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  #821  
Old 05-09-2015, 10:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Princess of Durham View Post
People cannot seem to accept the fact that everyone is different. With my first child I could very well have done what Kate did. I had minimal medication/sedation and I think that makes a huge difference. As to the "surrogacy" theories I think that is just an excuse to make such comments because there were people saying that BEFORE she had George. It seems for some people if you are not enormous during your pregnancy then CERTAINLY you must have had a surrogate. Just more excuses to bad mouth Catherine, IMO.
I think most women with straightforward labours and no post partum complications could do what Kate did. Someone did her hair and makeup, she got dressed in the clothes someone else brought her, maybe walked to the hospital exit, (she could well have been pushed in a wheelchair up to then), stood outside with the baby and smiled for a minute or two before getting into the car and being driven to her home, where supportive family and staff were waiting to take care of her every need.
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  #822  
Old 05-09-2015, 10:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Isabella View Post
Oh, yes, I realize we're talking post-birth. I think part of the reason it makes me slightly worried about leaving so soon is because when I was born, my mother was only in labor for 6 hours, and it was a straightforward, normal birth. However, my mother did have some relatively minor, non-life threatening complications afterward (although I don't think they were immediately apparent), and she ended up staying in the hospital for 6 days. I've also heard of cases where women developed complications at home but didn't realize how serious they were because they weren't accustomed to what's considered normal, whereas a medical professional would be. Of course, I realize a lot of people (especially royals) are surrounded with help of various kinds once they get home, be it a nurse or family members.

Edit to add: I see you added a couple of things - interesting about the post-birth care. I don't think it's the norm to have nurse check-ups at home in the US, which is perhaps why the hospital stays are longer.

Interesting about the conspiracy theories - do they have similar theories about other royal ladies who leave the hospital so soon? Because I know Kate's not the only one, but I realize a lot of people don't pay attention to other royal families.
You raise an interesting point about women not necessarily recognizing abnormal symptoms. I think that is why Catherine stayed in the hospital a little longer with George.

Regarding the high heels, I probably could have done it but there was no incentive--the world's media wasn't waiting at my door.
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  #823  
Old 05-09-2015, 10:30 PM
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Originally Posted by camelot23ca View Post
I think most women with straightforward labours and no post partum complications could do what Kate did. Someone did her hair and makeup, she got dressed in the clothes someone else brought her, maybe walked to the hospital exit, (she could well have been pushed in a wheelchair up to then), stood outside with the baby and smiled for a minute or two before getting into the car and being driven to her home, where supportive family and staff were waiting to take care of her every need.
Really? Honestly, the consensus of most women I know was that they couldn't imagine (and I won't go into all the reasons why they felt that way, but it certainly gave me a new understanding of why it might not be such a comfortable thing to do). I was sitting and watching the TV with my mother as Kate left the hospital with Charlotte, and my mother nearly passed out when she saw that Kate was wearing high-heels so soon after giving birth, and she was swapping stories with some other people who felt the same way. Obviously Kate had help getting dressed, etc., but I'm not sure it would be so comfortable to be dressed up at that moment, even if it is only for a few minutes. Of course, Kate might not have felt comfortable at all, and perhaps you're right that most women could do it if they were in her situation.
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  #824  
Old 05-09-2015, 10:38 PM
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The point is, I don't think women realize what they can do if they HAD to. All the difference in the world. It was only for a few minutes but I'm sure she was very glad to get home and into comfy clothes and probably bed or at least "reclining".
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  #825  
Old 05-09-2015, 11:48 PM
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Hospitals are great when and if you need them, but they are also full of superbugs which are resistant to antibiotics. The best thing is to give birth there, so if you have complications, you've got the best care available at hand. If everything goes well and you have support at home - the best is to go home as soon as your medical team says you can. You and your baby are at risk because you are both vulnerable. Sad, but true.
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  #826  
Old 05-10-2015, 12:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Isabella View Post

Edit to add: I see you added a couple of things - interesting about the post-birth care. I don't think it's the norm to have nurse check-ups at home in the US, which is perhaps why the hospital stays are longer.

There is a huge difference in maternity care from country to country. I trained as a midwife (not nurse please) in the UK and also worked as one in Australia.

In Britain it is (or was when I practiced) law that all post partum mothers and neonates must be examined by a midwife (not nurse) twice a day for three days and then daily for a further 7 days. Districts can then continue visiting until 28 days post partum if necessary. My district visited on day 14 & day 21 and more often if necessary.

This would be why the midwife was seen going in on Sunday and probably why they stayed a couple of days in London.

You simply cannot compare the situation in, say the U.S. with the situation in the UK.


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  #827  
Old 05-10-2015, 12:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QueenJen View Post
Hospitals are great when and if you need them, but they are also full of superbugs which are resistant to antibiotics. The best thing is to give birth there, so if you have complications, you've got the best care available at hand. If everything goes well and you have support at home - the best is to go home as soon as your medical team says you can. You and your baby are at risk because you are both vulnerable. Sad, but true.

Excellent point!

Regarding Kate wearing high heels, people are aware that her uterus is not in her feet, right?
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  #828  
Old 05-10-2015, 01:09 AM
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I used the term 'nurse' because I was under the impression (based on my sister-in-law who is a nurse and a midwife and couldn't become a midwife until she had completed her general nursing course) that midwives were also nurses.
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  #829  
Old 05-10-2015, 01:19 AM
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I thought Kaye wore flats when she left with George. And Kate wasn't that small in the last months before George was born, she looked like she had swallowed the great pumpkin, like most women do. Plus both times she has shown her stomach is still big after her babies were born.
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  #830  
Old 05-10-2015, 01:28 AM
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Catherine wore wedges when leaving the hospital with George. Also, she had a good nights rest after giving birth to him and had some energy to talk to the press afterwards. This time around, Catherine left the hospital just a few hours after giving birth to Charlotte. I totally understood why she and William didn't talk to the press this time. You could tell Catherine was tired, but she pushes herself through it all with a nice smile and happiness. I can tell that she's a strong woman.
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  #831  
Old 05-10-2015, 01:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XeniaCasaraghi View Post
I thought Kaye wore flats when she left with George. And Kate wasn't that small in the last months before George was born, she looked like she had swallowed the great pumpkin, like most women do. Plus both times she has shown her stomach is still big after her babies were born.
She wore wedges when she left the hospital with George. I was impressed with the heels though my older niece, who worked for about a year as a Medical Assistant in an OB-GYN's office, didn't seem too impressed when we were chatting about it last night.
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  #832  
Old 05-10-2015, 01:38 AM
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It has been a very busy few days w/getting ready to come down here to Toronto for my Annual Canadian Stars on Ice Trip, so talk about playing catch up w/the thread...Wow!!

Now...Speaking of Toronto...I'm going to be down here for a couple more days and would love to get a piece of china marking the little Sweetheart's Birth for my Collection. However, I haven't got a clue where to go in Toronto to find something like that. So if anyone in the Toronto area could help me out, it would be appreciated very much, just keep in mind I'm in the Downtown Core and it needs to be easily accessible too.

Thanks in advance!!


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  #833  
Old 05-10-2015, 02:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QueenJen View Post
Hospitals are great when and if you need them, but they are also full of superbugs which are resistant to antibiotics. The best thing is to give birth there, so if you have complications, you've got the best care available at hand. If everything goes well and you have support at home - the best is to go home as soon as your medical team says you can. You and your baby are at risk because you are both vulnerable. Sad, but true.

You are right. I used to believe that large, modern hospitals were the cleanest, most sterile places on the planet. Then I became desperately ill with a 105 degree temperature less than 24 hours after routine gynecological surgery. Instead of staying for 2 days as originally scheduled I was there a week. I was miserable.

A new mom might cherish the restful reprieve of a longer hospital stay, but I agree with you. If both are healthy they should get out of there and go home asap!!
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  #834  
Old 05-10-2015, 03:18 AM
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The Birth of HRH Princess Charlotte of Cambridge: May 2, 2015

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Originally Posted by Iluvbertie View Post
I used the term 'nurse' because I was under the impression (based on my sister-in-law who is a nurse and a midwife and couldn't become a midwife until she had completed her general nursing course) that midwives were also nurses.

Not necessarily in the UK. Most are but it's possible to only train as a midwife. A nurse does not have the skills, training or qualifications to perform the role of a midwife.

I stopped referring to myself as a nurse (I am an RN and RM) once I got my midwifery qualification.

I'm not knocking nurses. They just have very different skills. I could not do the work that a specialist ER nurse or theatre nurse or paediatric nurse etc can do. I simply didn't have the skills or training. I did agency nursing in the year before I left the profession and I was completely out of my depth caring for sick people after spending 15 years working in midwifery.

Again, I think it's a nationality thing. One of the reasons I left midwifery once I came to Australia was that I found it so frustrating that I couldn't work the way I had been trained.


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  #835  
Old 05-10-2015, 04:39 AM
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Of course, I realize a lot of people (especially royals) are surrounded with help of various kinds once they get home, be it a nurse or family members.
I think they must have some kind of emergency equipment in the palaces for different cases, because some complications can't wait too long.
Absolutely normal births don't occur very often, so I understand why some mothers have to stay longer in hospital.
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  #836  
Old 05-10-2015, 05:15 AM
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Different health systems work differently. My guess is that women in the US stay longer in hospital post delivery because hospitals and doctors are trying to avoid litigation.

Things are different in South Africa. I work in the public sector and we do not have the beds & staff to keep a woman & baby in hospital if there were no complications during delivery. We observe them for 6 hours and they go home. They then have a 1 week follow up at their local clinic.

In the UK, I think that they stay longer in hospital and on discharge they are under the care of a community midwife who makes a home visit (someone from the UK can correct me on that)

So I wasnt shocked when Catherine left hospital the same day, especially since she has world class specialist at her beck & call.
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  #837  
Old 05-10-2015, 05:28 AM
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I remember when Diana left the hospital with William there were murmurs that she had left too soon. It was 21 hours after she gave birth. With Harry it was much the same.


Anne was only in hospital for two days with Peter in 1977 (the same hospital of course)
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  #838  
Old 05-10-2015, 06:49 AM
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Originally Posted by VictoriaB View Post
Not necessarily in the UK. Most are but it's possible to only train as a midwife. A nurse does not have the skills, training or qualifications to perform the role of a midwife.

I stopped referring to myself as a nurse (I am an RN and RM) once I got my midwifery qualification.

I'm not knocking nurses. They just have very different skills. I could not do the work that a specialist ER nurse or theatre nurse or paediatric nurse etc can do. I simply didn't have the skills or training. I did agency nursing in the year before I left the profession and I was completely out of my depth caring for sick people after spending 15 years working in midwifery.

Again, I think it's a nationality thing. One of the reasons I left midwifery once I came to Australia was that I found it so frustrating that I couldn't work the way I had been trained.


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I am just midwife trained - no nursing training at all. Most midwives get quite tetchy when people refer to them as nurses as we are not nurses.

It's really common for women who are extremely low risk and have had straight forward births to go home just over 6 hours later. The midwife visits the family at home the following day. In Kate's case it's probably even even better to be at home as I am sure she has all the help she needs to allow her to not have to move much from the sofa!
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  #839  
Old 05-10-2015, 08:42 AM
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As I explained I used the term 'nurse' because my sister-in-law is a nurse who had to be qualified as a nurse first before she was allowed to do the extra training required to be a mid-wife. As she is the only person I know who is a mid-wife it seems that I have erroneously assumed that the minimum requirement to be a mid-wife - that of being a registered nurse - has changed since she did her training in the late 1970s.


It seems either the standard has changed since the late 70s or is different in different countries.
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  #840  
Old 05-10-2015, 08:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Iluvbertie View Post
I remember when Diana left the hospital with William there were murmurs that she had left too soon. It was 21 hours after she gave birth. With Harry it was much the same.


Anne was only in hospital for two days with Peter in 1977 (the same hospital of course)
Fortunately, these days the new mom is consulted about how they feel and when they would like to go home. Insurance may put on upper limits, but asking the patient what they would like is appropriate. In Kate's case, insurance was not an issue. She left when she did because she wanted to and I find that wonderful. Happy US Mother's Day to all our Mom's!
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