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  #41  
Old 11-09-2018, 11:50 PM
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William and Harry both have personalities that reflect who they are and are totally different in demeanor but one thing is obvious and that is that they both reflect traits from the parents.

Its the differences that make them all stand out as the individuals that they are.
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  #42  
Old 11-09-2018, 11:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Zaira View Post
... I wish we could have heard from Charles' siblings as well...the bit were Charles tickled Anne while they were waiting for the CW Reception was just adorable!
I think the bit of humorous interactions that we saw from all of the royals behind-the-scenes of the Commonwealth event and at other moments in this documentary, are fun and insightful. We really didn't need to see a whole lot from Charles' siblings. I don't believe that Charles has been particularly close to any of his siblings over the years.

Charles and Anne likely have more of an intimate understanding as the oldest children of QEII & Pip, plus they are closer in age too. Prince Charles and Prince Andrew reportedly are known to not get along well. And I think Prince Edward being the youngest child, also led to him and Charles necessarily not having a particularly close relationship over the years. Charles was the young 'action man prince' experiencing his young adult adventures while Edward was still growing up.

The 'royal firm' are simply a larger-than-life family who are on a huge public and historic, soap-operatic stage. That surely requires them to have the capacity for humor, and self-deprecation. The current British royals, I believe, have always generally been known to have high-spirited fun with each other, as passed down via the Queen Mother's fun-loving upbringing in Scotland with her large family.

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Originally Posted by Somebody View Post
I loved his 'I am not that stupid' remark.

It was also interesting how William stressed that he is his own man (he is clearly not aspiring his father's work ethic). And Charles also acknowledged that what he has done over his lifetime is just one way of fulfilling his role but he doesn't see it as a blueprint for future generations.
Yes, very true. And it does make sense that they are and will be different, as the Queen has been different, as she has slowly matured and evolved over the course of her reign with the changing times.

I don't think we as the public fully realize just how 'not stupid' the British royal family are, and have been for the most part over the course of history, but particularly in the current modern age.

The British royals appear to be in a good place right now and are enjoying increased worldwide attention and popularity as the younger generation come to the fore. That's in thanks no small part to the hard times the 'royal firm' has endured which has led to greater understanding, however tragic, public and painful. It's all credit due to the royal family how they have responded to the challenges they have faced, individually and collectively. The loving marriages of William and Harry have played a significant role in this current feeling of renewal, happy relationships, and future promise.


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Originally Posted by Osipi View Post
... As Charles approaches 70, he's in a good place in both his public and private life. He's come into his own and just watching him, you no longer get the sense of negative emotions that were quite visible around him for some periods of his life. He's happy and it shows on his face wherever he goes. ...

Those two boys grew up with knowing that if you're going to talk the talk, you also walk the walk. Both William and Harry grew up with parents that taught them to look outside of themselves and see around them where change is needed ... Yet, Charles is an "everyday" man that loves his private time talking to turkeys and digging and planting and is always on the go and thinking of different ways he can make a difference. He sets his mind to something and although it may drive people crazy at times, he wants results and gets them. This is a man that takes long walks to relax... As he does grow older, perhaps he will slow down a bit as his wife and kids want him to and just enjoy what's around him but Charles knows that his biggest role is yet to come... He has his sons to take up the banner of making a difference and fighting for change. He's taught them well.

The best is yet to come.
Thanks for sharing that post from the Jobson bio thread @Osipi. I agree with your observations. This new documentary has revealed more to me about how active and productive Charles is. Even though I did know about Charles' many projects and accomplishments, I learned a lot more in detail, which is enlightening and uplifting.

What we've usually heard more about re Charles, is his penchant for having a large staff and the best care re his style of living. I actually think there's nothing wrong with taking advantage of living a luxurious lifestyle. That's the way Charles was raised. Princess Anne is said to have once jokingly given Prince Charles the gift of a portable, fur-covered toilet seat. Charles is clearly also frugal and practical in certain important respects pertaining to upkeep of the palaces, royal duty expenses, turning out lights, and cleaning up litter as part of our duty to the environment.

IMO, a characteristic that is harder to develop and to embody every day is indeed what Prince Charles has in spades: an enormous sense of duty and responsibility. He clearly deeply cares about people and the dangers that are impacting humanity in these cautionary times.

As I've always said, and what has always been apparent is that William and Harry are the best things that came out of the marriage between Charles & Diana. "God works in mysterious ways, his wonders to perform."
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  #43  
Old 11-10-2018, 12:02 AM
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Originally Posted by jacqui24 View Post
I don’t want to get into the debate about If William is off putting or not. But I just want to comment about Harry.

As much as people keep saying William is like Charles, who people claim to be more serious and less affectionate, and Harry being more like his mother in affectionate. I think we can say it’s not true. I actually see a lot of Prince Charles in Harry’s expressiveness. In fact, I always am struck by how similar Charles and Harry are when we see them together. They both like a good time, but are very passionate about certain things. I’m not sure if this was how PoW always was when he was younger, but I certainly see the similarities in personality now.

There was one point in the documentary where Harry made a expression with his face and it was total Diana. Really struck me because typically William is more like his mother in his looks and some of his mannerisms/expressions.

Harry is more like Charles and perhaps even Prince Phillip (at least in looks and probably cheekiness!).

LaRae
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  #44  
Old 11-10-2018, 12:14 AM
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To be clear, I’m not saying Harry is NOT like his mom, but I’m just saying I wouldn’t be so quick to say he’s like Diana and not Charles in being affectionate. In fact, with all the PDA with Meghan, people has always said he’s affectionate because he’s like his mother. But reality is that PoW is also very affectionate with Camilla. They even kissed goodbye in Ireland as they left separately to go to different engagements after a joint engagement. People aren’t really interested, so it doesn’t get reported, but PoW and Camilla are actually quite affectionate and warm.

While I do see Diana in Harry, I see Charles in him too.
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  #45  
Old 11-10-2018, 01:10 AM
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Originally Posted by jacqui24 View Post
I don’t want to get into the debate about If William is off putting or not. But I just want to comment about Harry.

As much as people keep saying William is like Charles, who people claim to be more serious and less affectionate, and Harry being more like his mother in affectionate. I think we can say it’s not true. I actually see a lot of Prince Charles in Harry’s expressiveness. In fact, I always am struck by how similar Charles and Harry are when we see them together. They both like a good time, but are very passionate about certain things. I’m not sure if this was how PoW always was when he was younger, but I certainly see the similarities in personality now.
It's a mix of traits and expressions they both have from both of their parents, I'm sure. Most of all, they each received deep love and understanding from both of their parents, despite their parents' human flaws, and the unavoidable, painful struggles of dealing with their parents' divorce, and later with the tragic loss of their mother.

I still feel that Prince William physically resembles his mother the most, and that Prince Harry has his mother's rebellious, fun-loving, empathetic personality. That doesn't mean they don't each share a mix of traits from both parents that make each of them uniquely who they are as individuals.
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The part of the documentary where Harry and William are reflecting about their Dad's influence on them, which they weren't fully aware of growing up, is typical of families in general. How many of us reach a certain age, and suddenly recognize the importance of lessons we learned from our parents, which we discounted or didn't fully understand as youngsters?

I do think, as is normal, that both William and Harry are growing to understand their father better as they are maturing and raising young children themselves (Harry soon-to-be). In fact, despite William and Harry truly loving and respecting their father, they may have had periods of not always getting along with him in some instances, unsurprisingly. Apparently, they are all three being brought closer together in understanding, which may have been steadily occurring over the past couple of years, as it seems to be depicted in the documentary.

I have seen it mentioned in several articles over the past year, that Meghan has had some influence in pointing out to Harry that he should appreciate his father more. Now, we don't know exactly in what capacity or detail or exact phrasing that may have occurred. The below article states that Prince Charles and Meghan had an instant rapport, and that they have grown even closer since the royal wedding in May. The article indicates that Prince Charles feels Meghan has been the best thing to have happened to Harry, and that Charles has given Meghan the nickname: 'Tungsten,' for her toughness and her unbending nature.

It's worth pointing out I think that Meghan is a Leo, born on the same day as the Queen Mother, who was an important, nurturing influence on Charles. It's possible that Charles sees some of the same strong character traits in Meghan that he witnessed first-hand in his grandmother. It's also so lovely how supportive and understanding Charles has been toward Harry, Meghan, and Meghan's mother, Doria, especially around the time of the royal wedding. It's not a small thing that Prince Charles recommended the Kingdom Choir, and that he chose all of the gorgeous music selections (except for Stand By Me, which was chosen by Meghan & Harry).

https://www.express.co.uk/news/royal...-royal-wedding

The new Vanity Fair profile of Prince Charles includes photos of Charles & Camilla, taken by M&H's engagement & wedding photographer, Alex Lubomirski (who was recommended to Charles by Duchess Meghan):

https://www.hellomagazine.com/royalt...meghan-markle/
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  #46  
Old 11-10-2018, 01:41 AM
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Originally Posted by jacqui24 View Post
To be clear, I’m not saying Harry is NOT like his mom, but I’m just saying I wouldn’t be so quick to say he’s like Diana and not Charles in being affectionate. In fact, with all the PDA with Meghan, people has always said he’s affectionate because he’s like his mother. But reality is that PoW is also very affectionate with Camilla. They even kissed goodbye in Ireland as they left separately to go to different engagements after a joint engagement. People aren’t really interested, so it doesn’t get reported, but PoW and Camilla are actually quite affectionate and warm...
Yes, I think as I said earlier, there's a mix of traits offspring inherit from their parents, which is normal for every family. I haven't seen anyone say that Harry doesn't have some of his father's traits, simply because he takes a lot after his mother's personality in some obvious respects.

It definitely comes across how much in love Camilla and Prince Charles are and have always been, but I do not think any member of the royal family have been as demonstrably affectionate in public to the extent that Harry & Meghan have been. It's probably due in no small part to Meghan's naturally affectionate nature, which is also truthfully how Harry's personality is too, in part because of his mother's openly demonstrative displays of affection. Clearly Prince Charles has also been quite understanding, supportive and loving toward his sons, no question. But fathers and mothers are always uniquely different. Each individual brings something different to every relationship.

I think that Charles was especially understanding in raising his sons to chart their own paths, partly as a result of his not wanting to be overly aggressive and forceful in their upbringing, as his father had been toward him. Thank God for Prince Charles breaking that particular strict, overbearing and harsh royal tradition that had tended to be passed down ever since the dynamic between Queen Victoria and her eldest son, King Edward VII, led to tough relationships between fathers and sons in the British royal family. Albeit that Prince Philip was never as overbearing toward his children as King Edward VII and King George V were. However, Philip simply did not understand nor seem to appreciate Charles' more sensitive nature.
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  #47  
Old 11-10-2018, 02:33 AM
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What struck me was how much the Prince looked like his great-uncle Edward, The Duke of Windsor, at similar age.
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  #48  
Old 11-10-2018, 03:27 AM
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Well, family resemblances are normal, although I don't think there's too much of a resemblance between Prince Charles and the Duke of Windsor. In old age, there may be somewhat of certain facial features and mannerisms they might share. I have been said to share similar mannerisms and some physical resemblance to a maternal aunt whom I unfortunately never got around to meeting because she lived in a different state.
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I got a laugh out of some of the conversation between Prince Charles and QEII, as they were waiting to enter the Commonwealth gathering. Prince Charles mentioned something to the Queen about Frogmore House, and she replied that she hadn't been to Frogmore 'in ages.' Of course, it's only a mile away from Windsor Castle, but the Queen leads a busy existence, in addition to the fact she's slowing down and is not as physically active.

The scene @34:01 in the documentary, is very striking and poignant in which the Queen and Pip are standing on the balcony as Prince Charles lays the Remembrance Day wreath, flanked by Princes William and Harry in their military uniforms. Notably, the wreath is handed to Prince Charles by the Queen's equerry, Ghanian-born Major Nana Kofi Twumasi-Ankrah. The poignant feeling is further heightened by the narrator's voiceover:
"This November, as last, The Prince of Wales will take the Queen's place at the Cenotaph... This scene more than any other with [Prince Charles giving] the serviceman's salute [and his sons standing tall behind him] reveals what the next reign will look like..."

The recent burgeoning popular interest in the British royal family is in part due, I think, to the diversity and inclusivity signalled by Meghan joining the firm. There has also been increasingly visible signs of diversity and inclusion among the British royal staff, particularly with Major Nana's high-level appointment. The younger royals, led by William and Harry, coming to the fore in a positive, up-to-date way, accompanied by talented young staff members, has also been refreshing and advantageous.
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  #49  
Old 11-10-2018, 04:20 AM
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Osipi, thanks for moving my post; I wasn’t aware that this thread existed when I made those comments!

I haven’t had the chance to watch the video yet, so I can only judge by the quotes I’ve read, but William seems fine to me - and I love that he would love his father to have some more down time to spend with his own kids. I do remember that he was a mischievous little boy, but I assume that as he grew up, he probably was taught (given that he was the heir) to be less rambunctious, more reserved in public. He had to grow up quickly, even before his mother’s death, because he was going to eventually be King; then afterwards, I’m sure he also felt protective of Harry and maybe even a bit responsible towards him (as the older brother).

I love that Charles did the opposite of what his father did “for” him. He gave his boys the freedom to develop into the men that they wanted to be instead of trying to force them into being who he wanted them to be. William is a great father, and that’s in large part because he had a wonderful role model in his own. I’m sure Charles wishes he could have been there more for his boys while they were growing up, but his own example of being a parent was his mother being absent so often due to work responsibilities. That didn’t make it any easier for William and Harry, but I think they will understand it more as time goes by.
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  #50  
Old 11-10-2018, 05:11 AM
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I have a favour to ask: Please stop calling William and Harry "the boys"...as I read not only in this thread! These two are married men in their thierties, they have been at the time of their mother´s 20th anniversary of her death already, and William is a family father of three with Prince Harry soon catching up with him...
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  #51  
Old 11-10-2018, 05:22 AM
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Now that I think about it, you've made a good point. They're definitely not boys anymore but full grown men. I'm going to keep that in mind for future posts.
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  #52  
Old 11-10-2018, 06:03 AM
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We witnessed William and Harry as infants being brought out of the hospital by their parents. We've watched them grow up from a distance. Yes, they are no longer boys, but the memories of their youth are still fresh in our minds. Of course they are no longer boys, but those of us who are much older than them, still see them as young, despite the fact they are grown-ups in their 30s. Young people in their 30s actually still have a lot of maturing to do. When/if you reach your late 40s and your 50s and 60s, you discover that truth.

This discussion reminds me of the moment when I realized after interacting with my brother in his late 30s, after I had lived in a different state for many years (when he was growing up in his teens and his twenties), that he was in fact no longer the 'little brother' I remembered and that I was still holding onto in my mind.

It shouldn't be a problem when reminiscing about the childhoods of Prince William and Prince Harry, to reference them in respect to when they were toddlers and little boys.

As I recall hearing reported, Prince Charles did just that in his wedding reception reflections about his 'dear old boy' Harry.
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  #53  
Old 11-10-2018, 07:13 AM
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Delete - duplicate.
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  #54  
Old 11-10-2018, 07:16 AM
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Sorry, but I don’t see the big deal in occasionally referring to William and Harry as Charles’ boys or the “boys”. We all know they’re men, that they are adults, and referring to them occasionally as “his boys” is hardly a cardinal sin. Also, not only is it just easier sometimes to refer to them that way (instead of always saying William and Harry), but it’s another way of calling them Charles’ sons. If we referred to them as boys, as if they were children, that would be another story, but clearly that’s not the case.
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  #55  
Old 11-10-2018, 07:24 AM
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Of couse it is not a big deal.... Most women refer to "going out with the girls" or girlfirends… or men refer to a night out with the boys... Its not a big deal at all
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  #56  
Old 11-10-2018, 07:26 AM
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"Boys" in itself is not a big deal, but for some people it seems (not necessarily on these forums) that time stopped in 1997 with the death of Diana. If "Boys" is used in that context i reagularly feel that people want to freeze time...

just my 2cts ofcourse
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  #57  
Old 11-10-2018, 07:43 AM
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Of couse it is not a big deal.... Most women refer to "going out with the girls" or girlfirends… or men refer to a night out with the boys... Its not a big deal at all
Exactly. You really need to see the context in which something is said in order to determine whether a statement is demeaning, etc. In French, it’s considered rude to call a waiter “garçon”, which means “boy” - because of course that waiter is not a boy, but a man. If people referred to William and Harry as boys in the sense that they aren’t adults, and talked about them as if they were babies, then I agree that would be wrong. I’ve never seen anything like that here, though (I know I haven’t posted much, but I mostly browse).

Lee-Z, I agree...but like you said, that’s not been a problem here.
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  #58  
Old 11-10-2018, 07:46 AM
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And here I thought it was just me and used the wrong terminology. Then again, my eldest "boy" is a grandfather. What do I know?
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  #59  
Old 11-10-2018, 08:44 AM
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For Charles, William and Harry will always be his dearest boys, even when he will be in his father's current age and they both over sixty.

Wow, congratualtions, Osipi! Not everyone is so lucky to meet their great-grandchild!
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  #60  
Old 11-10-2018, 08:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Betsypaige View Post
Exactly. You really need to see the context in which something is said in order to determine whether a statement is demeaning, etc. In French, it’s considered rude to call a waiter “garçon”, which means “boy” - because of course that waiter is not a boy, but a man. If people referred to William and Harry as boys in the sense that they aren’t adults, and talked about them as if they were babies, then I agree that would be wrong. I’ve never seen anything like that here, though (I know I haven’t posted much, but I mostly browse).

Lee-Z, I agree...but like you said, that’s not been a problem here.
Who is going to talk of them as if they were babies??????/
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