school. I'm glad to hear he was also eloquent (not speaking Danish I wouldn't have known!).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Daria_S View Post
more instructional time doesn't always mean better achievement. Kids get tired, teachers get tired, and that only leads to frustration, and lack of motivation.

I've met teachers who lack basic knowledge in these areas. It's very sad, because when you have teachers who lack basic skills, you'll also have a full generation of students who lack them as well.
I think you make two excellent points. More hours with unprepared teachers won't bring any improvements! I think there's a tendency everywhere in the western world to encourage/support/push for longer days at school so that school becomes really a de facto day care and both parents can work (there are economic advantages for governments to having more people working more hours...) and not only to improve the academic level. If that were the case, teachers certifications would be much stricter, standardized tests made more flexible, etc. But I'm afraid I'm getting OT. I'm sorry to hear that the Danish system is also not faring too well.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #86  
Old 08-16-2013, 04:09 AM
Muhler's Avatar
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Eastern Jutland, Denmark
Posts: 5,363
Quote:
Originally Posted by HereditaryPrincess View Post
Thank you for the additional information Muhler. In the UK, most schools have short holidays which are called "half-term holidays" (for most schools, half-term holidays are a week long; but some schools have two weeks off). I was wondering, do children in Denmark have them too?
School children in DK have those holidays I listed above. A week every couple of months or so.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frelinghighness View Post
Muhler, I'm afraid I am also shocked at the low skills I encounter in college students and young adults re: spelling, grammar, history:as you saythe basics.Less time reading might account for a lot of this, imo
Is there an age for school? Here, it is usually 5 years oldfor kindergarten, and 6 for first grade.
Our elementary students usually put in 6 hours a day=30/week. However, 20 years ago and more, kindergarten was only half day, which was much better, imo. Little children do get tired and need down time to learn and behave.
AND, when I was in kindergarten, we were forced to take a nap, something I remember well because I coundnt sleep!
That's a problem among a number of teachers here as well. Of course such teachers also existed in my time (a certain German teacher springs to mind).
In the past 30-35 years there has been a shift from sitting in classes to doing even more group work and theme weeks. It's become too much. In my time we had theme weeks once or twice a year. It's much more now, up to one every month. There are certain advantages with theme weeks where you combine various subjects and allow the children to work on their own, but... Children are children, they work efficiently a third of the time at most, the rest of the time is idle time. The bright pupils are bored stiff and end up doing most of the work anyway, while the weak pupils go on a free ride - and that's not beneficial for them either.
In my time we had extra booklets the brighter pupils could work on, when they had done their normal required work. And it became a sport among the better pupils as to who was in the lead. Towards the end some subjects were divided into basic level and advanced level. I took arithmetic on basic level because math didn't interest me and it's not my strong subject. It meant that those who were good at a particular subject were challenged at the advanced level, while those who were less good, were taught at a pace that better suited them. - No more, because that would be discriminating the weaker pupils, so it's much better to lower the general level, leaving the bright pupils to be bored stiff and lacking challenges.
Another matter is the parents. There are too many parents who disrespect the work the teachers are trying to do, because their little wonder surely isn't disturbing or lazy, he's just high sprited or creative or whatever. Well, their little wonder is in for a rude shock when school is over and real life begins. I certainly shouldn't expect my parents to side with me against my teachers. In fact it happened only once where I had been slapped very hard by a teacher (I partly deserved it, but that's not point). The problem is that teachers nowadays have very few sanctions against the pupils, especially if the parents can't see any faults in their little prodigy. (I've had a few - frank debates - with other parents about that at PTA meetings, which it's why Mrs. Muhler usually do the talking ).
In my time we risked being sent out the door, sent to the principal's office, get a letter home, having to stay an hour after normal class and sometimes get a slap or being pulled in the hair. The consequences were instant and apart from the physical sanctions, they were useful tools because of course we were unruly sometimes and tried out boundaries. There are very few sanctions now. Basically the teacher can appeal to the pupil - yeah right! Or appeal to the parents, which only works if the parents can accept that their little darling can be unruly.
In my time in 0 grade, we addressed our teacher with Mrs. Berthelsen (the equivalent to sir/maam), stood behind our chairs and sang the going-home-song before we shook hands with our teacher, the boys bowing, the girls curtsying. That was perhaps a little old fashioned, even back then, but it maintained a respectful distance that didn't hurt.
Our son was fortunate with his 0 grade teacher. She had a very good rapport with the children and she hugged each of them at the end of class and that felt good for the children, some of whom really needed a hug. Our daughter's teacher was different: Okay, class is over, dismissed, beat it.
The point is that the inbuild respectful distance to the teacher by for example using their last name is no more and that is a pity, because it was a useful tool.

And the teachers need to realise that they sometimes, just like parents, have to be unpopular. Our primary class teacher was of the old school, we respected her more than we liked her, because she was not afraid of becoming unpopular when it was necessary. However, she was a brillant teacher and we learned something.
Another teacher I fortunately didn't have was a genuine bastard! He taught arithmetic. He had a nack of spotting those who wasn't prepared. They were dragged up to the blackboard and made to solve a problem and he didn't care if it took the rest of the lesson for the unfortunate to solve the problem. And the rest shouldn't feel safe! But his pupils made sure they studied and did their homework for fear of being dragged up to the blackboard. But no one ever liked him.
That's unthinkable now, the helicopter parents would be up in arms and that would also be too athoritarian for the school policy in a state school.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Juliette2 View Post
I think you make two excellent points. More hours with unprepared teachers won't bring any improvements! I think there's a tendency everywhere in the western world to encourage/support/push for longer days at school so that school becomes really a de facto day care and both parents can work (there are economic advantages for governments to having more people working more hours...) and not only to improve the academic level. If that were the case, teachers certifications would be much stricter, standardized tests made more flexible, etc. But I'm afraid I'm getting OT. I'm sorry to hear that the Danish system is also not faring too well.
You said it. That's what I fear too.

ADDED: Summary of article in Billed Bladet #33, 2013.
Skoleprinsessen - The school-princess.
Written by the omnipresent Ulrik Ulriksen.

Not that there is much news. He tells us that there were press from a number of countries and that the mood was relaxed and good. Bella was initially shy but loosened up.
This was incidentally Isabella's first press conference as the majority of the questions were directed and answered by her.

Q: What do you look forward to the most at school?
Bella: "Doing homework".

Q: What do you have in your school bag?
B: "School-folders, cryons, pencil house and then there is a lunch bag".

Q: Do you know some letters already?
B: "Yes, a little".

Q: What's in the lunch bag"?
B: "There is something nice".

Q: What have your big brother told you about how it is to go to school?
B: "That it's good".

Q: Do you know some of your new classmates in advance?
B: "Yes, a couple of girls, who are sweet". (That's not exactly how she said but the meaning is the same).

Q: Shall Prince Christian help you with your homework?
B: "No"!

Q: Prince Christian could write his own name when he started in 0. grade, can you also write your name?
B: "Yes, I can".

Isabella ended the interview by saying: "Thank you very much".

A little later Bella and her parents drove to school where the new 0. graders were recieved by the principal and older pupils singing in a choir. - I learned that the school has a mentor policy. That means that the 0. graders attach themselves to a pupil from 5th grade, who will look after the little one, give advise and help. So when Bella become a 5th grader herself, she will become a mentor.

Mary said: She is very ready for school. So there hasn't been much preparation. She's really ready and very good at writing". Frederik added that they had a most read a little in an ABC and run through the alphabet.
Isabelle will attend SFO, said Frederik: "She has good opportunities for that and she will now". (Referring to the All-Day-School to be implemented next year).
__________________
I love work, it absolutely fascinates me. I can sit for hours looking at people working.
Reply With Quote
  #87  
Old 08-16-2013, 10:04 AM
Frelinghighness's Avatar
Heir Presumptive
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: New England, United States
Posts: 2,727
Another matter is the parents. There are too many parents who disrespect the work the teachers are trying to do, because their little wonder surely isn't disturbing or lazy, he's just high sprited or creative or whatever. Well, their little wonder is in for a rude shock when school is over and real life begins.

An excerpt of your quote above, Muhler, is of course, the real problem. We are absolutely on the same wave length. One sixth grade teacher I know said so many of the parents want their children to have little work, and all A's!
I do remember the discussion a while ago on these boards when I learned that teachers were not addressed Mr./Mrs./Miss, Ms. in Denmark. Thankfully, that is not the case in our public schools here. Only in High school will you find some students becoming "friends" with the teacher and using the first names.
Hugging students is unfortunately not allowed for all kinds of sad reasons.
Shaking hands with the teacher upon leaving the classroom is still practiced in some schools here and some private schools.
Thankfully, corporal punishment hasn't been allowed for some time in most states. It just shows that the adults can behave as poorly as children and have lost control, imo.

A new question. Are all of Isabella's skills in Danish? Is she only learning English in a spoken way when her mother speaks to her? Or is there no English at all in the home.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #88  
Old 08-16-2013, 10:44 AM
Archduchess Zelia's Avatar
Heir Presumptive
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
Posts: 2,074
I strongly believe that at least Christian and Isabella speak English (the twins are probably too young to fully master it, but I suppose they're learning it). There doesn't seem to be a language barrier when they spend time with Mary's family. However, I don't think that it is a Mary talking English and Frederik talking Danish to the kids kind of thing, like it is with Marie (in Marie's case, French) and Joachim.
__________________
"Blessed be god, the king, the queen and all our sweet children be in good health."
— Lady Margaret Beaufort, April 1497

Reply With Quote
  #89  
Old 08-16-2013, 12:57 PM
Courtier
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Trekroner, Denmark
Posts: 547
really like this photo! so proud of their little daughter :-)

http://static1.purepeople.com/articl...ry-620x0-1.jpg
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #90  
Old 08-16-2013, 01:37 PM
Daria_S's Avatar
Majesty
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: My own head, United States
Posts: 7,119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frelinghighness View Post
Another matter is the parents. There are too many parents who disrespect the work the teachers are trying to do, because their little wonder surely isn't disturbing or lazy, he's just high sprited or creative or whatever. Well, their little wonder is in for a rude shock when school is over and real life begins.

An excerpt of your quote above, Muhler, is of course, the real problem. We are absolutely on the same wave length. One sixth grade teacher I know said so many of the parents want their children to have little work, and all A's!
The bolded text above is so true; so many parents believe that their child can do no wrong, is extremely intelligent, and entitled to everything. Unfortunately, no one ever sides with teachers, because principals want to make sure that they keep the parents happy. It's quite disgusting, but it's OK, because when real life sets in, the 'little wonder' will be wondering why, oh, why is nothing going his/her way.

Many parents don't want any homework assigned to their children, because after school, it should be family time. Same goes for any breaks. While I'm all for 'no homework', since it would lessen my workload at home, I have to say that without at least a little bit of reinforcement, the skills that are learned in the classroom may be lost. The argument is of course; teach them all you need to teach them while they're at school, but if skills are not learned, then there's no time to teach all that has to be covered. I wonder, is there anti-homework movement in Denmark too, or is this strictly a US trend?
__________________
"My guiding principles in life are to be honest, genuine, thoughtful and caring".
~Prince William~


I'm not obsessed with royalty...I just think intensely about it.
Reply With Quote
  #91  
Old 08-16-2013, 02:46 PM
Muhler's Avatar
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Eastern Jutland, Denmark
Posts: 5,363
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daria_S View Post
The bolded text above is so true; so many parents believe that their child can do no wrong, is extremely intelligent, and entitled to everything. Unfortunately, no one ever sides with teachers, because principals want to make sure that they keep the parents happy. It's quite disgusting, but it's OK, because when real life sets in, the 'little wonder' will be wondering why, oh, why is nothing going his/her way.

Many parents don't want any homework assigned to their children, because after school, it should be family time. Same goes for any breaks. While I'm all for 'no homework', since it would lessen my workload at home, I have to say that without at least a little bit of reinforcement, the skills that are learned in the classroom may be lost. The argument is of course; teach them all you need to teach them while they're at school, but if skills are not learned, then there's no time to teach all that has to be covered. I wonder, is there anti-homework movement in Denmark too, or is this strictly a US trend?
No, there are schools here that have abolished homework. The purpose of the All Day School is also to give the children the opportunity to do their homework, or at least most of it, while still at school.
I'm a little bit pro and against homework at the same time. Too much homework is a bad idea, I think. A little homework is better. It doesn't hurt the children to learn that there are obligations, because later on in life, depending on the job, they are likely to get "homework" from time to time.
Some children also learn better by self-study or by doing it with the parents, which can also be a kind of quality time while you at the same time get a look at what your child is working on and assess the skills of your child - and sometimes you learn something yourself...
__________________
I love work, it absolutely fascinates me. I can sit for hours looking at people working.
Reply With Quote
  #92  
Old 08-16-2013, 02:51 PM
GracieGiraffe's Avatar
Royal Highness
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Giraffe Land, United States
Posts: 1,773
Quote:
Originally Posted by Archduchess Zelia View Post
I strongly believe that at least Christian and Isabella speak English (the twins are probably too young to fully master it, but I suppose they're learning it). There doesn't seem to be a language barrier when they spend time with Mary's family. However, I don't think that it is a Mary talking English and Frederik talking Danish to the kids kind of thing, like it is with Marie (in Marie's case, French) and Joachim.
I'm convinced the four kids are fluent in English. At least I'd hope so - what an advantage to have an English speaking mother!
__________________
The future George VII's opinion on infant carriers,
"One is not amused."
Reply With Quote
  #93  
Old 08-16-2013, 06:09 PM
HereditaryPrincess's Avatar
Heir Apparent
Royal Blogger
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Greater London, United Kingdom
Posts: 3,475
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muhler View Post
School children in DK have those holidays I listed above. A week every couple of months or so.
Thanks Muhler.

Quote:
ADDED: Summary of article in Billed Bladet #33, 2013.
Skoleprinsessen - The school-princess.
Written by the omnipresent Ulrik Ulriksen.

Not that there is much news. He tells us that there were press from a number of countries and that the mood was relaxed and good. Bella was initially shy but loosened up.
This was incidentally Isabella's first press conference as the majority of the questions were directed and answered by her.

Q: What do you look forward to the most at school?
Bella: "Doing homework".

Q: What do you have in your school bag?
B: "School-folders, cryons, pencil house and then there is a lunch bag".

Q: Do you know some letters already?
B: "Yes, a little".

Q: What's in the lunch bag"?
B: "There is something nice".

Q: What have your big brother told you about how it is to go to school?
B: "That it's good".

Q: Do you know some of your new classmates in advance?
B: "Yes, a couple of girls, who are sweet". (That's not exactly how she said but the meaning is the same).

Q: Shall Prince Christian help you with your homework?
B: "No"!

Q: Prince Christian could write his own name when he started in 0. grade, can you also write your name?
B: "Yes, I can".

Isabella ended the interview by saying: "Thank you very much".

A little later Bella and her parents drove to school where the new 0. graders were recieved by the principal and older pupils singing in a choir. - I learned that the school has a mentor policy. That means that the 0. graders attach themselves to a pupil from 5th grade, who will look after the little one, give advise and help. So when Bella become a 5th grader herself, she will become a mentor.

Mary said: She is very ready for school. So there hasn't been much preparation. She's really ready and very good at writing". Frederik added that they had a most read a little in an ABC and run through the alphabet.
Isabelle will attend SFO, said Frederik: "She has good opportunities for that and she will now". (Referring to the All-Day-School to be implemented next year).
Princess Isabella seems to be a very sweet little girl, thank you for the translation of the interview. I particularly like this bit: "What's in the lunch bag?" "There is something nice". That's very cute!
__________________
"She is a little angel and like her name, she brings sunshine even on cloudy days. From the bottom of our hearts, we would like to thank each and every one of you for your lovely best wishes for our daughter. She feels very loved". HRH Princess Madeleine, Duchess of Hälsingland and Gästrikland on her daughter, HRH Princess Leonore, Duchess of Gotland.
Join my new group!
Reply With Quote
  #94  
Old 08-16-2013, 06:28 PM
kathia_sophia's Avatar
Royal Highness
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: South, Portugal
Posts: 1,708
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muhler View Post
Yep, six weeks of summer holiday. One week of winter holiday in February. One week of autumn holiday in October (week 42), three days of holiday around the Easter weekend. Christmas Holidays from 22 December to 2 January depending on weekdays. And a couple of holidays more during spring.
Yes I knew the Danish kids had a shorter summer holiday than their other European counterparts children. The Easter and Christmas holidays seem to match with my country's holidays, although the February winter holiday is not a week in my country but 3 days just because of the Carnival.
Now one thing that I didn't know was the Autumn holiday in October, that's knew to me.
__________________
♫A man is not old until regrets take the place of dreams.♥
Reply With Quote
  #95  
Old 08-16-2013, 10:18 PM
Juliette2's Avatar
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Boston, United States
Posts: 189
Parents sometimes are a problem in school and out of school!! I had an "encounter" with a 6-year old at the playground a few days ago which left me aghast. I was sitting far away and observed him bothering my (younger) son. I did not intervene. NOT AT ALL. When my son was fed up he came (visibly upset) closer to me. This rascal came to me to COMPLAIN that my son had not answered him how he was expecting about I don't know what. I started to explain a few things nicely to him but he was so rude, so disrespectful, (you have no idea!) it ended up with me raising my voice saying: " Now, you need to be quiet and listen to me because I'm an adult!". (His father was around somewhere by the way, I had seen him). Needless to say he looked at me like I was from Mars, turned around and went away. What kind of parent raises a brat like that??!!

So, I deeply feel for the teachers who need to face this kind of parents every day. Children just don't see adults as a source of authority/wisdom anymore. It's sad. That's why I think we are all so attracted to royalty because in a way, they still (or should) represent politeness, education, caring, understatement, etc.
Princess Christian and Isabella look exactly that: polite, energetic, happy, sweet children. Just children! It's funny, I was commenting with my husband the little press conference of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge on their exiting the hospital with their baby and we were saying how nobility was once considered classist, snob and presumptuous, while today these adjectives apply more toward reality tv participants than royals! Where do you find these days people so soft-spoken, witty, educated, humble (royals??) and caring?

Ok - sorry...I vented my frustration...!!
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #96  
Old 08-17-2013, 04:06 AM
Roskilde's Avatar
Royal Highness
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Roskilde, Denmark
Posts: 1,778
To all the English-speaking I found these gifs of charming Bella. The translations matches precisely.

http://31.media.tumblr.com/dbfa3e4cc...oeepo3_250.gif

http://31.media.tumblr.com/63199d9fc...oeepo4_250.gif

http://24.media.tumblr.com/7d17f3e97...oeepo2_250.gif

http://24.media.tumblr.com/be0c2cff1...oeepo1_250.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frelinghighness View Post
A new question. Are all of Isabella's skills in Danish? Is she only learning English in a spoken way when her mother speaks to her? Or is there no English at all in the home.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Archduchess Zelia View Post
I strongly believe that at least Christian and Isabella speak English (the twins are probably too young to fully master it, but I suppose they're learning it). There doesn't seem to be a language barrier when they spend time with Mary's family. However, I don't think that it is a Mary talking English and Frederik talking Danish to the kids kind of thing, like it is with Marie (in Marie's case, French) and Joachim.
Quote:
Originally Posted by GracieGiraffe View Post
I'm convinced the four kids are fluent in English. At least I'd hope so - what an advantage to have an English speaking mother!
I remember Mary has said she actually wish she was better to speak English with her children at home, but that she found it quite difficult because everything in their daily life is in Danish. Now it's some years ago and she said she would try to get better and maybe she has? To the photo session in Verbier last year we heard Isabella call Mary for 'mommy' instead of 'mor' in Danish, but it was also on a vacation where Mary's sister Jane was with them so they probably talked a lot English in that week.

I think that Mary learn her children English, step by step, as the years go by, but I don't think Mary speak much English with her children at home - everytime I hear or everytime I have heard Mary (and Frederik) and the children talk together, it has been in Danish. My feeling is, like Archduchess Zelia, that Christian and Isabella are good or fluent in English, but I doubt that Vincent and Josephine are it yet.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #97  
Old 08-17-2013, 04:28 AM
Muhler's Avatar
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Eastern Jutland, Denmark
Posts: 5,363
Quote:
Originally Posted by kathia_sophia View Post
Yes I knew the Danish kids had a shorter summer holiday than their other European counterparts children. The Easter and Christmas holidays seem to match with my country's holidays, although the February winter holiday is not a week in my country but 3 days just because of the Carnival.
Now one thing that I didn't know was the Autumn holiday in October, that's knew to me.
That holiday, always in week 42, used to be called the Potato Holiday. Because DK was a predominantly agricultural society until three generations ago, children were needed harvesting the potatoes and children were kept home from school anyway during the harvest, so it was decided to simply turn it into a mandatory school holiday.
The necessity of children during the potato harvest is explained very well in the British BBC series Edwardian Farm, which along with Victorian Farm and Wartime Farm can only be recommended. - Even for those who have no interest at all in agriculture.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Juliette2 View Post
Parents sometimes are a problem in school and out of school!! I had an "encounter" with a 6-year old at the playground a few days ago which left me aghast. I was sitting far away and observed him bothering my (younger) son. I did not intervene. NOT AT ALL. When my son was fed up he came (visibly upset) closer to me. This rascal came to me to COMPLAIN that my son had not answered him how he was expecting about I don't know what. I started to explain a few things nicely to him but he was so rude, so disrespectful, (you have no idea!) it ended up with me raising my voice saying: " Now, you need to be quiet and listen to me because I'm an adult!". (His father was around somewhere by the way, I had seen him). Needless to say he looked at me like I was from Mars, turned around and went away. What kind of parent raises a brat like that??!!

So, I deeply feel for the teachers who need to face this kind of parents every day. Children just don't see adults as a source of authority/wisdom anymore. It's sad. That's why I think we are all so attracted to royalty because in a way, they still (or should) represent politeness, education, caring, understatement, etc.
Princess Christian and Isabella look exactly that: polite, energetic, happy, sweet children. Just children! It's funny, I was commenting with my husband the little press conference of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge on their exiting the hospital with their baby and we were saying how nobility was once considered classist, snob and presumptuous, while today these adjectives apply more toward reality tv participants than royals! Where do you find these days people so soft-spoken, witty, educated, humble (royals??) and caring?

Ok - sorry...I vented my frustration...!!
I know your feeling. I wonder how the DRF handles such parents which they are bound to encounter. I can well imagine that Joachim and Frederik's patience is limited.

(Removed OT part)

You can't blame the children, but why is it so difficult for some parents to understand that children need boundaries? They do their children a disservice.

You are welcome, HereditaryPrincess
__________________
I love work, it absolutely fascinates me. I can sit for hours looking at people working.
Reply With Quote
  #98  
Old 08-17-2013, 06:54 AM
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 158
what a little cutie
she has the cutest little sturdy legs....and so happy. i cant believe she has grown so much.

:)
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #99  
Old 08-17-2013, 02:52 PM
Juliette2's Avatar
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Boston, United States
Posts: 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roskilde View Post
I remember Mary has said she actually wish she was better to speak English with her children at home, but that she found it quite difficult because everything in their daily life is in Danish. Now it's some years ago and she said she would try to get better and maybe she has? To the photo session in Verbier last year we heard Isabella call Mary for 'mommy' instead of 'mor' in Danish, but it was also on a vacation where Mary's sister Jane was with them so they probably talked a lot English in that week.
Speaking English is essential for anybody today and royal family members have always been excellent at speaking a number of languages. I was quite surprised at how good Queen Margarethe's English is. In fact, it's much better than Frederick! There's no doubt that all of Frederick and Mary's children will become more than fluent in English, though Danish will be their first language for obvious "institutional" reasons. Prince Christian also used to have an Australian nanny if I am not mistaken.
It is also a sensitive question. Of course, Mary will say that she speaks Danish almost 100% during the day. She has more pressure than, say, Princess Marie, because she will be a Queen of Denmark. My guess is that when she is alone with the children (one on one or all of them) she speaks English with them (and so she should!). It's wonderful that they'll have more than one language known at the native level.

I'm also pretty sure they will learn French fairly well especially being so close to their grandfather and cousins. And German will come along, too, in due course...
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #100  
Old 08-17-2013, 03:22 PM
Roskilde's Avatar
Royal Highness
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Roskilde, Denmark
Posts: 1,778
I definitely not think it is something Mary says, because she feels pressured to say so. I honestly believe that she speaks Danish with her children at home. I think she speaks English too, but I'm almost convinced that she mainly speaks Danish at home. But your bid is as good as mine, since we aren't a part of the their private situations
__________________

__________________
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
denamrk royals, first day of school, prince frederik, princess isabella, princess isabellas first day at school, princess mary, school


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Prince Sverre Magnus' first day at school, August 18, 2011 fairy tale Crown Prince Haakon & Crown Princess Mette-Marit and Family 19 10-04-2013 06:51 AM
Prince Christian's First Day of Primary School; August 12, 2011 Muhler Crown Prince Frederik and Crown Princess Mary and Family 121 08-26-2011 01:21 AM
Ingrid Alexandra's first day at school - August 19th 2010 Her_Majesty Crown Prince Haakon & Crown Princess Mette-Marit and Family 61 09-19-2010 08:59 AM




Popular Tags
abdication belgium birth brussels carl philip charlene chris o'neill crown prince frederik crown prince haakon crown princess mary crown princess mette-marit crown princess victoria current events engagement fashion genealogy grand duchess maria teresa grand duke henri hohenzollern infanta leonor infanta sofia jewellery jordan king carl xvi gustav king felipe king felipe vi king harald king juan carlos king philippe king willem-alexander luxembourg nobility official visit olympics ottoman pieter van vollenhoven president komorowski prince albert prince albert ii prince carl philip prince constantijn prince floris prince pieter-christiaan princess aimee princess anita princess beatrix princess charlene princess claire princess laurentien princess mabel princess margriet princess mary princess mary fashion queen letizia queen mathilde queen maxima queen rania queen silvia queen sofia royal royal fashion russia sofia hellqvist spain state visit sweden the hague visit wedding winter olympics 2014



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:41 PM.

Social Knowledge Networks

eXTReMe Tracker
Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2014
Jelsoft Enterprises

Royal News Delivered to your Email!

You can get the latest Royal News right in your inbox.

unsusbcribe at anytime with one click

Close [X]