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  #521  
Old 07-12-2019, 05:07 AM
eya eya is offline
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Today the Crown Princess's meeting room by the Artist Eske Kath


https://www.facebook.com/detdanskeko...7493209138679/
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  #522  
Old 07-12-2019, 06:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Muhler View Post

It's a painting I don't like!
I don't know if I can offer a rational reason, I simply find it disturbing and uncomfortable to look at.
I guess this was the purpose of the painter. Afterall a war is one of the worst experiences humans can have. The palace is not just a home for the CP Family it is still a public building and the war in Afghanistan unfortunatly part of the current reality.
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  #523  
Old 07-12-2019, 12:51 PM
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Originally Posted by eya View Post
Today the Crown Princess's meeting room by the Artist Eske Kath


https://www.facebook.com/detdanskeko...7493209138679/
Thanks, Eya.

The psychedelic ceiling actually depict the sun, in the shape of the central rosetta, emerging through the clouds of a storm that has just passed.
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  #524  
Old 07-12-2019, 12:58 PM
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Originally Posted by eya View Post
Today the Crown Princess's meeting room by the Artist Eske Kath


https://www.facebook.com/detdanskeko...7493209138679/
I like this one very much, I just wish the camera would pan back so that we could see the total effect in the room. Some of the art on the walls looks very interesting as well.
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  #525  
Old 07-13-2019, 04:28 AM
eya eya is offline
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Today's video:

"At various levels, the stories about the Danish Galathea 3 expedition and James Cook and Abel Tasman's explorations, which helped to set Australia and the island of Tasmania on the world map, are merged together in Morten Scheldes wall painting in Frederik VIII's Palace at Amalienborg."

https://www.facebook.com/detdanskeko...72420847/?t=16

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bz2RcEdg-Uc/

In what used to be King Frederik and Queen Ingrid's living room, The Crown Prince today arranged his meeting room.

https://www.facebook.com/detdanskeko...98728341/?t=18

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bz40VRigo2a/

Sunset over Amalienborg!


https://scontent.fath3-4.fna.fbcdn.n...62&oe=5E10989C
https://scontent.fath3-4.fna.fbcdn.n...b7&oe=5DCED4EA
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  #526  
Old 07-13-2019, 06:16 AM
Muhler's Avatar
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Thanks, Eya.

The painting contains references to sea voyages.
Navigation, in the way that make a line from two stars in The Big Dipper (I think it's called in English. It's Karlsvognen in Danish) to the North Star - helping you to navigate.
The sailing ship is a direct reference to the voyage that opened up Australia for colonization by Europeans. I believe however that Endeavour was smaller though. She was IIRC a collier purchased by the Navy.
The gangway is from Vædderen, the retired frigate that went on the second Danish Galathea scientific expedition, which Frederik was involved in.
The two grails are a reference to M&F's wedding.
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  #527  
Old 07-13-2019, 01:36 PM
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I like the painting, a love the two histories together.
Thanks Eya
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  #528  
Old 07-14-2019, 07:50 AM
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Thanks, Eya.

The room depicts the geographic backgrounds of the CP couple, with emphasis on Tasmania and Denmark (and Greenland), with the world between them.
With a lot of personal subtleties from the lives of M&F incorporated here and there.

I don't care much for this though. I find it confusing, dark and not particularly inspiring. Depressing actually. We have plenty of gloomy and grey days here in DK, so no need to decorate the inside of our homes that way as well.
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  #529  
Old 09-10-2019, 03:34 AM
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https://jyllands-posten.dk/indland/E...es-mod-terror/

Slots- og Kulturstyrelsen - the department that look after and maintain (the exterior) of buildings owned by the state (most royal residences being among them) has decided to close off the square at Amalienborg for cars.
The square is actually a public roundabout used mainly by taxis as a short cut, I understand.

But there are many people on the square even on a daily basis, not least at the changing of the guards at noon. And as there is a considerable risk of someone using a truck or just a car it has now been decided to close the square.
People on foot and bicycle can still go there freely.

I presume they will do something like they did at Christiansborg (the Parliament), set up a massive barrier, but make it decorative and almost a part of the overall architecture.

Why haven't they done it before, you might ask?
I guess there are mainly two reasons for that.
A) They might have hoped that the permanent presence of a number of armed guards and police officers would be sufficient to deter most, but the most determined, attackers. (Most who attack with a truck or a car are amateurs.)
B) It was hoped/wished it would be possible to keep the square as free for the public as possible. The DRF has always prided itself of never hiding behind barriers.

Vans and cars will of course still be able to enter the square, presumably through a checkpoint. And there are rear-entrances to at least some of the mansions for cars as well.

Well, better safe than sorry, I hope they will come up with something decorative as barriers.

Here is the barrier at Christiansborg: https://jyllands-posten.dk/pictures/...ing-mod-terror

ADDED;
More details:

https://politiken.dk/indland/art7378...res-mod-terror

The four entrances to the square will be blocked by bronze-coated steel-pillars than can be raised or lowered into the ground as needed.
At the same time the cobbled stones covering the square will be extended out to the pillars in order to create a more aesthetically pleasing impression.

It is the same firm that created the terror-barrier at Christiansborg, that is behind this one as well.

The work is expected to be finished in time for QMII's birthday next year.
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  #530  
Old 09-11-2019, 06:07 AM
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Let's go back in time.

This year it's 225 years ago the Royal Lifeguard regiment started their watch at Amalienborg. When the DRF moved in there in fact, after the main residence, Christiansborg, burned to the ground.
The first watch was on 10. March 1794.

It was in fact only a temporary residence until a new Christiansborg Palace was build. That was of course expected to take a number of years. When Christiansborg was finished the DRF had long since settled in at Amalienborg and liked living there. So to make a long story short: Amalienborg remained the main residence.

The changing of the guards is an old tradition.
Here is a photo from a festive day in 1906: https://app.box.com/s/u0egobmx0gqjq8qwmzbedr7aqlwnaxu5

The guardsmen, as one of the few Danish regiments of the time, consisted of regulars. While most other regiments had a cadre of regular NCO's and officers with the privates almost exclusively consisting of conscripts.
That changed in 1947, when the Royal Lifeguard Regiment also became a regiment of mainly conscripts.
Today the regiment is a mix of conscripts and professionals.

During WWII there was an ever present danger of Copenhagen being bombed from the air, but the sentries were not to leave their posts, so what to do?
Armored sentry boxes! In case of bombs falling over Copenhagen, the sentries could find shelter here and still remain on post.
https://app.box.com/s/owle24md8wqefhuba54ow00s2qepzn0v

Over so many years there has of course been a number of incidents at Amalienborg. Not least during WWII.
One such incident took place on 29th August 1943, when the collaboration with Germany stopped, the government resigned. This was expected by the Germans who stepped in to disarm what was left of the Danish military - leading to skirmishes in various places.
At Amalienborg a German lieutenant ordered one of his soldiers to the roof of the residential mansion, where Christian X lived, to haul down the Danneborg with the royal crest that always fly there when the Monarch is in residence. In fact shortly after the Occupation in 1940 Christian X had decreed that this flag should fly 24/7 whether he was in residence or not.
Anyway, the flag was hauled down and it came to an altercation with a courtier, who managed to seize the Dannebrog.
Upon hearing what happened, Christian X ordered the flagpole removed. The swastika would never fly over Amalienborg!

Another dramatic incident took place a Saturday evening, 27th July 1811.
Frederik VI rode back to his mansion and dismounted and when about to walk up the stairs he was accosted by a man requesting an audience. The King refused as it was late. The man could return the next day.
The man drew a pistol and the King drew his saber. A few seconds later the man was pointing no less than two pistols at the King's adjutant.
At that point a guardsman, Jeppe Johansen Skodborg, came to the aid, grabbed the man by the neck and held him down until other guardsmen arrived.
It turned out that man was an insane Swedish hussar who was madly in love with Princess Juliane, the King's cousin. And he had in fact got an injunction telling him to stay clear of her.
Attacking the King is a serious matter! Not least in the days of Absolutism, so the Swede was sentenced to death by the Supreme Court.
That was however changed by the King to life in prison.
The Swede died in prison in 1834.
Guardsman Skodborg got an order for his action that evening.
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  #531  
Old 09-11-2019, 04:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Muhler View Post
Another dramatic incident took place a Saturday evening, 27th July 1811.
Frederik VI rode back to his mansion and dismounted and when about to walk up the stairs he was accosted by a man requesting an audience. The King refused as it was late. The man could return the next day.
The man drew a pistol and the King drew his saber. A few seconds later the man was pointing no less than two pistols at the King's adjutant.
At that point a guardsman, Jeppe Johansen Skodborg, came to the aid, grabbed the man by the neck and held him down until other guardsmen arrived.
It turned out that man was an insane Swedish hussar who was madly in love with Princess Juliane, the King's cousin. And he had in fact got an injunction telling him to stay clear of her.
Attacking the King is a serious matter! Not least in the days of Absolutism, so the Swede was sentenced to death by the Supreme Court.
That was however changed by the King to life in prison.
The Swede died in prison in 1834.
Guardsman Skodborg got an order for his action that evening.
Fascinating. It's surprising to hear that this sort of thing was already occurring in 1811/the days of absolute monarchy ...
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  #532  
Old 09-11-2019, 04:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Tatiana Maria View Post
Fascinating. It's surprising to hear that this sort of thing was already occurring in 1811/the days of absolute monarchy ...
Yes, you'd think a guy like that would simply be thrown in a prison somewhere and forgotten.
But no, since medieval times, when the first national laws were written down, people were absolutely obsessed with the law!
It may come as a surprise to many, it certainly was to me, that people back then knew there rights, they knew the law and they stood their ground when they felt they had the law on their side.
From 1300 and up was a great time to be a lawyer in DK! - And not only in DK but in most countries in Europe at the time.
What was written down as law, was basically considered sacrosanct and people knew it. (*)

Kings and nobles, even when absolutism was introduced, ruled according to and based on the law. Otherwise they would be tyrants. - And you were not morally obligated to be loyal to a king who was a tyrant, i.e. who ruled outside the law, or ruled breaking the law.

Of course there was misuse of power all the time, by people in power in particular, that was part of life. But as long as it wasn't too openly and too frequently it was accepted as a reality of life.

But on a day to day basis and on a local level, people were very much aware of their legal rights: "Squire Hans son here has - again - led his cattle across my field and let them drink from my stretch of the creek. Your Honor, I demand a compensation. It says so here in Danish Law that I'm entitled to (an x amount or an ox) for the use of my land, my grass and my water!" - Even if the one they complained about was a notch or two higher up the social ladder.

It's incredibly fascinating!

I guess this obsession with the law, especially in late medieval times, was because even to ordinary people, the letter of the law was the only guarantee people had in regards to their rights, in an otherwise pretty unfair society.

So that an absolute King went to the court to get a restraining order against a mere hussar (albeit a cornet. - I.e. a kind of adult officer's apprentice) is completely within the mindset of the time. Even if the king had the power to send the hussar to the West Indies to die of fever, if he wanted to, he would be careful not to do that, and thus be accused of being a tyrant. - Apart from the fact that it is difficult to demand that ordinary people live in accordance with the law, when the ruler don't...
Even absolute kings were keen on having a good image.

(*) Writing down rules was almost a favorite pass-time! Every club, society and fellowship imaginable wrote down detailed rules, which everyone involved signed and adhered to strictly in times of dispute. Mercenary companies and even pirates have some wonderful examples of very detailed rules. - Some of them are actually very modern in their mindset and as fair as was possible.
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  #533  
Old 09-11-2019, 05:05 PM
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If I recall correctly, Queen Margrethe spoke about the open square in the documentary of the Queen's Palaces at DR a couple of years ago. What I remember from QMII speaking is that there have been discussions of shutting off the traffic at the square previously, but she didn't fancy it. She preffered it as a busy square or intersection and not an abandoned place.
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  #534  
Old 09-11-2019, 06:31 PM
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It will be sad that it will have to be shut off but a necessity really in this day and age, the risk of people using vehicles to target either the buildings themselves, the RF or - more likely perhaps - crowds gathered outside, is just too great.
Still it sounds as if people will still be able to walk through freely so its not like the RF will suddenly have no one looking in through the windows and be shut up behind gates.
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  #535  
Old 09-11-2019, 06:33 PM
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Is there a palace chapel or given the close proximity of the Marble Church/Frederik's Church there was no need?
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  #536  
Old 09-11-2019, 06:40 PM
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As the buildings were originally just regular mansions (if such a thing exists) I would suspect not.
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  #537  
Old 09-11-2019, 09:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Muhler View Post
Yes, you'd think a guy like that would simply be thrown in a prison somewhere and forgotten.
But no, since medieval times, when the first national laws were written down, people were absolutely obsessed with the law!
It may come as a surprise to many, it certainly was to me, that people back then knew there rights, they knew the law and they stood their ground when they felt they had the law on their side.
From 1300 and up was a great time to be a lawyer in DK! - And not only in DK but in most countries in Europe at the time.
What was written down as law, was basically considered sacrosanct and people knew it. (*)

Kings and nobles, even when absolutism was introduced, ruled according to and based on the law. Otherwise they would be tyrants. - And you were not morally obligated to be loyal to a king who was a tyrant, i.e. who ruled outside the law, or ruled breaking the law.

Of course there was misuse of power all the time, by people in power in particular, that was part of life. But as long as it wasn't too openly and too frequently it was accepted as a reality of life.

But on a day to day basis and on a local level, people were very much aware of their legal rights: "Squire Hans son here has - again - led his cattle across my field and let them drink from my stretch of the creek. Your Honor, I demand a compensation. It says so here in Danish Law that I'm entitled to (an x amount or an ox) for the use of my land, my grass and my water!" - Even if the one they complained about was a notch or two higher up the social ladder.

It's incredibly fascinating!

I guess this obsession with the law, especially in late medieval times, was because even to ordinary people, the letter of the law was the only guarantee people had in regards to their rights, in an otherwise pretty unfair society.

So that an absolute King went to the court to get a restraining order against a mere hussar (albeit a cornet. - I.e. a kind of adult officer's apprentice) is completely within the mindset of the time. Even if the king had the power to send the hussar to the West Indies to die of fever, if he wanted to, he would be careful not to do that, and thus be accused of being a tyrant. - Apart from the fact that it is difficult to demand that ordinary people live in accordance with the law, when the ruler don't...
Even absolute kings were keen on having a good image.

(*) Writing down rules was almost a favorite pass-time! Every club, society and fellowship imaginable wrote down detailed rules, which everyone involved signed and adhered to strictly in times of dispute. Mercenary companies and even pirates have some wonderful examples of very detailed rules. - Some of them are actually very modern in their mindset and as fair as was possible.
My surprise originated more from a member of the public falling in love with a royal to the point of insanity (in an era before television and royals mixing with ordinary citizens), but yes, it was also surprising that a regular legal procedure existed to manage the problem and that an absolute monarch utilized it! Thank you for the further information; fascinating indeed.
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  #538  
Old 09-12-2019, 11:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Tatiana Maria View Post
My surprise originated more from a member of the public falling in love with a royal to the point of insanity (in an era before television and royals mixing with ordinary citizens), but yes, it was also surprising that a regular legal procedure existed to manage the problem and that an absolute monarch utilized it! Thank you for the further information; fascinating indeed.
Ah, I see.

Well, the DRF anno 1811 were perhaps even more accessible to the public than today - if you happened to live in Copenhagen that it.
Copenhagen was a city of 100.000 people, all crammed together in an incredible limited space. So every Copenhagener would likely meet and certainly see members of the DRF fairly often.
You would see the King go for a Sunday stroll along the redoubts around the city with his family. (In fact there is a painting of that, should anyone be interested.)
There is also a wonderful story about the King rowing the Queen I think. He was heading for the shore while a group of people were watching, bt he misjudged the speed of the boat, so it slammed into the bank, causing the king to fall back in the boat. - Then a voice from the crowd was heard saying: "He's just as good at steering as running the country!"
(From a history book by the late historian Palle Lauring.)
The distance between top and bottom could be surprisingly short back then.

Anyway, it is very likely our Swede, who for whatever reason was in Copenhagen, would have seen Princess Juliane, pretty close up several times. And then fallen madly in love with her.
He must also have tried to physically contact her and therefore got a restraining order. But again, people were probably more tolerant of those who were slightly insane back then. After all, there being no medication and few asylums, madness in various forms must have been a normal part of the daily picture.
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  #539  
Old 11-15-2019, 03:08 AM
eya eya is offline
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November morning at Amalienborg!!


Like a painting!

https://scontent.fath3-4.fna.fbcdn.n...1f&oe=5E478238

https://www.instagram.com/p/B44GOvPAUky/
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  #540  
Old 11-15-2019, 03:49 AM
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Beautiful photograph Eya. There is nothing like the magical dawn of a new day.
Very interesting history thank you Muhler.
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