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  #61  
Old 04-07-2005, 04:51 PM
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Originally Posted by shelley
Thank you Humera. You really are a whizz at unearthing pictures and information about Princess Sarvath. I had seen the middle picture before as it is on the cover of 'From Purdah to Parliament, 'but not the others. One point though, I had always thought that 'Begum' in its real sense was a title ( hence The Begum Aga Khan). This impression is confirmed by Chamber's Dictionary which says : Begum: A Muslim princess or a lady of rank, a deferential title given to a Muslim lady. I think like 'Madame' it has now in the modern world come to have a double meaning. For instance, the funeral service sheet of the late Grand Duchess Joesphine Charlotte read 'Madame La Grande Duchess Joesphine -Charlotte de Luxembourg'. I think after reading the autobiography, the Princess's mother was a Begum in the classic sense, more than just a 'Mrs'. :)
oh yes you're right. I only meant that in this case Begum means Mrs.
Actually it can serve both purposes, as Mrs. and a title of respect.
The Pakistani first lady, for example, is called Begum Sehba Musharraf.
Clearly she is not a Princess. And since royalty and ranks of nobility no longer exist in Pakistan, the word Begum usually implies Mrs.
In the Urdu language today, for example, we usually say things like "how is your Begum (wife)" or "this is my Begum (wife)" and so on...
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  #62  
Old 04-08-2005, 06:02 AM
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I think sadly Princess Sarvath's father died a very long time ago, but I have the following extract from my source, the website. I also think that Begum Ikramullah's dedication at the beginning of ' Purdah to Parliament ' is charming and tongue in cheek and says much about that couple's relationship : "To my husband, who took me out of purdah, and has regretted it ever since !" If that were really true, I do not think a) she would have said it and b) maybe achieved as much as she did professionally.

Mohammad Ikramullah, K.C.M.G., H.Pk., father of Princess Sarvath was a senior ICS officer in the Government of India before Partition and represented that country in many international fora, most particularly as Advisor to the preparatory commissions of the United Nations in London and San Francisco, and at its first general assembly, between 1945 and 1946.

Whilst a member of the provisional government of Pakistan, he was Secretary and Advisor at the Ministries of Commerce, Information and Broadcasting, Commonwealth Relations and Foreign Affairs. Appointed the first Foreign Secretary of the Government of Pakistan in 1947, he went on to serve as Ambassador to Canada, Portugal, France and Britain. He was instrumental in setting up the Commonwealth Economic Committee and had been nominated as Secretary-General of the Commonwealth at the time of his death. Princess Sarvath's paternal uncle, Mohammad Hidayatullah was Chief Justice, Vice-President of India and at one time Acting President. Other members of her immediate family have served their countries in Ambassadorial and Ministerial capacities, and many of them are distinguished academics and writers.

Her Royal Highness Princess Sarvath's paternal family are from Bhopal in Central India. Her grandfather, Khan Bahadur Hafiz Mohammed Wilayatullah's family served for several generations at the Court of Bhopal, one of the largest Muslim Princely States. The family is reputed to have come originally from the Hijaz and are regarded as both Quraishi and Chishti. There are documents held in the State Archives of India which trace the family's presence in India back to the time of the Emperor Auranzeb, and it is assumed that some earlier branches of the family came to India with the first Muslim conquerors. Many of the Princess' paternal ancestors were writers and poets. Unusually, Her Royal Highness' great grandmother was a published authoress and her grandfather a well known poet of his time throughout India.
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  #63  
Old 04-08-2005, 09:26 AM
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thanx for that info shelley. Princess Sarvath's family is indeed a distinguished and learned one. Im sure she has just as much to be proud of her lineage as a royal born princess.
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  #64  
Old 04-08-2005, 10:08 AM
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Look what I found,a link on that ever useful website ! And written by Princess
Sarvath herself. It is obviously written for a Pakistani/Indian readership because some of the refrences would only have relevance to them, but still it gives an interesting picture of a man who obviously played an important part in forming Princess Sarvath's character. ( Sorry ! I have absolutely no idea how to makes these pictures smaller. They are much smaller on the website. Please adminstrators, feel free to fiddle)



Outside 10 Downing Street
in 1956-57 around the time
of the Suez Canal/Baghdad
Pact crises



A Tribute to Abba



By HRH Princess Sarvath El Hassan
as appeared in the SHE Magazine February 2003 issue

January 15th marked 100 years since my father, Mohammed Ikramullah, was born, in Bhopal, in what were then known as the Central Provinces of India. To many of the younger generation in today's Pakistan, the values of my father, and many of his colleagues, may appear totally alien. Their contribution in those early, crucial years of Pakistan's existence, is no longer remembered in the way that is their due. Despite the unimaginable problems that they had to contend with, they persevered and to a large degree succeeded, in their task of nation building, (although the blueprint they used to create Pakistan appears to have been lost!) Abba represented all that was respected, admired and desirable in a public servant; even that phrase is now an anachronism. Strong, decisive and totally focused, he was incorruptible, morally and materially. Heading a group of officials who had been entrusted with the negotiations for some of our earliest arms purchases in Germany, he, like his colleagues, was presented with a Rolex watch. He returned it to his hosts with the remark "my people stand knee deep in water to earn our foreign exchange (in those days our main source of income were jute and rice exports grown in the then East Pakistan), I cannot accept this, please add whatever its value is to our purchases." His abashed colleagues followed his lead, and result we were given several thousands of dollars of extra purchases, for free, so impressed were the Germans with this show of selflessness. This pattern was to be repeated more than once in his career, as sadly, the taking of 'commissions' became increasingly the norm.

Academically gifted, my father read history at Trinity College, Cambridge, and decided to join the ICS (Indian Civil Service), not on quota, but through competition. The difference is significant. The British in the waning of the Empire, had decided to allow a certain number of Indians to join this prestigious service. However, these men would only be allowed to progress so far and no further. On the other hand, if an Indian was able to sit the qualifying examination in open competition with the British, and succeed on merit, then he could join the Service with all the rights and opportunities open to an Englishman. My father was amongst the few who succeeded. At the time of Partition, he was the senior Indian competition ICS officer in service in undivided India. Abba died before he could record his memoirs, but I have come to realise that this was a man who had a truly extraordinary wealth and breadth of experience, possibly unmatched at that time in the Indian Subcontinent. In the Government of India he was to serve as Joint Secretary in the Ministries of Trade & Labour; Supply; Commerce and Transport; as well as Trade Commissioner at the India Office in London. Advisor & Secretary to the ILO Conferences in Geneva in 1945 & 1946; and to the Preparatory Session of the United Nations in San Francisco in 1945, he was also a delegate to the First Session of the UN in London in 1946, amongst several posts and responsibilities. After Abba opted for Pakistan, despite the entreaties of many of his Indian colleagues and indeed family, he served with Mohammad Ali Jinnah on the Partition Committee of India. Having served simultaneously as Secretary of the Ministries of Commerce; Information & Broadcasting, Commonwealth Relations & Foreign Affairs in the Provisional Government of Pakistan, he was, after Partition, selected as Foreign Secretary by the Public Services' Commission and was Pakistan's first Foreign Secretary and Cabinet Secretary. He was proud to relate that he had started the Foreign Office sitting on packing cases and tea chests! Later, our envoy to Canada, France, the United Kingdom and Portugal, Abba returned for a second term as Foreign Secretary. Moving back to London, in semi-retirement, Abba started yet another career, as the Chairman of the Commonwealth Economic Committee (a post for which his nomination was unusually unanimously accepted by all the countries of the Commonwealth), he was a great believer in the institution of the Commonwealth, and its potential for good, unfashionable though it may seem these days. (But for his premature death, it had been the intention of Lord Home, the then British Foreign Secretary to nominate him as the Secretary General of the then half created Commonwealth Secretariat).

Mr. Ikramullah has been decorated with Hilal-e-Pakistan KCMG, Knight Commander of the Grand Cross, (A Portuguese order), CIE amongst others
Obviously, the sort of pace my father kept took a toll on his health, and perhaps the beginnings of a certain amount of disillusionment at the path that Pakistan, and indeed the world was taking, also played its part. After suffering a couple of heart attacks in those pre bypass days, he reluctantly agreed to go 'on leave preparatory to retirement'. He had seven years of leave with full pay due to him, that somehow the demands of his work had never allowed him to take! There were countless parties in his honour hosted by friends, colleagues and diplomats, but the by far the most moving tributes were made at a unique party that was hosted by the chaprassies, drivers and clerks of the Foreign Office. An incident told to me recently illustrates perfectly my father's humanity. Abba was walking one morning from our house in Clifton to Mohatta Palace, casually, as was his wont, with his jacket flung over his shoulder, and of course no one in attendance. He was accosted by an obviously desperate looking man, who wanted a petition written for him to present to someone of authority in the Foreign Office. Sensing his desperation, and not wanting to frighten him off, my father sat down at the roadside, and quietly hearing his story composed a lucid letter for him, with a look silencing the scandalised crowd who had gathered, wondering who was this impudent man who was troubling the Foreign Secretary. Abba then helped the poor man on to his feet, on whom realisation had dawned, and taking him into Mohatta Palace, led him to the appropriate person to get his petition dealt with. This is only one of so many stories of this kind that I am still told nearly 40 years after Abba's death. Many hundreds who were totally unknown to us followed my father's cortege; obviously people whose life he had touched in a similar manner.

Despite being equally well read in both Urdu and English, with a fair knowledge of Persian, (Abba could quote with equal facility from say, Ghalib or Dickens) my father was no intellectual snob. He loved westerns films, cartoons, and comic books. In hospital, after his first heart attack, staid visitors were slightly bemused to find the extremely distinguished, silver haired Mr. Ikramullah chuckling his way through the antics of Little Lulu and Tubby! My father was also an excellent sportsman and was known to play an excellent game of tennis and hockey. A superb and courageous shot, he always stalked his prey on foot rather than wait in the safety of a 'machan'. In his early days as an ICS officer, he became well known as he rode around on his black stallion Beaunerges (named after Napoleon's war horse), followed by his massive, but harmless English mastiffs.

My parents in Canada, Banff in 1953
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  #65  
Old 04-08-2005, 10:09 AM
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My father was inordinately proud of the achievements of his wife, children and siblings. My parents had a totally arranged marriage, and did not set eyes upon each other until their Rumnamaee. Marriage certainly was not a priority in my mother's life when the wedding arrangements were being made. She was due to take her B.A. Degree from Calcutta University that spring, and had her mother's increasingly poor health not made the marriage of her only living child a must, Amma had planned to continue her studies at Oxford that autumn. The ceremonies were first planned for the previous December, which my mother, to her horror, found clashed with her final examinations. In the traditional atmosphere in which my Naniamma lived, it would have been totally unseemly for Amma to voice an opinion as to when her actual marriage should take place, she had only one recourse, which was to get an obliging cousin to intercede with her father. Luckily my Nana was in any case loathe to part with his beloved daughter (she is my only daughter he would say to my father in later years, wanting my mother to prolong a visit to her mayka; the reply would be, 'well… she is my only wife!') When the problem was relayed to my father, he instantly agreed for the wedding to be postponed until April. This set the tone for the partnership that was to characterise my parents' marriage. In her autobiography, 'Purdah to Parliament' the dedication, 'To my husband, who took me out of Purdah, and regretted it ever since!' was the result of a flippant remark made by my mother but she was reluctant to use this, as she felt it was unfair to Abba, however both he and the publisher's assistant wanted it used. Her political career could have had serious repercussions on his own, but he was entirely supportive and proud of her. As he was of his children. He would have been so proud that all his seven grandchildren, Mashallah, girls and boys, are graduates. When my elder sister Salma got her degree from Cambridge, there was almost no containing his pride. My sister Naz was due to hold her first solo exhibition of paintings in London the week Abba died. My mother insisted that Apa stay in London and go ahead with the exhibition, rather than return to Pakistan for his funeral, as she knew that would have been what Abba wanted.

My father was a conventionally religious man, who knew and understood his religion properly. Typical of his era and his upbringing, my Dada was a Hafiz Al Quran (as well as being a gold medallist from Aligarh University in English Literature, a published poet in Urdu & Persian, a good shot and a keen tennis player!) Abba was fairly orthodox in his personal views, but with no hint of bigotry. His friends and associates encompassed all religions and many nationalities. He had respect and tolerance of the views of others, and demanded the same courtesy for himself. We were brought up not to personalise political or religious differences. My parents were surrogate siblings, parents, aunt and uncle, marriage councillors, educational advisors and father confessors to so many. Abba had time for the constant stream of people passing through our home and for us too. And both our parents had an amazing knack of making us all feel special… in fact, a few years after Abba died, we discovered to our combined surprise and amusement, that each one of us had felt rather sorry for our other siblings for not quite achieving the favourite child status, a true life example of the answer of Hazrat Ali who when asked who is your favourite child replied "the youngest till he is grown, the one who is ill until he is well, and the one who is away from home until he returns…"


In his later years, Abba took up photography, both stills and movies, specialising in flowers, animals, and us. Abba loved animals and had kept dogs before he was married, but we as a family switched to cats. Although he wrote away a small fortune in property when we came to Pakistan, he gave into my sisters' pleadings and our cat Coco came with us from Delhi in 1947, as did my cat Mink on our return from London in 1959. My father was an excellent gardener who took pleasure in growing what for those times were rare vegetables in the foreign countries we lived in: aubergines, okra, whatever. He delighted in sending photographs to my Phupee, with whom he had a life long competition to see who produced the bigger and better produce. In the last years in London, he further developed another skill: cooking. Always having been both a gourmet and gourmand all his life, he shared his love of good and unusual cuisines with us, "Chuk kar toe daykho" he would say to us, when faced with an unfamiliar dish. He had always enjoyed cooking the odd dish from his days at university. Now with more time to spare, he would make brunch for us at weekends and became wonderfully inventive. Amma not knowing much about the practicalities of housekeeping when they were first married, Abba had taught her how to recognise the various dals. Years earlier, when Amma was at the U.N it was reported 'Ikramullah can cook'. Hearing of this, a particular gentleman asked rather condescendingly, 'We hear you can cook, Ikramullah Sahib. So what is your speciality?' "An excellent Haleem, of goat's meat" replied my father, quick as a flash to the person in question, one Abu Bakr Haleem…


Abba was gentle, tolerant and witty, with the marvellous ability of being able to laugh at himself. When leaving London to return home, after a very successful term as High Commissioner, Mrs Lakshmi Pandit, as the Dean of the Commonwealth Corps. gave a party for my parents at which she paid generous, fulsome tributes. Abba replied saying, " …I have spent the last the five years asking you to disregard everything Mrs Pandit says. May I ask you one last time, to do so again!"
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  #66  
Old 04-08-2005, 11:49 AM
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wow shelley! thats a lot of info. I will certainly take time to read this. Where did you get it from?
The intro mentions that the article appeared in the February 2003 issue of SHE magazine. Thats a Pakistani fashion/entertainment/lifestyle magazine.
I'll certainly check out the SHE website and see if they have the issue in their archives.

btw..its so cute that Princess Sarvath calls her dad "abba"
Thats what my mom called her dad. "abba/abbu" are common titles of address for fathers in Pakistan.
And she calls her mom "amma." Thats what my dad calls his mom!
Though "ammi" is the more common title of address in Pakistan now.
The two terms were certainly more widely used before and after the partition of India and Pakistan.

btw..I thought I should translate/clarify some of the terms used in the article shelley posted in case some of you aren't familiar with them

Abba-father
Amma-mother
Naniamma-maternal grandmother ('nani')
Nana-maternal grandfather
Mayka-term used to refer to a married woman's birth/parents' family
Apa-older sister
Dada-paternal grandfather
Hafiz Al Quran-someone who has memorized the Quran by heart
Phupee-aunt (father's sister-also called "Phupo")
"Chuk kar toe daykho" -in Urdu, "try and taste it"

btw..it was nice to read familiar references in the article. The Princess mentions that her parents had a house in Clifton. I wonder if they still do? I'll have to check up on that. Clifton is a posh area in Karachi, Pakistan, at least it is now. We used to live there too. And Mohatta Place is familiar too. It is a beautiful, historic building from colonial times. I drove by and visited it so many times when I was living in Karachi. It is now used for special events like exhibition openings, fashion shows, etc.
Great find shelley!
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Old 04-08-2005, 12:45 PM
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Wow..Princess Sarvath comes from a real noble family. Good job Shelley.
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Old 04-08-2005, 05:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shelley
'From Purdah to Parliament'
I've read this autobiography by Begum Ikramullah and, although it focuses primarily on her own background and professional life, it gives some wonderful insights into the environment in which P. Sarvath was raised. This was a family that, although could've just rested back on their laurels, clearly valued education, personal achievement, and public service, and I think a person raised in such a way would quite naturally grow to become someone who cultivated her own mind, set her sights high in attaining her own accomplishments, and sought to improve the lot of people less fortunate than her. Indeed, this seems to be how P. Sarvath turned out, and it might explain not only why she didn't invest much time chasing the limelight, but also why less accomplished family members might resent her for the high standards she has set for herself.

Quote:
Originally Posted by shelley
I think sadly Princess Sarvath's father died a very long time ago.
By my math, she was only about 16 when he passed. :( That is just a little older than P. Raiyah was when KH died. I wonder whether the two have ever talked about this, whether P. Raiyah has ever sought her auntie's counsel on coping at such a young age with that kind of adversity.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ~*~Humera~*~
Im sure she has just as much to be proud of her lineage as a royal born princess.
I think perhaps even more, since her family's standing and status are more a result of hard work and achievement than birthright. I think, in some ways, marrying into the JRF might've even been a step down for P. Sarvath. She has given up a lot to become a part of that family, in my opinion.

Quote:
Originally Posted by monamona
Wow..Princess Sarvath comes from a real noble family. Good job Shelley.
I'm glad others are beginning to see why I am such an admirer of P. Hassan and P. Sarvath. It isn't just blind adoration, but admiration based on how these two have lived their lives, how they have raised their children, and how they have managed to hang onto their decency, dignity, and souls, despite having had every opportunity to sit back and capitalize on their positions in life. They have been graceful even in the face of adversities and indignities. There is much to admire and a lesson for us all in that.
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  #69  
Old 04-08-2005, 08:45 PM
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Originally Posted by papillon
I think perhaps even more, since her family's standing and status are more a result of hard work and achievement than birthright. I think, in some ways, marrying into the JRF might've even been a step down for P. Sarvath. She has given up a lot to become a part of that family, in my opinion.
yes that was my meaning.
In fact my respect for her doesnt come because she's a member of the JRF, its because of the family she comes from. It would be natural for any Pakistani to admire the pioneers in the nation's history. Though, like PS said in the article shelley posted, her parent's name aren't the first ones to be mentioned when people talk of important figures in Pakistani history. Her mother is certainly the more prominent figure. And PS continues to spread her parents' message and that of Jinnah everytime she comes to Pakistan and gives speeches, interviews etc. Which is why I think you might be right about her marrying into the JRF. Though Prince Hassan is a fitting husband, I still think she might've had more of an impact in Pakistan. She'd certainly be treated with more respect than she seems to command at present in the JRF and the jordanian media.
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Old 04-08-2005, 09:10 PM
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Originally Posted by ~*~Humera~*~
In fact my respect for her doesnt come because she's a member of the JRF, its because of the family she comes from.
Mine doesn't come from that, either. . .for either of them. I just admire them for who they are as people. It's a matter of their characters and their humanity to me.

Quote:
Her mother is certainly the more prominent figure.
Maybe it's a matter of her mother having had a longer life in which to perform her public service and to make her mark.

Quote:
Which is why I think you might be right about her marrying into the JRF. Though Prince Hassan is a fitting husband, I still think she might've had more of an impact in Pakistan. She'd certainly be treated with more respect than she seems to command at present in the JRF and the jordanian media.
They appear to be happily married, so I'm not at all second guessing that. But, unlike many women who marry into royal families, P. Sarvath already had her own thing going, it was a good one, and she would've probably made her mark regardless of whether she married P. Hassan. In many ways, being a royal is a more confining life and, in that sense, I think she probably gave up much of her autonomy and freedom.

I think she would've been able to make a huge positive effect on Pakistan had she taken that route, and she would have had a running start because of who her parents are and the respect they garner. In Jordan, it seems she not only didn't have a running start, some social forces actually work against her. And that is just another sad aspect of whatever racial/social discrimination she's suffered there. The damage isn't limited to whatever impact it's had on her as a person, there's also the missed opportunity for Jordanians to widen the aperture on their world view and to benefit fully from the talents of such an amazing woman. It's not as though Jordan is an otherwise thriving nation. . .talents like hers are absolutely needed and valuable. So the discrimination really, really bothers me. :(
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Old 04-08-2005, 10:32 PM
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Originally Posted by papillon
I think she would've been able to make a huge positive effect on Pakistan had she taken that route, and she would have had a running start because of who her parents are and the respect they garner. In Jordan, it seems she not only didn't have a running start, some social forces actually work against her. And that is just another sad aspect of whatever racial/social discrimination she's suffered there. The damage isn't limited to whatever impact it's had on her as a person, there's also the missed opportunity for Jordanians to widen the aperture on their world view and to benefit fully from the talents of such an amazing woman. It's not as though Jordan is an otherwise thriving nation. . .talents like hers are absolutely needed and valuable. So the discrimination really, really bothers me. :(
Her mother living longer is a good point ofcourse, it didnt occur to me.
Princess Sarvath certainly would've had more of an impact in Pak. yes. Even now, though she's very rarely mentioned in the Pakistani media and many people aren't familiar with her, everytime she is here, you can always catch an article or two about it in the the press, whether she's making a speech or asking Pakistani fashion designers to do shows for her in Jordan.
She patronizes the human development department as well, among others.
So clearly, being married to the a Jordanian Prince hasnt stopped her from making an impact in her land of origin.
As for the discrimination, I dont want to get too much into it like the Princess Haya debate and the common wariness some Arabs feel about "foreigners," I dont want to make it sound like all Arabs have this problem, but it is very sad. And more so because in South Asia, a lot of our politicians and heads of state are married to foreign-born spouses, many of them from the ME but their nationalities aren't debated and they're not resented as "outsiders." Infact former PM Benazir Bhutto's mom is Iranian born and of Kurdish origin.
Who knows, if PS had stayed in Pak. she might've been the PM of the country, certainly someone with clout. Its not as far-fetched as it sounds. Given the fact that her parents were such notable figures, and in Pakistani politics we certainly have what you might called political dynasties. Benazir Bhutto, the former PM, for example, followed in the footsteps of her grandfather Sir Shahnawaz Bhutto, who was a Muslim League leader, before the partition of the subcontinent (like PS's parents who were involved in the independence movement), her father Zulfiqar who was also a former PM. And now it seems that her kids will be involved in Pakistani politics as well.
So its is quite common for men and women of Princess Sarvath's background to be major players in Pakistani politics.
Spilt milk I know, but still, something to think about.

Look what I found on the SHE magazine website.
Their archives didnt go as far back as 2003 but I did find this little mention of a fashion show arranged for charity by Princess Sarvath.
btw..Tapu Javeri seems to be one of her favourite photographers. I have a beautiful portrait he took of PS a few years back. I posted it in one of the older threads. PS also appears to be a regular client (among other ME royal ladies) of designer Maheen Khan (the grey-haired lady in the second pic).
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Old 04-08-2005, 11:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reina
I wonder what Arabs think of Turks. I already know what Turks think of Arabs ,so I don't think some Arabs should gloat that much about the superiority of their race.

Anyway maybe she would have been a politician or first lady of Pakistan. I kind of don't think she would be the kind to run for Prime Minister. However I do think she would have done quite a service to PAkistan.
Yes she would. If not as a political figure then perhaps as a contributor to the literary/art community like some of her family members. Though Im not sure if she's inclined that way.
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Old 04-09-2005, 12:06 AM
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Originally Posted by ~*~Humera~*~
So clearly, being married to the a Jordanian Prince hasnt stopped her from making an impact in her land of origin.
No, I didn't mean to imply that she has. But because she lives in Jordan and also has responsibilities there, now her time and efforts are more divided. In fact, she is quite loyal and true to her roots.

Quote:
Spilt milk I know, but still, something to think about.
Well, there's quite a pool of spilled milk to cry over in that family. I feel both P. Sarvath's and P. Hassan's gifts and talents are underutilized and underappreciated. :(

Quote:
Originally Posted by ~*~Humera~*~
Look what I found on the SHE magazine website.
Their archives didnt go as far back as 2003 but I did find this little mention of a fashion show arranged for charity by Princess Sarvath.
Are these photos from late 2004? I was working in Jordan last fall, and I think I remember hearing about an upcoming fundraiser along these lines.
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Old 04-09-2005, 12:15 AM
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Originally Posted by papillon
Are these photos from late 2004? I was working in Jordan last fall, and I think I remember hearing about an upcoming fundraiser along these lines.
No these pics are from the February 2004 issue of SHE mag.
Though I did hear about a bunch of people from the Pakistani fashion industry being invited for another fashion show by PS in late 2004. That sort of thing is quite frequent. Which is why I mentioned once that its more common for me to come across Princess Sarvath's name in the fashion pages of the Pakistani press than in the Jordanian media.
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Old 04-09-2005, 12:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ~*~Humera~*~
No these pics are from the February 2004 issue of SHE mag.
Though I did hear about a bunch of people from the Pakistani fashion industry being invited for another fashion show by PS in late 2004. That sort of thing is quite frequent. Which is why I mentioned once that its more common for me to come across Princess Sarvath's name in the fashion pages of the Pakistani press than in the Jordanian media.
Thanks for clarifying.

Well, it is quite rare for the Jordanian press to give her any coverage, which is a shame because she has done a lot of good there.
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Old 04-10-2005, 06:35 PM
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El Hassan Bin Talal Award winners honoured

By Mohammad Ghazal

Their Royal Highnesses Prince Hassan and Princess Sarvath present the first prize of the El Hassan Bin Talal Award for Academic Excellence to Director of the Centre for Excellence in Education Fathi Jarwan at the Royal Cultural Centre on Sunday (Petra photo)AMMAN — The Jubilee School received the first prize of the El Hassan Bin Talal Award for Academic Excellence for its “King Hussein Science Garden” project during a ceremony yesterday.

Fathi Jarwan director of the Centre for Excellence in Education, received the JD5,000 prize on behalf of the school for its entry, an interactive approach that complements the different fields of sciences, frees the students and teachers from the limitations of the classroom and closed laboratories, and presents scientific concepts and laws in a fun-filled environment that encourages inquisitiveness and exploration.

The second place prize of JD3,000, was shared between Al Jubeiha High School for Girls and Al Dur Al Manthour School.

The winning entry from Al Jubeiha High School for Girls, “At Risk Children — Children between Dropout and Beggars,” a field research that examines the reasons behind the issue of school dropouts and ways to remedy the problem.

The students conducting the project also established a charitable fund for underprivileged students to help them stay in school.

Principal Maryam Lawzi was presented with the award.

Al Dur Al Manthour School's entry, which tied for second place, comprises several curricular and extracurricular educational programmes. Called “The School That We Want,” the project sought to achieve the Kingdom's vision for quality education in schools. Principal Alesar Obeid received the award.

The JD2,000 third place prize was split between the Islamic Scientific College for its project, “Students' Curriculum for Success and Excellence,” and the Baqaa High School for Girls project, “Book Binding and School Garden.” Principals Mohammad Idris of the Islamic Scientific College and Intesar Khlail of the Baqaa High School received the prizes.

Addressing the audience at the Royal Cultural Centre in the presence of HRH Princess Sarvath, HRH Prince Hassan, Chairman of the Higher Council for Science and Technology (HCST), said, “Creativity can be individual or institutional, but in the case of this award it's both.”

He went on to underscore the importance of training and qualifying teachers to improve education in Jordan.

The committee of judges for the award reviewed 20 projects submitted by 16 institutions.

The award, created in 1995 to encourage academic, scientific and technological activities, is granted annually to winners in one of three categories: Institutions of general education, institutions of higher education, and institutions of vocational and technical education.

Monday, April 11, 2005




link:
http://www.jordantimes.com/mon/homenews/homenews8.htm
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  #77  
Old 04-11-2005, 02:39 AM
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"It's strange to me that P. Sarvath isn't mentioned in Petra's caption, even though she is just as visible in this photograph as P. Hassan. Anyway, it is always nice to see them out and about."

She doesn't look her best so may she won't mind not being identified ! :p Either the lightening was wrong or she had a fright in the night.
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Old 04-11-2005, 12:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shelley
She doesn't look her best so may she won't mind not being identified ! :p Either the lightening was wrong or she had a fright in the night.
Then maybe she used her clout with the local press to have her name suppressed from the caption. Actually, I think she looks just fine. The lighting is not optimal, but that is not her fault. And those photographers just randomly snap away at events like that. . .it's difficult for anyone to look her best in every frame.
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Old 04-11-2005, 05:32 PM
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Prince Hassan Patronizes Opening of Plastic Art Gallery in Berlin

Berlin, April 11 (Petra)-- His Royal Highness Prince Hassan Ben Talal on Monday patronized the opening of the Gallery of Jordanian Plastic Artist Rasem Badran.
In the presence of the German Minister of State for Foreign Affairs, Jordan Ambassador to Germany Dr. Saleh Irshidat, and a number of Arab and foreign Ambassadors, the gallery, which included wonderful works of art, got the appreciation of all attendants.
The Embassy of Jordan in Berlin held a reception on this occasion in cooperation with the German Foreign Ministry.

link:
http://207.228.233.96/nepras/2005/Apr/11/24800900.htm
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Old 04-18-2005, 08:08 PM
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Source of article

Prince Hassan Addresses Parliament of Cultures
4/18/05

AMMAN (JT) — HRH Prince Hassan returned home on Sunday after attending the second session of the Assembly of the Parliament of Culture in Ankara.

The founders, Professor Ihsan Dogramaci and Prince Hassan, joined members from Venezuela, Malaysia, Germany, Turkey, Israel, Georgia, Australia and America at Bilkent University.

In his address to the assembly, the Prince said the Parliament of Cultures was a living testament both to the heterodox history of the Mediterranean region and to our common heritage.

He emphasised that the assembly, was not working against, but for a shared vision, a culture of compliance, a code of conduct, citizens' conferencing and a new international humanitarian order.

The Prince said that the central role of culture in human interaction in the 21st century could not be underestimated. He added that the forces that threaten the breakdown of order stem from a crisis in identity — a cultural crisis. "That is why it is so important that this Parliament fulfils its potential, conceiving of shared solutions across cultures and leading the way from the ubiquitous culture of war towards a culture of peace."

During his visit to Ankara Prince Hassan also attended a conference organised by the Academie de la Latinite on the theme, "Islam, Latinity, Transmodernity."

In his address, the Prince said the trans-modern world which we are seeking, is one in which we engage as equal partners in the process of cultural assimilation and in which our differences only lead us towards our common humanity.

Prince Hassan emphasised that here that he was talking about culture, not about "first world" or "third world": "I am talking about market forces being balanced by the need for ethical integrity. We should undertake this not just out of enlightened self-interest, but as moral agents for a cause that is worthy in itself," he said.
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