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  #501  
Old 11-11-2012, 07:10 PM
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Thank you so much Muhler for your prompt reply...I knew you would come through for me...I was thinking it would be spelt something like uffatelig...so voldsudøvende is quite surprising...I am attempting to teach myself Danish using Jakob Martin Strid kids books and some Danish music but if words that look like voldsudøvende sound like oo-oo-veh-neh then I am in for a enormous challenge...Makes me appreciate what Mary and Marie and Henrik have had to do in marrying their respective Danish spouses...Sheesh! :)
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  #502  
Old 11-11-2012, 07:23 PM
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You are welcome.

However, had I not known about that episode I too would have believed the word you described was "uvenner" = litterally un-friends, i.e. former friends or friends who have had a major row.
And that would of course not be translated to English as perpetrator.
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  #503  
Old 11-12-2012, 08:02 AM
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A better word than "committing" would be "practicing" as in "practicing medicine".

"Udøver" is a more neutral word in Danish as you can "udøve" violence, first aid, art, fitness, etc.

"Commits" is more along the lines of "begå" also indicating a crime or some other deplorable act (i.e. a word with a non-neutral weight).
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  #504  
Old 11-12-2012, 08:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Muhler View Post
I learned recently of another word from the show Time Team. They were digging out Bronce Age graves, which the archeologists called: "a kist/kiste". That's a stone lined grave with a big stone slab on top.
The funny thing is that the Danish word for coffin, is "kiste".
I wonder if "kiste" went out of use in England, to be substituted with a new French/Normannic word: coffin?
In German a "Kiste" is a box made from wood. Or colloquial for "coffin", if you want to use it in a light, jokey mode. Like in "Wir landen alle mal in der Kiste" - we all land eventually in a wooden box. OTOH Kiste, too, means "bed", so the same sentence could mean: "we all will have sex one day". Well, beds used to resemble boxes, too (pre-IKEA, that is).
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  #505  
Old 11-12-2012, 09:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nwinther View Post
A better word than "committing" would be "practicing" as in "practicing medicine".

"Udøver" is a more neutral word in Danish as you can "udøve" violence, first aid, art, fitness, etc.

"Commits" is more along the lines of "begå" also indicating a crime or some other deplorable act (i.e. a word with a non-neutral weight).
Yeah, I think you are right.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kataryn View Post
In German a "Kiste" is a box made from wood. Or colloquial for "coffin", if you want to use it in a light, jokey mode. Like in "Wir landen alle mal in der Kiste" - we all land eventually in a wooden box. OTOH Kiste, too, means "bed", so the same sentence could mean: "we all will have sex one day". Well, beds used to resemble boxes, too (pre-IKEA, that is).
Thanks for making me smile.
Just to make it even more confusing for Mary and other poor souls trying to learn Danish, a "skibskiste" means a (ships-)chest, a box generally used for travelling or storage.
I read Daniel Defoe's A Journal of the Plague Year some time back. Considering that the book was writting in the early 1700's I was utterly astonished to learn how many words I recogniced, that are used in modern German and Scandinavian but are now archaic in English
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