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  #61  
Old 08-13-2013, 10:31 PM
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she is soooo pretty and this blue eyes like her father, stunning!!!!! I think she has a great personality and she did great with the photographers!!!!! I love her blouse!!!!only one question: why they went back to the palace, did they take her to the school by car?
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Old 08-14-2013, 01:51 AM
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So since she's 6 and a half, is the school more like our first grade in the States?
You know, that's a good question. The children I taught this past year are all starting kindergarten this September, and they're all pretty much able to do what Isabella can; they can write their names (at least spell last names, but most are able to write full name), count to twenty, recite the alphabet, recognize the upper and lower case letters as well as the sounds that they make, and pick out some words. These skills are what public schools expect here in NYC. It woud be great to find out if it's the same in Denmark.
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  #63  
Old 08-14-2013, 03:28 AM
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she is soooo pretty and this blue eyes like her father, stunning!!!!! I think she has a great personality and she did great with the photographers!!!!! I love her blouse!!!!only one question: why they went back to the palace, did they take her to the school by car?
Yes, they did. There is a clip somewhere. Where M&F are driving out of the gate, with Bella sitting behind. - Presumably Christian was already at school.

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You know, that's a good question. The children I taught this past year are all starting kindergarten this September, and they're all pretty much able to do what Isabella can; they can write their names (at least spell last names, but most are able to write full name), count to twenty, recite the alphabet, recognize the upper and lower case letters as well as the sounds that they make, and pick out some words. These skills are what public schools expect here in NYC. It woud be great to find out if it's the same in Denmark.
0 Grade is what beforhand was known as "børnehaveklasse = kindergarten-class" which is basically preschool. This is the transition between kindergarten and regular school and as such a mix of both.
I'd estimate that a little more than 90 % of all children in DK come straight from kindergarten or daycare. Some are fortunate to have dedicated parents like M&F who play and teach basic skills into them from home. Others are less fortunate and for those it may be quite a shock to go from kindergarten straight to sitting in a class. Others are still not mature enough so they may have to attend 0 grade again at an age where this will not be such a big personal defeat for them.
Tranegaards School is among the best state schools in DK. Partly due to the geographical location and partly due to the fact that strong and dedicated parents let their children attend this school, which again means that the school attract better teachers. It's a positive spiral, while other state schools of course have a negative spiral.
I'd estimate that Isabella's skills are average for 0 graders in that school and for the better half of state schools in general.

SFO = Skolefritidsordning = school-freetime-arrangement. Depending on age the children can, but are not required to, attend here after regular school hours under supervision. Here they can do their homework, play, hang out with friends and so on, until their parents get home from work or they go to something else like sports or simply go home.
That will change from next year where children will go to school for 30-37 hours a week and where there will be a blurred overlapping of regular classes and SFO and this is mandatory.

In DK children are obliged to attend school for ten years, starting with 0 grade and usually ending in 9th grade. (In my time 10th grade was normal, for eleven years at shool).
More than 90 % (the aim is 100 %) of all children who leave 9th grade go on to high school (more than 60 %), lasting three years or a branch related technical school, usually also lasting some three years or a continuation school, which is a kind of boarding school lasting one year, after which you are expected to attend either HF, which is a two year version of High School or a branch related school.
By now the pupils are 18-19 years old. Many take a year off, others go on to university or a more specialised technical school or a business school. Some get a job, others are eligible for conscription which today is practically 100 % voluntary and as such something they want. Some sign up for relief projects abroad, others will go sailing for a year and so on. With the majority finishing their education in their early to mid 20s.
We can expect this is something Isabella and the twins will do. - For Christian things will be a little different. He is basically required to join the military after high school and become an officer before going to the university.
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Old 08-14-2013, 09:33 AM
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Our little Bella in Huffington Post

Princess Isabella Is Too Stylish, Cute On Her First Day Of School (PHOTOS)

B.T.: Amerikansk avis hylder prinsesse Isabella på første skoledag: Et stilikon - Mode & skønhed | www.bt.dk
TV2: Amerikanerne falder i svime over prinsesse Isabella | GO'
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Old 08-14-2013, 11:19 AM
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Photos are soo beautifull!!!!!!! Lovely.
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Old 08-14-2013, 11:20 AM
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a nice little comparison between 2011 and 2013, Christian and Isabella's first day of school.

http://24.media.tumblr.com/fc81178cb19c9e2e835655683599e0ce/tumblr_mrhgwlzDBs1rajl9io1_500.png

love that Frederik wore the same suit jacket
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Old 08-14-2013, 11:29 AM
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Loved the pictures.
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Old 08-14-2013, 03:59 PM
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A nice picture of mother and daughter.. yes it was windy weather yesterday

http://24.media.tumblr.com/afca30928...4lwho1_500.png

*

Ekstra Bladet - Amerikanerne roser lille Isabella
Isabella's school bag is from Alpine and is actually one of the market's cheapest school bags. It costs 349 Danish kroner (about 47 euros) and can be bought in Toys'R'Us. Yet it is remarkably a bag of good quality. Several tests has given good score in terms of weight, fit, features and strength of straps and buckles.

My own daughter's school bag is an Alpine too and I will almost guarantee that Bella one day will run into another little schoolgirl with the same school bag as Alpine is very common among school bags for Danish children.
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Old 08-14-2013, 09:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Muhler View Post

SFO = Skolefritidsordning = school-freetime-arrangement. Depending on age the children can, but are not required to, attend here after regular school hours under supervision. Here they can do their homework, play, hang out with friends and so on, until their parents get home from work or they go to something else like sports or simply go home.
That will change from next year where children will go to school for 30-37 hours a week and where there will be a blurred overlapping of regular classes and SFO and this is mandatory.
Thanks Muhler for your explanation on the Danish educational system: most interesting.
30-37 hours a week in school is a lot!! It's sad that it's mandatory. So, both Isabella and Christian will stay in school for so many hours?

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A nice picture of mother and daughter.. yes it was windy weather yesterday

http://24.media.tumblr.com/afca30928...4lwho1_500.png
Pretty comparison! Doesn't Princess Isabella look much older that Prince Christian was? I guess it's true that girls are a bit ahead of boys!

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I would think that 30-37 hours at school a week would be pretty normal. If school starts at 9 and goes until 3 that's 6 hours a day, for 35 hours a week.
I suppose you are right. It's just that I am used to when I went to elementary school and I went for 20 hours a week and still got an excellent education. I think more hours do not necessarily make a better school or a better childhood experience. For a 6 year-old it seems a long day. Basically a regular work week (at least a French 35-hour work load!! ). I am stressing out about when my oldest one will start first grade next year!
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Old 08-14-2013, 09:39 PM
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Thanks Muhler for your explanation on the Danish educational system: most interesting.
30-37 hours a week in school is a lot!! It's sad that it's mandatory. So, both Isabella and Christian will stay in school for so many hours?
I would think that 30-37 hours at school a week would be pretty normal. If school starts at 9 and goes until 3 that's 6 hours a day, for 35 hours a week.
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Old 08-14-2013, 10:47 PM
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Isabella wont have that many hours of school - not in the first couple of years. Christian is getting there, but it still isn't too bad for him. When I was in 0 grade, I was in school from 8:00-11:55 am every day, and I can imagine that Bella's day is quite alike (though I don't know, Tranegårdsskolen might have different time tables than my old old school). That's a rough 18 hours a week which isn't too bad for a six year old. My sister, a fifth grader, has around 28 hours a week, more or less, which isn't too bad either. It isn't until you reach the higher grades that it gets tough (and then when you move on to the Danish High School it's just pure torture, I'm going back on Monday and I don't even want to think about my 8:00 am-5:55 pm days).
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Old 08-14-2013, 11:54 PM
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Isabella wont have that many hours of school - not in the first couple of years. Christian is getting there, but it still isn't too bad for him. When I was in 0 grade, I was in school from 8:00-11:55 am every day, and I can imagine that Bella's day is quite alike (though I don't know, Tranegårdsskolen might have different time tables than my old old school). That's a rough 18 hours a week which isn't too bad for a six year old. My sister, a fifth grader, has around 28 hours a week, more or less, which isn't too bad either. It isn't until you reach the higher grades that it gets tough (and then when you move on to the Danish High School it's just pure torture, I'm going back on Monday and I don't even want to think about my 8:00 am-5:55 pm days).
Danish high school runs from 8 to 5:55?
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Old 08-15-2013, 12:20 AM
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Danish high school runs from 8 to 5:55?
In my first semester of college, my Tuesday schedule was 8:00-6:00 with breaks from 9:30-11:00 and 12:30-2:00. I usually had mid-morning coffee during my first break and lunch during my second. I was exhausted by the end of the day; the good thing was I had Wednesdays off.
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Old 08-15-2013, 02:44 AM
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Yes, they did. There is a clip somewhere. Where M&F are driving out of the gate, with Bella sitting behind. - Presumably Christian was already at school.


Any chance you could post that clip? I cannot find it anywhere
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Old 08-15-2013, 03:45 AM
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Thanks Muhler for your explanation on the Danish educational system: most interesting.
30-37 hours a week in school is a lot!! It's sad that it's mandatory. So, both Isabella and Christian will stay in school for so many hours?

I suppose you are right. It's just that I am used to when I went to elementary school and I went for 20 hours a week and still got an excellent education. I think more hours do not necessarily make a better school or a better childhood experience. For a 6 year-old it seems a long day. Basically a regular work week (at least a French 35-hour work load!! ). I am stressing out about when my oldest one will start first grade next year!
Yes, and no, because they will stay in school but not recieving lessons all that time. It's an combination of regular class and SFO.
The government has passed a law called All-Day-School, where the aim is to ensure that the children are looked after for the whole of a normal workday, while at the same time increase the number of hours where they recieve lessons and also ensure that they get physical activity, can do their homework and play. Theme days can be longer and so on.
This will be implemented next year, although there will be local differencies as schools are administered locally but supervised on a government level.
The purpose is to highten the level of the pupils. - And that is certainly needed!

When Mrs. Muhler and I went to school, we had at the end 55 minutes in class for up to seven individual lessons a day. Now they have 45 minutes in class, usually merged to four 2 X 45 minutes lessons instead. And while a fifth grader today have learned to read and write, mathematics and English faster than we did, their basic skills are lower than in our time.
I've encounted quite a number of young people in my work straight from school, technical school or high school and many can't spell, basic grammar is out the window and they can't do simple calculations in their heads. Their basic knowledge about history and how the society works is at best just that, very basic. (I've had quite a few discussions with teachers about this. ).
I believe firmly in teaching the basic skills first, then build on top of that. So in many ways I welcome this change. However, I fear this new initiative will make little difference because I suspect there will de facto not be an increase of actual lessons. - It is the mindset among many parents, the teachers and pupils that needs to be changed anyway.

As it is now I'd guess Christian, a second grader, have some 4 hours in class every day, and then go to SFO for perhaps 2-3 hours afterwards. - So he is basically already there. That will now be made mandatory instead of voluntary.
For the older children, who already have 6-7 hours in school a day, it won't be much more. - The problem is that many older pupils work after school or attend a sports club. That time will now be more limited and many are fed up with school.
Another thing our political masters didn't consider is that from next year children will get off right in the beginning of the rush hour. For most it won't be a big problem as they attend a local school within comfortable cycling distance, but quite a number of children don't. So they have to board buses that are already full, cycle among suicidal adult cyclist, hoping that stressed drivers notice them.
And out here in the rural districts it's getting really dark around 15.30 in winter time. I'm pretty envious of the American uniformed schoolbus system which is way superiour to ours.

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Originally Posted by ghost_night554 View Post
Any chance you could post that clip? I cannot find it anywhere
IIRC it was on the TV2 news at 19.00. - Perhaps others can help finding that clip?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roskilde View Post
A nice picture of mother and daughter.. yes it was windy weather yesterday

http://24.media.tumblr.com/afca30928...4lwho1_500.png

*

Ekstra Bladet - Amerikanerne roser lille Isabella
Isabella's school bag is from Alpine and is actually one of the market's cheapest school bags. It costs 349 Danish kroner (about 47 euros) and can be bought in Toys'R'Us. Yet it is remarkably a bag of good quality. Several tests has given good score in terms of weight, fit, features and strength of straps and buckles.

My own daughter's school bag is an Alpine too and I will almost guarantee that Bella one day will run into another little schoolgirl with the same school bag as Alpine is very common among school bags for Danish children.
Thanks, Roskilde.

This one is pretty funny, come to think of it.
That story has been in all the major newspapers yesterday.

We Danes still become very flattered (and surprised too, I think) when someone in the big world notice something positive that is going on in our little village. - Even if it is in just one, albeit wellknown, American magazine. Or when a foreign magazine write something flattering about the style of our princesses.
Oh yes, the village mentallity is very much alive and well, also among those of us who think they don't possess it.

And just for the record I find it nice too and I find the village mantallity charming. It would be much worse if we where so aloof we didn't care what the outside world thought of us.
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  #76  
Old 08-15-2013, 05:35 AM
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Pretty comparison! Doesn't Princess Isabella look much older that Prince Christian was? I guess it's true that girls are a bit ahead of boys!
IIRC Christian was not yet 6 years old when he started school, as he is born on 15 October. At that age a few months can make quite a difference. But I thought that Christian was actually very self-confident and eloquent for his age.
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Old 08-15-2013, 12:43 PM
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Yes, and no, because they will stay in school but not recieving lessons all that time. It's an combination of regular class and SFO.
The government has passed a law called All-Day-School, where the aim is to ensure that the children are looked after for the whole of a normal workday, while at the same time increase the number of hours where they recieve lessons and also ensure that they get physical activity, can do their homework and play. Theme days can be longer and so on.
This will be implemented next year, although there will be local differencies as schools are administered locally but supervised on a government level.
The purpose is to highten the level of the pupils. - And that is certainly needed!

When Mrs. Muhler and I went to school, we had at the end 55 minutes in class for up to seven individual lessons a day. Now they have 45 minutes in class, usually merged to four 2 X 45 minutes lessons instead. And while a fifth grader today have learned to read and write, mathematics and English faster than we did, their basic skills are lower than in our time.
I've encounted quite a number of young people in my work straight from school, technical school or high school and many can't spell, basic grammar is out the window and they can't do simple calculations in their heads. Their basic knowledge about history and how the society works is at best just that, very basic. (I've had quite a few discussions with teachers about this. ).
I believe firmly in teaching the basic skills first, then build on top of that. So in many ways I welcome this change. However, I fear this new initiative will make little difference because I suspect there will de facto not be an increase of actual lessons. - It is the mindset among many parents, the teachers and pupils that needs to be changed anyway.

As it is now I'd guess Christian, a second grader, have some 4 hours in class every day, and then go to SFO for perhaps 2-3 hours afterwards. - So he is basically already there. That will now be made mandatory instead of voluntary.
For the older children, who already have 6-7 hours in school a day, it won't be much more. - The problem is that many older pupils work after school or attend a sports club. That time will now be more limited and many are fed up with school.
Another thing our political masters didn't consider is that from next year children will get off right in the beginning of the rush hour. For most it won't be a big problem as they attend a local school within comfortable cycling distance, but quite a number of children don't. So they have to board buses that are already full, cycle among suicidal adult cyclist, hoping that stressed drivers notice them.
And out here in the rural districts it's getting really dark around 15.30 in winter time. I'm pretty envious of the American uniformed schoolbus system which is way superiour to ours.
I've heard rumors that New York City will start on something similar to what's happening in Denmark next year; they want an extended school day to make sure that US is not falling behind other countries, though in my opinion, more instructional time doesn't always mean better achievement. Kids get tired, teachers get tired, and that only leads to frustration, and lack of motivation. I taught from September until this past Tuesday, and even though we didn't have extended day (I'm only a preschool teacher), the amount of time spent in the classroom was extremely taxing for all involved. I think that instead of making the day/year longer, they need to look at the actual system, and perhaps get rid of those pesky standardized tests.

As to people knowing very little in terms of grammar, simple arithmetic, and history, believe me, I've met teachers who lack basic knowledge in these areas. It's very sad, because when you have teachers who lack basic skills, you'll also have a full generation of students who lack them as well. I give myself credit for being what is labeled as a 'nerd', because what I know helps me a great deal in the classroom, and I can pass on some of that random knowledge onto my students (who happened to love looking at pictures of the Cathedral of Notre Dame in Paris, and the Cathedral of St. Basil in Red Square when we did our 'travel the world' unit over the summer).
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Old 08-15-2013, 12:56 PM
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I've heard rumors that New York City will start on something similar to what's happening in Denmark next year; they want an extended school day to make sure that US is not falling behind other countries, though in my opinion, more instructional time doesn't always mean better achievement. Kids get tired, teachers get tired, and that only leads to frustration, and lack of motivation. I taught from September until this past Tuesday, and even though we didn't have extended day (I'm only a preschool teacher), the amount of time spent in the classroom was extremely taxing for all involved. I think that instead of making the day/year longer, they need to look at the actual system, and perhaps get rid of those pesky standardized tests.

As to people knowing very little in terms of grammar, simple arithmetic, and history, believe me, I've met teachers who lack basic knowledge in these areas. It's very sad, because when you have teachers who lack basic skills, you'll also have a full generation of students who lack them as well. I give myself credit for being what is labeled as a 'nerd', because what I know helps me a great deal in the classroom, and I can pass on some of that random knowledge onto my students (who happened to love looking at pictures of the Cathedral of Notre Dame in Paris, and the Cathedral of St. Basil in Red Square when we did our 'travel the world' unit over the summer).
From what I understand, the point of the new school system is that the children won't have to sit in a classroom for four hours straight at Isabella's age. That they'll have longer breaks to play and that there should be more room for different kinds of learning, so all the children will benefit. If they learn by touching and building or by physical activity, then there'll be lessons that plays to their strengths too, instead of just benefiting the children who are good at sitting still and listening in a classroom. We'll have to wait and see if the reform will work as intended.
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Old 08-15-2013, 02:14 PM
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IIRC it was on the TV2 news at 19.00. - Perhaps others can help finding that clip?


Thanks Muhler. No wonder I couldn't find it on here.

It's crazy both Isabella and Christian now both go to school. Guess we have the twins to look forward to next.
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Old 08-15-2013, 02:41 PM
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Danish high school runs from 8 to 5:55?
I take the Higher Preparatory Examination which basically means that where regular High School students finish their education in three years, we only have two years (as Muhler mentioned in a post). Therefore our days are a bit longer than the regular High School students, but a couple of 8-5:55 days a week certainly aren't uncommon in the Danish High School
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