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  #4121  
Old 03-27-2011, 11:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Iluvbertie View Post
I have never been to a wedding where the wedding cake wasn't a fruitcake. The guests are usually given a small piece to take home with them. It isn't the dessert at all. My mother used the top tier of her wedding cake for my brother's Christening Cake and he did the same with his first child.
Ausie fruitcake is just as bad as British, yuck. When we were volunteering planting trees, I think on French island, the people we were working for would have us up to their home for coffee breaks. At least one fed us it. I was always taught when someone puts something in front of you, you eat it, grin and bear it, and tell them how delicious it is.

I think if Kate chose anything but fruit cake, she'd just not tell the public. She'd make the cake designer say it was fruitcake, cause less controversy. I think cake flavors should be something the bride and groom chooses, not some old tradition, but that's just me.
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  #4122  
Old 03-27-2011, 11:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iluvbertie View Post
I have never been to a wedding where the wedding cake wasn't a fruitcake. The guests are usually given a small piece to take home with them. It isn't the dessert at all. My mother used the top tier of her wedding cake for my brother's Christening Cake and he did the same with his first child.
So what is the dessert at a wedding, then? Or do Brits not have desserts at weddings? Is a wedding the only formal occasion without a dessert?

I've never been to a wedding where there was a fruitcake, so I'm guessing we've uncovered some true cultural divide between England and its North American colonies - because I've been to Canadian weddings.

Canadians, though, perhaps of the Western Canadian branch. Do Canadians have fruitcake at the wedding?

And am I properly picturing this? A fruitcake with wedding icing (fondant, right?)
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  #4123  
Old 03-27-2011, 11:55 PM
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fruit cake would not be my choice, and by the fact that they chose another option, neither is theirs, apparently. although the idea of saving one part to be eaten at the christening of the first child sound really nice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by melissaadrian View Post
Another North American bringing Diana into the mix. This article is revisiting Diana's wedding, and how it can be modernized for today.

Royal Wedding Photos - Yahoo! Shine Canada#
Who comes up if these ideas?
btw, saw on Facebook a page created call "The Royal Wedding drinking game", and one of the times you are supposed to turn the glass, is every time Diana is mentioned. I predict the majority of people playing this will be drunk after 10 minutes.
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  #4124  
Old 03-28-2011, 12:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrincessKaimi View Post
So what is the dessert at a wedding, then? Or do Brits not have desserts at weddings? Is a wedding the only formal occasion without a dessert?

I've never been to a wedding where there was a fruitcake, so I'm guessing we've uncovered some true cultural divide between England and its North American colonies - because I've been to Canadian weddings.

Canadians, though, perhaps of the Western Canadian branch. Do Canadians have fruitcake at the wedding?

And am I properly picturing this? A fruitcake with wedding icing (fondant, right?)

The desserts I have had have been pavlovas, cheesecakes, other pudding type desserts with custard/or and ice cream etc. A normal dessert really.

The fruitcake would have icing and decorations on it certainly. I couldn't imagine having any other sort of cake at a wedding.
  #4125  
Old 03-28-2011, 12:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sproketti View Post
What does the William & Kate - A Royal Wedding candle from Yankee Candle smell like? I knew they were selling it in England but my sister saw it at a YC store not far from where I live recently.
A timeless tale of young love told through a sophisticated and soothing blend of florals and subtle fruits...

A Royal Wedding - Large Jar Candle : Yankee Candle
  #4126  
Old 03-28-2011, 12:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrincessKaimi View Post
So what is the dessert at a wedding, then? Or do Brits not have desserts at weddings? Is a wedding the only formal occasion without a dessert?

I've never been to a wedding where there was a fruitcake, so I'm guessing we've uncovered some true cultural divide between England and its North American colonies - because I've been to Canadian weddings.

Canadians, though, perhaps of the Western Canadian branch. Do Canadians have fruitcake at the wedding?

And am I properly picturing this? A fruitcake with wedding icing (fondant, right?)
No we most certainly don't. Well I mean perhaps some very British Canadians might, but my Grandmother was as british as they come and none of her sons had fruit cake wedding cakes. Our cakes are the same as American, cupcakes are becoming popular though.

Iluvbertie is an Aussie though, or so their profile says, so it isn't simply the English. And I believe someone said Kiwis do as well.

I have seen weddings where they give little custom made individual cakes as the party gift, instead of mints or what ever. And there usually is a desert table at all the weddings I have been too, pasteries and other treats other than the cake. I have a feeling that is the Australian way of things, had their fruit cake but never been to an Aussie wedding, so not certain. The fruit cake for at least Kate and will, is going to be fondant and decorated.
  #4127  
Old 03-28-2011, 12:43 AM
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So fruitcake hmm interesting never tried it. My dad and mom both have and verdict is mom hates it dad doesn't mind it. I'd much prefer the chocolate cake though. If I was a guest I know which one I'd go for.

ETA: so I watched the TLC special tonight(first off I have to say I'm sorry but I can't upload it or atleast not right now I'm WAY too busy with school, maybe later..) but we got to see inside BP and it was cool to finally see how the wedding breakfast/reception will look like. In all honestly it's MUCH bigger then it looks in the pictures.
  #4128  
Old 03-28-2011, 01:36 AM
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they fruit cake with fresh fruits? where are the fresh fruit ? incorporated inside the cake? so it's not really a traditional fruit cake, is it?
  #4129  
Old 03-28-2011, 01:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ghost_night554 View Post
So fruitcake hmm interesting never tried it. My dad and mom both have and verdict is mom hates it dad doesn't mind it. I'd much prefer the chocolate cake though. If I was a guest I know which one I'd go for.

ETA: so I watched the TLC special tonight(first off I have to say I'm sorry but I can't upload it or atleast not right now I'm WAY too busy with school, maybe later..) but we got to see inside BP and it was cool to finally see how the wedding breakfast/reception will look like. In all honestly it's MUCH bigger then it looks in the pictures.
No problem, I can wait :P
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  #4130  
Old 03-28-2011, 01:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rosapru View Post
they fruit cake with fresh fruits? where are the fresh fruit ? incorporated inside the cake? so it's not really a traditional fruit cake, is it?
It is a traditional fruit cake, just decorated. This is what I found.

English Traditions

Getting Married in Great Brittain

Wedding flowers are scattered by a small girl preceding the English bride and her wedding party, who walk together to the wedding chapel or the wedding site. The flowered path and symbolic walk express hope for the bride's path through life to be happy and lovely. English bridesmaids wear wedding dresses very much like the bride's, so she cannot be singled out by any jealous evil wishers, who might curse her for her happiness.

Brides sew a good luck charm, such as the silver horseshoe of royal British brides, to the hem of their wedding dresses. Old English wedding tradition also calls for the bride to carry a horseshoe, streaming with ribbons, for good luck.

English Wedding Ceremony

Traditionally, an English couple getting married will exchange their vows outside the wedding chapel doorway, allowing the ceremony to be witnessed by anyone who might want to watch.

Traditional English Wedding Receptions

Traditional English wedding cake is a fruitcake, usually made with raisins, ground almonds, cherries and marzipan. The top layer of the wedding cake is called the "christening cake" which the couple is saves for the baptism of their first child.

The fruitcake is served at the wedding reception along with another traditional cake -- the groom's cake -- which originated during the Tudor period. It was once English custom for this to be a fruitcake as well, but today, the groom's cake is likely to be chocolate.

A unique Victorian wedding reception event is called a 'ribbon pull'. A sterling silver charm is purchased for each of the bridesmaids. A ribbon is tied to each one, and the baker places them between layers of the wedding cake as it is being assembled. Before the bride and groom share their first slice of cake, the bridesmaids gather so that ech can pull one ribbon, claiming for herself a future good promise.

The wedding tradition of tying shoes to the cars of newlyweds also began in England during the Tudor period. Originally, wedding reception guests threw shoes at the newlyweds as they were leaving the church for good luck. The modern tradition is to tie shoes to the honeymoon vehicle. The English consider rain on a wedding day a sign of good fortune.

Below are three recipes. The first is an English fruit cake recipe without brandy and the next two are for the traditional English wedding cake with brandy.

English Fruit Cake

1 lb. butter
2 tablespoons milk
1 lb. light brown sugar
3 lbs. currants
9 eggs
2 lbs. raisins, seeded and finely chopped
1 lb. flour
2 teaspoons mace
1/2 lb. almonds, blanched and shredded
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1 teaspoon soda
1 lb. citron, thinly sliced and cut in strips

Cream the butter, add sugar gradually, and beat thoroughly. Separate yolks from whites of eggs; beat yolks until thick and lemon-colored, whites until stiff and dry, and add to first mixture. Then add milk, fruit, nuts, and flour mixed and sifted with mace, cinnamon, and soda. Put in buttered deep pans, cover with buttered paper, steam three hours, and bake one and one half hours in a slow oven, or bake four hours in a
very slow oven. Rich fruit cake is always more satisfactory when done if the cooking is accomplished by steaming.
----------------------------------------…
Wedding Cake I

1 lb. butter
1/2 teaspoon clove
1 lb. sugar
3 lbs. raisins, seeded and cut in pieces
12 eggs
1 lb. flour
1 lb. currants
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1 lb. citron, thinly sliced and cut in strips
Nutmeg, Allspice, Mace, 3/4 teaspoon each
1 lb. figs, finely chopped
1/4 cup brandy
2 tablespoons lemon juice

Cream the butter, add sugar gradually, and beat thoroughly. Separate yolks from whites of eggs, beat yolks until thick and lemon-colored, whites until stiff and dry, and add to first mixture. Add flour (excepting one-third cup, which should be reserved to dredge fruit) mixed and sifted with spices, brandy, and lemon juice. Then add fruit, except citron,
dredged with reserved flour. Dredge citron with flour and put in layers between cake mixture when putting in the pan.
Bake same as English Fruit Cake. ----------------------------------------…
Wedding Cake II

1 lb. butter
3 lbs. raisins, seeded and cut in pieces
1 lb. brown sugar
12 eggs
2 lbs. Sultana raisins
1 cup molasses
1 1/2 lbs. citron, thinly sliced and cut in strips
1 lb. flour
4 teaspoons cinnamon
1 lb. currants
4 teaspoons allspice
1/2 preserved lemon rind
1 1/2 teaspoons mace
1/2 preserved orange rind
1 nutmeg, grated
1 cup brandy
1/4 teaspoon soda
4 squares chocolate, melted
1 tablespoon hot water

Cream the butter, add sugar gradually, and beat thoroughly. Separate yolks from whites of eggs, and beat yolks until thick and lemon-colored. Add to first mixture, then add flour (excepting one third cup, which should be reserved to dredge fruit), mixed and sifted with spices, fruit dredged with flour, lemon rind and orange rind finely chopped, brandy, chocolate, and whites of eggs beaten until stiff and dry. Just before putting into pans, add soda dissolved in hot water. Cover pans with buttered paper, and steam four hours. Finish cooking by leaving in a warm oven over night.

*************************************
Royal icing gets its name from having been the traditional icing for fruitcake -- which was the wedding cake of choice among English royalty, and then among the general English population. Along with marzipan, fondant, and other rolled or formed icings, it has the advantage of sealing in freshness so that the cake in question could be made days in advance and still be tasty and moist upon serving. If a wedding cake needs to be made more than a few days in advance, royal icing is frequently used in tandem with fondant, which is cut and formed to fit exactly the particular dimensions of the cake.

1 lb. confectioner's sugar
1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar
2 1/2 teaspoons pure vanilla, orange, peppermint or whatever extract you prefer
3 large egg whites
3 to 6 drops edible glycerin (optional)

-- Sift together the confectioner's sugar and cream of tartar 2 or 3 times. Do not skip this step, or you will have unattractive tiny white lumps throughout the icing.

-- In a large bowl, mix all ingredients until combined. You will despair at first, because the extract will make the icing look muddy or grey; never fear, as a good beating will incorporate enough air into the icing to turn it snowy white again. Set mixer speed on highest level and mix for at least 3 minutes. Use immediately.
Source(s):

http://www.worldweddingtraditions.com/lo…
http://www.hungrybrowser.com/phaedrus/m0…
http://www.wordbanquet.com/icing.html

The horse shoe part seemed odd, but Camilla wore one. Or at least I think she did. When she was leaving after the blessing, it looks like she has a horse shoe hanging from her wrist in a photo or two.
  #4131  
Old 03-28-2011, 02:20 AM
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So it's not the gawd awful cake with the red and green candied cherries and pineapple? Hmmm... maybe I could choke down a piece after all.

As far as the horseshoe goes, Diana had a small one sewn into the waistband of her gown, if memory serves.
  #4132  
Old 03-28-2011, 02:31 AM
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Gosh so much has been said about fruitcakes since I went to bed last night!!!

Here in the UK a traditional rich fruit wedding cake is becoming less and less common with people opting for chocolate, vanilla or other sponges just like in the US and I think Canada. In fact, I would guess that most wedding cakes here in the UK are not fruitcake.

There are many different types of fruitcake, some rich and heavy (yes, useful for a doorstop!) and others lighter with less fruit, whcih are eaten for afternoon tea.

For many weddings in the UK, there is a meal (usually three courses) which include a dessert such as a gateaux or pudding. After the meal, the wedding cake is cut and pieces are passed around to guests either to eat there and then or placed in a small box and taken away. If a rich fruitcake is used as the wedding cake, some people post slices of it to friends and family living away who couldn;t make the wedding. When I was young, on a couple of occassions distant relatives got married and sent a slice of wedding cake in the post and I loved it!

The US is a great influence on the types of cakes available now here in the UK including the hugely popular cupcakes. A number of people I know have had a wedding cake made up entirely of hundreds of cupcakes all placed on tiered platters.
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  #4133  
Old 03-28-2011, 02:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dutch View Post
So it's not the gawd awful cake with the red and green candied cherries and pineapple? Hmmm... maybe I could choke down a piece after all.

As far as the horseshoe goes, Diana had a small one sewn into the waistband of her gown, if memory serves.
The cherries are in it, they were listed, but pineapple is not too traditional. Well I never stopped to look at Canadian ones, have abroad, the rare one we get is likely in the freezer for years to come, or pigeon food. Good doorstop as someone mentioned.

And to the poster below, Canadian cakes are the same as American. I have also seen the cupcakes. It allows for more flavors to be used. And some people say more get eaten. People feel odd cutting into the big wedding cake, cupcakes are more appealing to some. I could see doing them.

I think the horse shoe was just a bit more noticeable for Camilla, as she actually wore it like a bracelet, out in the open.
  #4134  
Old 03-28-2011, 04:27 AM
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The weddings i've been to in the UK, you've had cake but also other deserts like cheesecake, pavlova etc. I would love a Charm City Cake when I get married :)
Not having a traditional fruitcake would have had no bearing on peoples opinion on Kate, it's a cake.
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Old 03-28-2011, 06:16 AM
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Royal wedding: Prince William slips off for a secret country stag - Telegraph

Royal wedding: Prince William slips off for a secret country stag

When Prince William chose his brother Prince Harry to be his best man, he may have expected he would spend his stag party downing cocktails in the public eye at some of London's fashionable nightspots
  #4136  
Old 03-28-2011, 06:17 AM
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I am so glad that William has managed to have a low-key stag do, away from the press and public intrusion.
  #4137  
Old 03-28-2011, 06:58 AM
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Is it just me.... because i don't recall ever readding that Charles and Diana's wedding cake was fruit cake. I would have thought I would remember something like that?
  #4138  
Old 03-28-2011, 07:27 AM
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Knit your own Royal Wedding - Telegraph

I find that hilarious - has it allready been posted?

I'll sort through my woolen basket tonight Just love it. What do you think?
  #4139  
Old 03-28-2011, 08:41 AM
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There was an article in the Washington Post newspaper about the confusion Americans face when having to understand that marrying a prince doesn't automatically make you a princess and how becoming the duke of something after a marriage isn't a demotion from the job/title of prince even though it sounds like it to Americans, and how and why various titles are come by and what this has to do with what William and Kate will be known as after the wedding.

The writer of the article was saying that Americans often feel a connection with the people of Great Britain, as if we are practically the same people, until we are faced with the startling proof that we are really very different, such as when traditions come up. The writer compares that culture shock to standing in a store in Scotland and suddenly realizing they don't sell Oreos.

The article should have been about wedding cakes instead of titles!
  #4140  
Old 03-28-2011, 08:48 AM
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Yes, that article has been posted and discussed in this thread http://www.theroyalforums.com/forums...es-258-43.html .
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