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  #301  
Old 07-31-2017, 08:01 PM
Muhler's Avatar
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Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Eastern Jutland, Denmark
Posts: 9,999
Now let's have a closer look at a pre-renaissance castle.

Spøttrup Castle: https://app.box.com/s/okbac09brsyher8n5vtgrlm5up93qjt2

Castles around the Baltic Sea, and as such in Scandinavia, are totally different from castles in Britain, France, most of German, let alone Italy and Spain-Portugal. They are typically much more compact and if they have curtain walls, it's typically more to slow down an enemy or to mark a boundary, rather than as a serious part of the defense. And they are roofed. So you won't see walls and towers with crenelations on top in this part of Europe.
Instead you will see massive buildings and just under the roof of these buildings would be a "vægtergang" = a corridor for sentries. Here the sentries could patrol and observe unseen, in dry weather, and be far less exposed to the cold.
The massive buildings surrounded a fairly small courtyard, because the main functions of the castles (and especially the similar fortified manors) was not to provide shelter for the locals and have cattle and horses and refugees in the courtyard. They were there to react quickly, almost instantly to threats, be they in the form of a raid or more likely a local uprising. - Peasants in Denmark rebelled literally at the drop of a hat! Mostly against a local noble, hence the compact fortified manors. So the castles should be able to defend themselves with very short notice, often only a couple of hours, with a very limited garrison and to hold out for at most a couple of weeks, until the king send someone to defuse the situation or sailed in a relief force.
Armies in Denmark until well into the 13-1400's did not march, they sailed. That also included raiding forces, which were a genuine menace until around 1300. Raiding forces were usually devoid of heavy siege equipment and also lacked the time to carry through a siege, before an army could be raised to counter them.
That meant that the countless peasant rebellions in DK during the middle ages were relatively bloodless. The raids could be very bloody, but the locals simply had to seek refuge in the local church and hold out as best they could, until the raiders withdrew. Only a few making it inside a castle or fortified manor in time.
In Britain, France, Spain and so on, the castles had elaborate defenses, partly to house enough living food in shape of cattle and pigs, to house refugees and to house horses for counter attacks later on. Also because sieges here could last months, sometimes even years.
That was not the case in Denmark. An invading army laying siege to a castle would within a month or so be cut off by the king's forces sailing in and forced to withdraw. Or if it was the king's forces laying siege to a castle, it was game-out for the garrison. There would be no relief, so they would soon give up.
- All this to give a background idea of why Danish castles look nothing like "movie-castles".
A castle like Spøttrup wouldn't make it as a setting in Game of Thrones, it doesn't look impressive enough. It's simply too practical.

Back to Spøttrup.
Spøttrup started out as a farm, first mentioned in 1404, in the possession of a noble, Johan Skarpenberg. He bequeted the farm to the bishop in the nearby town of Viborg, in return for being buried inside the cathedral there. The bishop made the farm the local administrative center for the church and it was a very affluent area, so there were many valuables gathered here. So by the late 1400's it was decided to build a castle here to protect these assets, and provide a refuge for the bishop. Peasants rebelled regularly against the local bishops as well! By no later than the 1520's it was finished. - A hyper-modern castle!
Just in time for the most vicious civil war in Danish history, known as the Feud of the Count, it was a war about who was to be king of Denmark, but also a peasant rebellion against the feudal society being introduced in Denmark at the time, inspired by similar rebellions, not least the Hussites, in Central Europe. At the same time the Reformation came sweeping in, so all in all, it was a very good idea the Viborg Bishop had, building a strong castle!
The castle was indeed attacked and a part of it damaged but it held out.
After the war, the Reformation was a reality. The feudal society also, the free peasants were disarmed and the king took over control of the defense of the realm, supported by locally raised regiments led and paid for by noble families. The church was eventually evicted from Spøttrup and the crown took over.
Now that there was peace, the castle went into disrepair.
It was turned over to the Below family, who modernized the place a bit. I.e. having more home-friendly windows rather than small ports to fire crossbows and canons from. Two tower-stairs were build as well, making it more easy to get from floor to floor. That had previously been made deliberately difficult this being a castle.
Time passed. The centuries went by. The castle changed hands many times.
By the early 1900's it was realized that we had a pretty unique real life water-castle, almost in original state on our hands here in DK! The state took over and it's now a museum and a magnet for medieval reenactors.

- That was the background. Short and sweet, eh?
In the next post we shall look at the castle itself in details.
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  #302  
Old 07-31-2017, 09:21 PM
Muhler's Avatar
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Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Eastern Jutland, Denmark
Posts: 9,999
Spøttrup Castle, part two.

Let's see things a bit from above: https://app.box.com/s/hdxpllxeewf24i8fqxxob3uufcxha56z

And closer, still from the air: https://app.box.com/s/i41hcebt32tek8zgaob7otmommy5rhr8

I can almost hear you think: What on earth is that?!? The castle is half-buried and it's not even located on a hill or something!
No, it's surrounded by a double-moat. Between the moats is a nine meter high earth rampart. Which originally had a palisade on top with a few minor redoubts for artillery.
https://app.box.com/s/8ww6xub5tuq1ia3ffs59wc282etw9jf6

By the time the castle was build, siege artillery had been developed and remember Constantinople had fallen just 50 years before! So artillery was something to take seriously!

In fact this is what you can see of the castle over the rampart. Less than that actually because of the palisade: https://app.box.com/s/9wpmaaqs2jmg4086fi9xyadg980zy4ql
That meant that since howitzers had not yet been developed, the foundations of the buildings was protected against direct artillery fire. And mortars could also only inflict limited damage as well. That meant that the roofs and upper floors were exposed but the castle base was still safe and able to defend the castle.
An enemy making across the first moat, would come under murderous fire from the palisade at the rampart and upper floors. And if the enemy made it to the rampart they would be exposed to even more damaging fire from the castle itself. And it would be almost impossible to drag heavy enough artillery onto the rampart to fire directly at the base of the castle. And should it be possible, crossbowmen would pick off the artillerymen on the rampart almost at leisure.

Let's approach the castle. First through the gate in the rampart: https://app.box.com/s/0rud7xtvuppjyak2scwr80f88859c9to

Then you come to the castle. Good luck making it across the moat, because there would be no bridge. https://app.box.com/s/s180pw6u179v0blsktpx3s731ijhn8ky
https://app.box.com/s/mxu6alv5dri7qg42b9x3zeiuzhep9q67
https://app.box.com/s/38uqv6xw2itgdg9sr7ljfvobvg4nyhhk
https://app.box.com/s/1rhgz5kfpcnghr72kt4qmaaqxmm5u3lq

The gate would be the most strongly defended part of the castle, subjecting an attacker to crossbow fire, as well as fire from light canons and later archebuses. - Fuse-muskets.
https://app.box.com/s/0ux02q0wdyy83wt4nljfkyv3r3f5uvni

Attack from the rear, then! Yeah, but attack what?
https://app.box.com/s/7oooujrxqdbsx4qvxk8bgpcziyqaqr7h

Spøttrup was a fully modern building with excellent toilet facilities. Here is the, ahem, exit from one of the toilets. There are as you may have noticed several: https://app.box.com/s/sttwt7yza8pz9qofmw77peegn1fvo33i
Ha! You think. I've seen Jean Claude van Dumb climb up such a toilet entrance in a film. - Yeah, if he could get past the iron bars up the exit...
It happened an attacker got stuck and eventually died in such exits. Not that it prevented the inhabitants of the castle from still using the toilet...
The Teutonic castles which are pretty similar to Spøttrup, had toilet-towers. Build out in the moat, and connected to castle via passage ways. That lessened the stench. But no such tower at Spøttrup.

But lets go through the gate and into the courtyard.
here you can better see the sentry-corridors beside the gate-tower: https://app.box.com/s/4368gpyoy07tbmpkbapj033e093pyvxm
The view from the sentry corridors is pretty good. Offering excellent firing positions for crossbow men: https://app.box.com/s/riqo1yrvs45dmmtbld0bl4x6qstqzn2n
Bows were no longer used in war around the Baltic Sea. Crossbows was the standard weapon now and very, very efficient!
Bows only served a use in the open field during raids, and due to the rate of fire rather than for range and penetration.

The two stair towers are a later addition, but still efficient for protection as you'll have to fight your way up the winding stairs.
https://app.box.com/s/rto1u8ssptwrom6arx0zfj4n1c5dpmwd
https://app.box.com/s/9gjgqrvek1og2n4qdrkj0qebuuln75oj

Let's go inside. Plenty of room. Notice the light artillery pieces. They were state of the art by the late 1400's. And well suited for the defense of such a castle: https://app.box.com/s/ranqu1jxk4odbixt68baoas6cs6mlvt0

This corner of the castle originally had a low building, but that is now gone: https://app.box.com/s/6er4vdqscu0fny0gpou789zefublhbe7
But often this would be an exit for fishing in the moat. There would deliberately be fish in the moat for additional food. Or alternatively to dump bodies.

But who lived, fought at and visited such a castle? Loads of reenactors descend on the castle every year, in more or less correct attire.
Here we have a monk, being called into the HR department I presume...
https://app.box.com/s/2efzrvu8qa5bhvgc3a9w90z4f6ysjfqa
The men at arms are from the 1200's. The halberds are a bit anachronistic. But the halberd on the left is a typical heavy combat-halberds. The great helmets were the latest military equipment in the early 1200's.

Here we see a pretty affluent man walking by some multi-gender monks, anno 1400 or so: https://app.box.com/s/nf14vi79jeejcznrngx7muan1g67tdlr

Here we see a merry group of maidens run out from the castle on a summers day in 1300'something. https://app.box.com/s/9wkmur6g3ovvww9cs4pd7hx0oz5l4w8m All of them, except the lady in the middle are unmarried. Otherwise they would wear a head scarve as a mark of their status. Being bare-foot was practical if the weather was good. Why wear out perfectly good shoes? They are lightly attired. People back then washed their undergarments regularly, but outer garments, like a dress or a coat would rarely, if ever, be washed in order to preserve the colors and sometimes also to keep the clothes reasonably water-proof.

Boys trying to shoot with bow and arrow. In this part of Europe, bows were for hunting and sport, not war.
https://app.box.com/s/4fm3pxm84mrhpxedgae61bo9x9sqvjls
The famed English (Welsh) longbow, took years to master and you had to be pretty strong in order to fire one. A crossbow could be fired by pretty much everyone, including women, and required only a minimum of training to fire. That the range and rate of fire was less than the longbow was considered of minor importance around the Baltic Sea.
Poachers and hunters and rebellious peasants were fond of the bow though: https://app.box.com/s/bf2bokzd6r9dl7c38rtz8brs9min7nd3
But very few mastered anything resembling a longbow.

Two unmarried and one married women having a frank exchange of opinions: https://app.box.com/s/gmw5ircx2vas8ktkbnyykj1wz9bl1hql
These are, perhaps with the exception of the woman in yellow, free women. I.e. not serfs. That is their families owned their own land.
Bare underarms were by this time still considered sexy!
People in the middle age, absolutely loved colors! The more garish the better! They would, if at all possible, wear colorful clothes.

But this time bishops no longer went to war in person. Well, they were really not supposed to go to war. And if they did, they should preferably not spill blood. So in comes the war-club, later developing into the maze seen here: https://app.box.com/s/zod21eants6umfksja26h1nn1ct0v0o1
A very excellent weapon. That would break an arm, smash a rib or two or at least dent the armor so much that it was extremely uncomfortable to wear.

By the time it was decided to build Spøttrup full-suited combat armor had almost reached the height of its developments, as seen from these two men-at-arms fighting here. Notice the parrying shield used by the man on the right: https://app.box.com/s/0g4ohruweipif5qnqjlz4y1b9pvlg143

Men-at-arms from around 1400. By now heavy armor-piecing weapons was the norm and the large shields had almost been abandoned: https://app.box.com/s/67keh5czeftx3398qk1fbsxxbsau7izi

Two what we today would label upper-middle class married women, anno 1400-something. They are both mistresses of their households, which can be seen from the keys they are wearing from their belts as a symbol of their status: https://app.box.com/s/7f6fwdqxmzk7roiglurvki3x6p9bu8uz

Let's end this with two last views of Spøttrup castle: https://app.box.com/s/71jwd9zvctf01diu3y7mw9myqxm2la60
https://app.box.com/s/1omjerxotx3z4h4ge7aldl439ojmkvnw
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  #303  
Old 07-31-2017, 11:14 PM
Courtier
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 748
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muhler View Post
Spøttrup Castle, part two.

Let's see things a bit from above: https://app.box.com/s/hdxpllxeewf24i8fqxxob3uufcxha56z

And closer, still from the air: https://app.box.com/s/i41hcebt32tek8zgaob7otmommy5rhr8

I can almost hear you think: What on earth is that?!? The castle is half-buried and it's not even located on a hill or something!
No, it's surrounded by a double-moat. Between the moats is a nine meter high earth rampart. Which originally had a palisade on top with a few minor redoubts for artillery.
https://app.box.com/s/8ww6xub5tuq1ia3ffs59wc282etw9jf6

By the time the castle was build, siege artillery had been developed and remember Constantinople had fallen just 50 years before! So artillery was something to take seriously!

In fact this is what you can see of the castle over the rampart. Less than that actually because of the palisade: https://app.box.com/s/9wpmaaqs2jmg4086fi9xyadg980zy4ql
That meant that since howitzers had not yet been developed, the foundations of the buildings was protected against direct artillery fire. And mortars could also only inflict limited damage as well. That meant that the roofs and upper floors were exposed but the castle base was still safe and able to defend the castle.
An enemy making across the first moat, would come under murderous fire from the palisade at the rampart and upper floors. And if the enemy made it to the rampart they would be exposed to even more damaging fire from the castle itself. And it would be almost impossible to drag heavy enough artillery onto the rampart to fire directly at the base of the castle. And should it be possible, crossbowmen would pick off the artillerymen on the rampart almost at leisure.

Let's approach the castle. First through the gate in the rampart: https://app.box.com/s/0rud7xtvuppjyak2scwr80f88859c9to

Then you come to the castle. Good luck making it across the moat, because there would be no bridge. https://app.box.com/s/s180pw6u179v0blsktpx3s731ijhn8ky
https://app.box.com/s/mxu6alv5dri7qg42b9x3zeiuzhep9q67
https://app.box.com/s/38uqv6xw2itgdg9sr7ljfvobvg4nyhhk
https://app.box.com/s/1rhgz5kfpcnghr72kt4qmaaqxmm5u3lq

The gate would be the most strongly defended part of the castle, subjecting an attacker to crossbow fire, as well as fire from light canons and later archebuses. - Fuse-muskets.
https://app.box.com/s/0ux02q0wdyy83wt4nljfkyv3r3f5uvni

Attack from the rear, then! Yeah, but attack what?
https://app.box.com/s/7oooujrxqdbsx4qvxk8bgpcziyqaqr7h

Spøttrup was a fully modern building with excellent toilet facilities. Here is the, ahem, exit from one of the toilets. There are as you may have noticed several: https://app.box.com/s/sttwt7yza8pz9qofmw77peegn1fvo33i
Ha! You think. I've seen Jean Claude van Dumb climb up such a toilet entrance in a film. - Yeah, if he could get past the iron bars up the exit...
It happened an attacker got stuck and eventually died in such exits. Not that it prevented the inhabitants of the castle from still using the toilet...
The Teutonic castles which are pretty similar to Spøttrup, had toilet-towers. Build out in the moat, and connected to castle via passage ways. That lessened the stench. But no such tower at Spøttrup.

But lets go through the gate and into the courtyard.
here you can better see the sentry-corridors beside the gate-tower: https://app.box.com/s/4368gpyoy07tbmpkbapj033e093pyvxm
The view from the sentry corridors is pretty good. Offering excellent firing positions for crossbow men: https://app.box.com/s/riqo1yrvs45dmmtbld0bl4x6qstqzn2n
Bows were no longer used in war around the Baltic Sea. Crossbows was the standard weapon now and very, very efficient!
Bows only served a use in the open field during raids, and due to the rate of fire rather than for range and penetration.

The two stair towers are a later addition, but still efficient for protection as you'll have to fight your way up the winding stairs.
https://app.box.com/s/rto1u8ssptwrom6arx0zfj4n1c5dpmwd
https://app.box.com/s/9gjgqrvek1og2n4qdrkj0qebuuln75oj

Let's go inside. Plenty of room. Notice the light artillery pieces. They were state of the art by the late 1400's. And well suited for the defense of such a castle: https://app.box.com/s/ranqu1jxk4odbixt68baoas6cs6mlvt0

This corner of the castle originally had a low building, but that is now gone: https://app.box.com/s/6er4vdqscu0fny0gpou789zefublhbe7
But often this would be an exit for fishing in the moat. There would deliberately be fish in the moat for additional food. Or alternatively to dump bodies.

But who lived, fought at and visited such a castle? Loads of reenactors descend on the castle every year, in more or less correct attire.
Here we have a monk, being called into the HR department I presume...
https://app.box.com/s/2efzrvu8qa5bhvgc3a9w90z4f6ysjfqa
The men at arms are from the 1200's. The halberds are a bit anachronistic. But the halberd on the left is a typical heavy combat-halberds. The great helmets were the latest military equipment in the early 1200's.

Here we see a pretty affluent man walking by some multi-gender monks, anno 1400 or so: https://app.box.com/s/nf14vi79jeejcznrngx7muan1g67tdlr

Here we see a merry group of maidens run out from the castle on a summers day in 1300'something. https://app.box.com/s/9wkmur6g3ovvww9cs4pd7hx0oz5l4w8m All of them, except the lady in the middle are unmarried. Otherwise they would wear a head scarve as a mark of their status. Being bare-foot was practical if the weather was good. Why wear out perfectly good shoes? They are lightly attired. People back then washed their undergarments regularly, but outer garments, like a dress or a coat would rarely, if ever, be washed in order to preserve the colors and sometimes also to keep the clothes reasonably water-proof.

Boys trying to shoot with bow and arrow. In this part of Europe, bows were for hunting and sport, not war.
https://app.box.com/s/4fm3pxm84mrhpxedgae61bo9x9sqvjls
The famed English (Welsh) longbow, took years to master and you had to be pretty strong in order to fire one. A crossbow could be fired by pretty much everyone, including women, and required only a minimum of training to fire. That the range and rate of fire was less than the longbow was considered of minor importance around the Baltic Sea.
Poachers and hunters and rebellious peasants were fond of the bow though: https://app.box.com/s/bf2bokzd6r9dl7c38rtz8brs9min7nd3
But very few mastered anything resembling a longbow.

Two unmarried and one married women having a frank exchange of opinions: https://app.box.com/s/gmw5ircx2vas8ktkbnyykj1wz9bl1hql
These are, perhaps with the exception of the woman in yellow, free women. I.e. not serfs. That is their families owned their own land.
Bare underarms were by this time still considered sexy!
People in the middle age, absolutely loved colors! The more garish the better! They would, if at all possible, wear colorful clothes.

But this time bishops no longer went to war in person. Well, they were really not supposed to go to war. And if they did, they should preferably not spill blood. So in comes the war-club, later developing into the maze seen here: https://app.box.com/s/zod21eants6umfksja26h1nn1ct0v0o1
A very excellent weapon. That would break an arm, smash a rib or two or at least dent the armor so much that it was extremely uncomfortable to wear.

By the time it was decided to build Spøttrup full-suited combat armor had almost reached the height of its developments, as seen from these two men-at-arms fighting here. Notice the parrying shield used by the man on the right: https://app.box.com/s/0g4ohruweipif5qnqjlz4y1b9pvlg143

Men-at-arms from around 1400. By now heavy armor-piecing weapons was the norm and the large shields had almost been abandoned: https://app.box.com/s/67keh5czeftx3398qk1fbsxxbsau7izi

Two what we today would label upper-middle class married women, anno 1400-something. They are both mistresses of their households, which can be seen from the keys they are wearing from their belts as a symbol of their status: https://app.box.com/s/7f6fwdqxmzk7roiglurvki3x6p9bu8uz

Let's end this with two last views of Spøttrup castle: https://app.box.com/s/71jwd9zvctf01diu3y7mw9myqxm2la60
https://app.box.com/s/1omjerxotx3z4h4ge7aldl439ojmkvnw
Mange tak Muhler How wonderful your explanation of the castle: even more astonishing is the interest of so many young people coming out to re-enact Danish history in this very special place! Clearly, history still lives among the Danes!
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  #304  
Old 08-01-2017, 07:04 PM
Muhler's Avatar
Majesty
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Eastern Jutland, Denmark
Posts: 9,999
You are welcome, Gerry.

Lets go to Borreby Manor.

https://app.box.com/s/13zrpm5aixnixm05jw76d2e13aqnbalx

The manor is well chosen, because it has grown over the years with buildings being added, while the older buildings have remained. That means the estate is a little messy in its layout, but someone interested in architecture you can compare how the fashion changed by looking at the buildings.
The manor is first mentioned in 1345.
The main building is from 1556 and from the beginning designed as a fortified manor house. As was back then a pretty conservative building...
One of the reasons why Borreby is so well preserved is that it's a bit out of the way. It has been spared much raiding, fires and demolition.
In fact the manor is protected by two moats. One moat protects the stables and barns of the estate. And from there you have to cross the second moat to get to the manor house itself, which you will see later has several gun-ports.
The manor was build at a time when wars between Sweden and Denmark was the order of the day, so it had to be able to fend off raiding parties.
When that sorts of things happened, often with very short warning, the family of a manor barred the gates to the manor, tried to get as much livestock to safety as possible, distributed weapons to servants and family members and prepared to fight. They were to hold until the raiders moved on or in the worst case until relief arrived. Such manors, because they were very compact, could be held successfully by surprisingly few people! Certainly by as few a ten men, very much aided by the women. (There would be no doubt what would happen to them if the manor was stormed by raiders or marauders!)

The first known owner of the place was a yeoman, Niels Jensen. Later on the family took the noble name Urne, but they are AFAIK died out.
Prior to the Feud of the Count (civil war) the manor belonged to the Roskilde bishop, but when the civil war ended, the Reformation was a reality and it went to the crown.

in 1553, it went to the noble Friis Family, which is still around.
It was Johan Friis who build the manor house.
Then to the now extinct Daa family.
In 1783 the Carstenschiold family took over the place and it has been in their possession ever since.
The current owner is Joachim Lorentz Holten Carstenschiold, here seen with his wife: https://app.box.com/s/38k5esz5tdw8pbvxalrgnvb5mjyrayyg
Joachim Carstenschiold is a courtier, which is far from uncommon in the Carstenschiold family. The family is also pretty close the Regent Couple.

But let us look at the manor from above: https://app.box.com/s/8cai4fqt3k4zn6bjuzwf7la326vhm7y3
https://app.box.com/s/h70zju949p0j0mwxap4n15d4vgyczyxq
https://app.box.com/s/00y1g219jyw15bz643rza76se48hm969

When you approach the estate, you come to the first moat, and on the other side is the gate house, which doubled as the first line of defense.
https://app.box.com/s/2e7wc8pc8jg5bgm84647bdihhswsunzi
https://app.box.com/s/m29trkmvsk1dbxxcq05zx02j7e33ngsp
As you can see it's a very solid building, complete with a portcullis.

The stone bridge is new, from 1864. Previously such a bridge was made from wood, and the planks on the bridge could be removed quickly.
https://app.box.com/s/dhlktfjoj6qq6zfvqk5uuc54c0uff2no
https://app.box.com/s/inpl0f9k6fwuurgbhsf7xtef30odyfxz
https://app.box.com/s/zo1tgota4i9nvshthbxzgpfzbh990m5l

Once through the gate house you enter the courtyard, which is surrounded on three sides by barns, stables and all sorts of buildings needed as such a manor.
https://app.box.com/s/th6dei48om72kw6ur28pj36nl4njvf0n
https://app.box.com/s/pbvrezujt6mh3qbob0kqcusgzez0falf
This is the working place of the estate, and still well protected by a moat.
https://app.box.com/s/yytk867iuzjcvhqf4nm952xf9xlt4p3w
https://app.box.com/s/vomh3rii9btdurjt2zrzfi5s9a3yfell

To one side of the courtyard is of course the manor house itself, across another moat.
https://app.box.com/s/s2hsc7pi8z7taq1eyzoxhkhih1tqr37a
On the opposite end of the courtyard is a more modern bridge across the moat, offering a more spectacular view of the manor house:
With or without a renaissance lady. https://app.box.com/s/qqoub569oxq0us01pm4b8o70ubqgbdjr
https://app.box.com/s/i8blodn9jsjruhw6u8k4bushv7yesq2r

But let us circle the manor house, to one side there is even a little garden.
https://app.box.com/s/yyknyj5fgl4i4au7wrfvv72xm6wxxrhd
https://app.box.com/s/gv3i56pdqitxefs1no6a3qicp8i9x5qc
https://app.box.com/s/mc1obbq500e7fdyogtzxyjzlzjxvsu93
https://app.box.com/s/aakw7vv1oyojmr78kshcp91gjmw1gvcc
https://app.box.com/s/zo0ju1tvq2g8pkdgxfum5cuczotl3miq
https://app.box.com/s/gdexi2l9gocufd5l7m66rduhf0ls1cx6
https://app.box.com/s/7zjgddgw35ozty6neeu6tulyrrpa5a0x

Because of the, for Danish manors, very unusual style, Borreby is pretty spooky to look at in the dark, and that is very much exploited!
https://app.box.com/s/tnrfifvm0x4mreampg22ijoiqpuukivj
https://app.box.com/s/k807c76bs07mca2okycnwehakb5o8dyd
https://app.box.com/s/7we6qkkjk7bphnp9o93ra9579a8ai0pc
https://app.box.com/s/jwfgdcol8kccbohqe1avw7c987yxecju

Joachim Carstenschiold actually considered a career within acting, and he has set up a theater at the manor, whit regular performances. The theater is located in one of the larger barns:
https://app.box.com/s/j1t3b4ktv1prl365238wonj4mwfbxit8
https://app.box.com/s/0datw4wwxtkbuj96ol8yamzigyxet217

There are also regular theme-nights about the many stories about ghosts and other haunted creatures at Borreby, designed to spook late night visitors.
With good reason because the manor has it share of ghosts!
One of them is not a ghost as such, but a doppelganger.
That was Frederik Berregaard, who lived at the manor in the 1700's. There were many stories of him being seen at one end of the manor, only moments later to be seen at the other end. Apparently he couldn't control his talent, and he went into a fit of rage one time, when he saw himself in the library!
Screams of help from the moat is not uncommon either. In fact several rescue attempts have been started, due to the screams - but there is no one in distress...
Another infamous figure is Valdemar Daa. During the disastrous wars between Denmark and Sweden in the 1600's He was pretty much ruined, so he tried dabbling with alchemy in the hope of producing gold. Alas in vain. But he is still encountered here and there, working on his experiments in making gold.
Then there is Ove Rand, who took over after Valdemar Daa. His economy wasn't much better, so it was rumored he sold his soul to the Devil, in exchange for getting a better economy.
Shortly before he died in 1693, a big black hell-hound with flaming eyes appeared in his study. Stared at him for a while, then went into another room, where there was no other way out, and vanished.
The hell-hound is still seen, but now always outside the manor. The last time it was seen was in 2003.

Oh yes, such a manor always has a tea pavilion. Here placed a bit outside the whole picture, in a clearing near the manor: https://app.box.com/s/9a2sdx6spa2n07yit0rxnc0cwgxgrbc4

The manor is located not far from the barracks of the Guards Hussars and from time to time some hussars drop by: https://app.box.com/s/aj0zuejzobtbsbn8ox1m5glsvnj5qizh

And finally a couple of drawings to show that not much has changed at Borreby: https://app.box.com/s/i2r9mtks3a0r8bpd1j893dj2fbpkz26w
https://app.box.com/s/aqoiabzpwcutl0jccx7m08c4byelwous
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Old 10-21-2017, 10:06 AM
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The Palace has shared a gallery of nice, atmospheric autumn shots of the family's castles Amalienborg, Marselisborg, Gråsten and Fredensborg:


** kongehuset.dk gallery: Efterår på de kongelige slotte **
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  #306  
Old 12-07-2017, 03:20 PM
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Three lovely photos of Dannebrog.
Right now she is at Naval Station Frederikshavn, being refitted for next years new crew of conscripts.
So she may look like this for the summer cruises next year - and since it's Frederik's 50th birthday I'm willing to bet a bottle of schnapps that M&F are doing the cruises next year.

https://app.box.com/s/zur8unwekxcqxc2xpi33kva9qaggqwyx
https://app.box.com/s/1xkay1horgjz1d3o3mo5trd6jcbraupd
https://app.box.com/s/1qhqbrgs6y02ebjyifuyck9ihvdbms4j
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Old 12-07-2017, 03:44 PM
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I hope so. It has been a while since their last summer cruise. And the kids are older so a bit easier I think.

The pictures are amazing. thank you
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  #308  
Old 12-07-2017, 05:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Muhler View Post
Three lovely photos of Dannebrog.
Right now she is at Naval Station Frederikshavn, being refitted for next years new crew of conscripts.
So she may look like this for the summer cruises next year - and since it's Frederik's 50th birthday I'm willing to bet a bottle of schnapps that M&F are doing the cruises next year.

https://app.box.com/s/zur8unwekxcqxc2xpi33kva9qaggqwyx
https://app.box.com/s/1xkay1horgjz1d3o3mo5trd6jcbraupd
https://app.box.com/s/1qhqbrgs6y02ebjyifuyck9ihvdbms4j
It's huge and very classic
Does it belong to the whole royal family or only to F&M ?
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Old 12-07-2017, 05:24 PM
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The Dannebrog is the Danish royal yacht. So it does not belong to the crown prince couple. Not sure whether it formally is the queen's or that they arranged it differently. It dates from before even the queen was born.
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Old 12-07-2017, 05:59 PM
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Dannebrog is the first ship (the flagship, so to speak) in the Danish Navy, which means all other navy ships salute her.

Anyway, she is officially classified as an auxiliary ship, a hospital ship to be correct. But of course having been constructed in the early 1930's she's hopelessly unsuited for that role. Her NATO number is A540.
In reality she is a floating residence put at disposal for the DRF. In a country consisting of a peninsula and hundreds of islands, that is very practical. - And security wise it also makes a lot of sense, not to mention that it's cheaper with a mobile residence, rather than having a royal entourage sign in at hotels all over the country, having to unpack and repack every day during the summer tours of DK.

Being captain of Dannebrog means you are the personal captain of the Monarch. That also means the captain is the first of the adjutants.
Commanding Dannebrog is the finest post a navy captain can have and that means the captain of Dannebrog formally outranks all other captains (i.e. commanders of a ship).

Serving as a conscript is a very popular posting and in fact there is a several year waiting list for serving there and as such the conscripts are all volunteers. (Volunteer conscripts in general constitute some 98 % of those called up for national service annually).

She has more than 300.000 nautical miles under her keel.
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