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  #261  
Old 06-20-2012, 03:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Muhler View Post
I may.

Christian started in preschool/børnehaveklasse/0. grade at the age of five, because he was considered mature enough. Felix on the other hand wasn't considered mature enough, so it was advised that he waited one more year.
As a thumbrule children in DK start in preschool at the age of six and first grade at the age of seven.

My own children started in preschool shortly after and just prior to turning six.
I was an "old" six year old when I started in preschool myself, many, many years ago.
Back then we were attached to the school for two hours a day, but it was still mostly play with a few tasks here and there, partly because back then a considerable number of mothers were homemakers and many of us had never been to a kindergarten.
My own children were taught basic arithmetics and reading and writing in kindergarten. Something I was only taught when I started in first grade.

Nowadays children graduate from school after ninth grade, for a total of ten years in school. Some go to "efterskole" = continuation school for a year afterwards. That is usually a boarding school. Others start in high school - and others get an apprentticeship or attend a more practical school.
In my time (the 70's and 80's) it was very common to graduate after tenth grade, for a total of eleven years at school.

As a curiosum, my children roll their eyes way back in their heads when I tell that we were required to stand behind our chairs at the end of the day in kindergarten and sing the going-home-song. After which we bowed or curtsied to our teacher whom we addressed with last name and Mrs/Miss.
Later on some of our teachers would sometimes slap us if we misbehaved or pull our hair.
No calculators, no computers and the teachers only had blackboards! It's pure Oliver Twist to them.
Sounds similar here, even down to the odd slap (I went to school in the 70's and 80's too, 13 years of school, kindergarten through 12th grade, all blackboards, and later... TYPEWRITERS!! ).

Do you not still call teachers by their last names???? In the U.S. it's a must. You can tell your kids that kids in the U.S. must still stand up at the first bell, place hands over hearts, face the flag and recite the pledge of allegiance.
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  #262  
Old 06-20-2012, 04:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Princess Peach View Post
Sounds similar here, even down to the odd slap (I went to school in the 70's and 80's too, 13 years of school, kindergarten through 12th grade, all blackboards, and later... TYPEWRITERS!! ).

Do you not still call teachers by their last names???? In the U.S. it's a must. You can tell your kids that kids in the U.S. must still stand up at the first bell, place hands over hearts, face the flag and recite the pledge of allegiance.
And carbon paper and correction fluid. Something utterly incomprehensible to our children nowadays.

Yes, children call their children by first name now and use informal you as a matter of course.
That began in my time, when the 68'ers entered the schools as teachers. But the old teachers were still addressed with last name and Mr/Mrs. to the day we left. It simply felt natural.
Some DK schools back then and now start the day with a song, but that's about it. I don't know if they do at Christian's school.
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  #263  
Old 06-20-2012, 10:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Muhler View Post
And carbon paper and correction fluid. Something utterly incomprehensible to our children nowadays.

Yes, children call their children by first name now and use informal you as a matter of course.
That began in my time, when the 68'ers entered the schools as teachers. But the old teachers were still addressed with last name and Mr/Mrs. to the day we left. It simply felt natural.
Some DK schools back then and now start the day with a song, but that's about it. I don't know if they do at Christian's school.
The correction fluid is utterly incomprehensible to me now too.

I think we can make a list of things that the future King of Denmark will never come across in his life - I'll start:

A record player/ turn table
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  #264  
Old 06-21-2012, 02:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Princess Peach View Post
Sounds similar here, even down to the odd slap (I went to school in the 70's and 80's too, 13 years of school, kindergarten through 12th grade, all blackboards, and later... TYPEWRITERS!! ).

Do you not still call teachers by their last names???? In the U.S. it's a must. You can tell your kids that kids in the U.S. must still stand up at the first bell, place hands over hearts, face the flag and recite the pledge of allegiance.
It's interesting, because now I see more and more Ms. +First Name for younger grades here in New York City. I know that many classes/schools for kids with special needs only ask the students to call the teacher by his/her first name with a Mr./Ms. in front of it. I don't mind being called 'Ms. Daria', because my last name is not easy to pronounce, but I remember that when I went to school, I had to call all teachers by their last name with Mr./Mrs./Ms. in front of it. So much is becoming informal when it comes to the classroom. I was told that when I work with pre-schoolers, they can will just call me 'Daria'. I'm not sure how I feel about that. I don't want them to think that a teacher is there to just to play with them, and I'd like order in my classroom. I guess we'll see as I get the hang of things. I do think I'll ask them to call me 'Ms. Daria', so that they get used to being a bit formal with adults when it a school setting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Muhler View Post
I may.

Christian started in preschool/børnehaveklasse/0. grade at the age of five, because he was considered mature enough. Felix on the other hand wasn't considered mature enough, so it was advised that he waited one more year.
As a thumbrule children in DK start in preschool at the age of six and first grade at the age of seven.

My own children started in preschool shortly after and just prior to turning six.
I was an "old" six year old when I started in preschool myself, many, many years ago.
Back then we were attached to the school for two hours a day, but it was still mostly play with a few tasks here and there, partly because back then a considerable number of mothers were homemakers and many of us had never been to a kindergarten.
My own children were taught basic arithmetics and reading and writing in kindergarten. Something I was only taught when I started in first grade.

Nowadays children graduate from school after ninth grade, for a total of ten years in school. Some go to "efterskole" = continuation school for a year afterwards. That is usually a boarding school. Others start in high school - and others get an apprentticeship or attend a more practical school.
In my time (the 70's and 80's) it was very common to graduate after tenth grade, for a total of eleven years at school.

As a curiosum, my children roll their eyes way back in their heads when I tell that we were required to stand behind our chairs at the end of the day in kindergarten and sing the going-home-song. After which we bowed or curtsied to our teacher whom we addressed with last name and Mrs/Miss.
Later on some of our teachers would sometimes slap us if we misbehaved or pull our hair.
No calculators, no computers and the teachers only had blackboards! It's pure Oliver Twist to them.
So much of your school experience is like what I would have had if my family didn't come to the States from USSR. I started school at the age of seven (grade one), and would have had to stay in school until age thirteen (grade eight), with option to go on to high school, or technical school. I went to a special school for kids with visual impairment, so our curriculum was stretched out (for instance, what was learned in grade one by typically developing kids was given us over two years) and we had twelve years of school altogether (if we chose to stay through high school) instead of typical ten. I think over ten years ago, Russian schools changed from ten years (with high school) to twelve, and now kids have the option of graduating at eighteen instead of previous sixteen. We had to stand up at the beginning of each lesson when our teacher entered a room, and at the end of each lesson as well. When we were called upon, we had to stand as well. It was very formal and intimidating, but it kept us all in line (no one dared to actually try and be funny, because the tongue-lashing from the teacher was not worth the giggles of the classmates). Now when I look back on my first years of schooling, I realize that there was little to no student engagement. We were expected to sit still, and listen and do the tasks that were given. I know I was in for a huge culture shock when I came to the States and started going to school. Definitely took me a while to realize that I didn't need to get up every time I wanted to answer a question.
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  #265  
Old 06-21-2012, 09:12 AM
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Here in the South, up until kindergarten, children will call the teacher "Mr. first name" or "Miss first name". At the kindergarten level then it is the last name. Among the more traditional southerners, children also address all elders as "ma'am" and "sir" including the classroom (sometimes my kids will say this to us so I know they do it at school at times, depending on the teacher). I'm not surprised that it is going to just first name in New York, as I am from there, and know what it's like. I don't think it's a good idea. I have friends who are teachers in NYC and they have little enough control in their classrooms without the added idea that the teacher is an equal. Children also want to know that someone is in charge as well.

I have a son with mild special needs, and he had to go by this too in his special needs classrooms, but I would not be surprised if children in the more "severe" classrooms call the teacher by first name, as it is just easier for them.

I suppose that Christian is not addressing his teachers as "ma'am" and "sir". There's also a lot more male teachers at the elementary level down here. It that the same as Denmark?

Also, I noticed Christian is in a public school, which I think is admirable. But I don't believe it is the neighborhood school. In the U.S you generally are only allowed to go to the school in your zone, unless there is a program the child needs in a different public school. Is he in the different school due to security concerns? I suppose this is not so much an issue in Denmark. It is a big issues here, comparing it to the children of the President.
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  #266  
Old 06-21-2012, 10:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Princess Peach View Post
I suppose that Christian is not addressing his teachers as "ma'am" and "sir". There's also a lot more male teachers at the elementary level down here. It that the same as Denmark?
He isn't. That I can say with 99.99% certainty.
The majority of school teachers in DK are now women.
That is even more so at nursery and kindergarten level. So much so that men are sought after.
It is very much debated whether the boys are being affected. In the sense that boys are often more active, while the school system is now being too much directed against girls. In the sense that the stereotypical girl pupil sit still and listen and is able to being left alone to study.
Well, I personally would like to see a more balanced approach in regards to teaching, because as I see it, the active children are at an disadvantage as it is now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Princess Peach View Post
Also, I noticed Christian is in a public school, which I think is admirable. But I don't believe it is the neighborhood school. In the U.S you generally are only allowed to go to the school in your zone, unless there is a program the child needs in a different public school. Is he in the different school due to security concerns? I suppose this is not so much an issue in Denmark. It is a big issues here, comparing it to the children of the President.
It isn't a local school, but you are free to apply for your child to attend any school within a municipality, provided there is room and depending on certain restrictions. Immigrant parents do not have the same free choice as ethnic Danes, because the authorities want to spread out immigrant children on as many schools as possible.
However, due to savings in public schools, many if not most parents who can afford it send their children to private schools.
Alternatively parents do like us. We live in a large village and our children attend the local public school. That school has very few immigrant children and very few children from families with social issues. That means that the vast majority of children have the same middle class background, are very similar in regards to needs, language level, cultural and ethnic background and so on. The diversity is pretty limited.
That again makes it easier to teach a class, which again attracts better teachers and so on, and so on.
In short: If we lived in a city rather than a village, it is almost certain our children would be put in a private school rather than a public school, because the level in public schools in the cities is decidedly lower than in rural public schools and in private schools.
When it comes to the education of our children, I and Mrs. Muhler are very selfish.

That is in stark contrast to the public schools in the 70's and 80's, where more than 90% of all children went to the nearest public school. In the same class it would be normal to find children from parents who were unskilled as well as children from parents who were well educated. There were children from strong families as well as children from families with social issues.
That diversity within a typical class has now become the exception here in DK.

Anyway, back to Christian. It's no secret at all that M&F looked at several schools within the greater Copenhagen area, both public and private. And eventhough Christian normally wouldn't belong to the school he is attending, a loophole in the regulations were used.
Any public school would welcome any DRF child with open arms. Because that means funding. It means prestige, which again attract better applicants among the teachers and children from socially stronger families.
- Not least in a time when the politicians get a lot of heat for advocating public schools while sending their own children to private schools.

The school Christian is attending is among the best public schools in DK. The pupils mainly come from middle class families and up. A lot of the children are from families who frequent the same social circle as M&F themselves, so it's hardly a surprise that M&F chose this school.
But, and that is important, Christian will inevitably get to know children from families who are below the social layer M&F frequent and also from different social circles.
Much more so than if he had attended the private Krebs School where Nikolai and Felix go.

Bette Henrik is the one among the DRF children who has the most diverse classmates, when he is attending the kindergarten in Møgeltønder that is.
It will be interesting to see whether Joachim and our Marie will send him to a public school in the nearby town of Tønder or to a private school. I believe it is almost certain he will go to school in Southern Jutland.
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  #267  
Old 06-21-2012, 11:53 AM
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Virtually the same issues with schools, here, Muhler. My children attend public school because we are in a very good suburban area. There is diversity here, which I think is essential in a United States school, but our immigrant population are very hard working, and set a great work ethic at the school. Also, there are very few issues in these schools. Anyone who moves into this area and pays these house prices and rents have a good work ethic which is instilled in the children. You need not apologize about being selfish about education. We are too.

If we lived in the area I grew up in, they would be literally catapulted into a private school via giant slingshot.

As for Christian, it sounds like he is in a wonderful setting, and is getting the best of both worlds; a GREAT public school. I think it's great when affluent parents in the spotlight do this. Now I suppose that the school is inundated with applications!! I also suppose that he does not ride the big yellow school bus you see all over the roads here. Do they have "school busses" there, or are children expected to make their own way?

As for Henrik and his sister, it will be interesting to see where he goes.
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  #268  
Old 06-21-2012, 12:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Princess Peach View Post
I also suppose that he does not ride the big yellow school bus you see all over the roads here. Do they have "school busses" there, or are children expected to make their own way?
No, he doesn't. (Nor is Isabella for that matter). Christian is either driven to school by one of his parents with a PET escort trailing behind or in one car with a nanny and with his PET officers too. (He may even be so comfortable with his "PET-uncles", that a nanny is no longer needed).
There is actually a picture of Frederik taking Bella to kindergarten in a private car during the state visit from China in this weeks issue of Billed Bladet.
While bette Henrik in contrast has been known to be taken to and picked up from kindergarten by his parents on foot. The distance from Amalienborg to Isabella (and bette Henrik's) kindergarten is only a few hundred meters, so I guess it's a security issue.

I think the concept of uniform school buses, like in USA, is nothing short of brilliant!
There are school buses here in DK as well, as well as taxis used to transport school children. Predominantly for public schools.
The taxis are common in the cities, especially for immigrant children, who are spread out, so that they may attend a school in a different part of the city.
In rural areas school buses are very common. - But they are not uniform like in USA.

Children attending private schools are, with a few exceptions, expected to get to school either by public transport or by being driven by someone.

- In this context I think it's worth to single out an initiative in UK, where parents and volunteers escort groups of younger pupils to and from school on foot. Even if the distance is farly short.
An excellent thing that provides safety on so many levels.
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  #269  
Old 06-21-2012, 04:01 PM
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[QUOTE
- In this context I think it's worth to single out an initiative in UK, where parents and volunteers escort groups of younger pupils to and from school on foot. Even if the distance is farly short.
An excellent thing that provides safety on so many levels.[/QUOTE]

I agree completely I get crazy when I see so many really joung kids around 6 or 7 years old walking to the schools alone! I know some parents don't have a choice but certenly it is not safe at all here in the US to leave such a young kids walking by themselves. sometimes is is not even safe to walk inside the shcool alone!
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  #270  
Old 06-22-2012, 09:31 PM
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I can tell you here in our district Massachusetts the children are required to call the teachers by Mr./Mrs./Miss last name. In high school, some of the coaches or drama teachers become friendly and allow the kids to use first names but it is very uncommon.
One of our sons did a college year in London with a mix of US students, one of whom was from the South. He habitually said "sir or M'am" as his up bringing taught. One of the profs thought he was putting on an act and was really angry about it! Just shows you how trying to be polite in one setting can backfire in another...
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  #271  
Old 06-23-2012, 01:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Frelinghighness View Post
I can tell you here in our district Massachusetts the children are required to call the teachers by Mr./Mrs./Miss last name. In high school, some of the coaches or drama teachers become friendly and allow the kids to use first names but it is very uncommon.
One of our sons did a college year in London with a mix of US students, one of whom was from the South. He habitually said "sir or M'am" as his up bringing taught. One of the profs thought he was putting on an act and was really angry about it! Just shows you how trying to be polite in one setting can backfire in another...

Absolutely.
I remember a story some years ago, where a Dane attended a university in USA. And out of habit he addressed his professor without using the title, something that hadn't been used in DK since the late 60's elerly 70's.
The professor was insulted.

A learning process for both parties.
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  #272  
Old 06-23-2012, 03:39 PM
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Absolutely.
I remember a story some years ago, where a Dane attended a university in USA. And out of habit he addressed his professor without using the title, something that hadn't been used in DK since the late 60's elerly 70's.
The professor was insulted.

A learning process for both parties.
That's interesting, because when I was working on my undergrad and then on my Masters, my professors were constantly encouraging me to call them by their first names, because they felt that we were all adults and there was no reason to stand on ceremony. I was brought up to show respect to those who are older (even now that I'm an adult, I will still address someone who is older than I am in a formal fashion, especially in university/employment setting), as well as those who were in the academia, so it was very hard to just switch over. After a while, my professors gave up and just accepted the fact that I was a very old-fashioned and individual.
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  #273  
Old 08-07-2012, 01:57 PM
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New photos of Vincent and Josephine
It's Mary herself who has take the pictures.


Josephine: http://kongehuset.dk/materialemappe/...ephine.jpg.img

Vincent: http://kongehuset.dk/materialemappe/...ncent2.jpg.img
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  #274  
Old 08-07-2012, 02:03 PM
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OMG! They are bot adorable!
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  #275  
Old 08-07-2012, 02:04 PM
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Aren't they cute little things! Thanks for posting them. Josephine is changing. When she was younger I didn't think she looked at all like her siblings - thought she was perhaps more of a Donaldson. Now I am changing my mind.
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  #276  
Old 08-07-2012, 02:11 PM
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nice pics of the two! mary is becoming a good photographer.
they look so happy and active!

I see on the DRF website that Christian and Isabella also have new pics
H.K.H. Prins Christian - Kongehuset

H.K.H. Prinsesse Isabella - Kongehuset
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  #277  
Old 08-07-2012, 02:46 PM
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i love the pics of all 4 of them, Mary took a very nice shoots, shes becoming a pro but what i love the most is that its actually her who takes the pictures, because it makes them more sentimental and familiar^^

little Josephine is really pretty and cute, im glad im seeing her now, because i missed her at the annual summer photoshoot!
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  #278  
Old 08-07-2012, 03:07 PM
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Originally Posted by kathia_sophia View Post
i love the pics of all 4 of them, Mary took a very nice shoots, shes becoming a pro but what i love the most is that its actually her who takes the pictures, because it makes them more sentimental and familiar^^

little Josephine is really pretty and cute, im glad im seeing her now, because i missed her at the annual summer photoshoot!
Well, those are nice pictures, but nothing close to a pro. Anyone can take pictures like that
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  #279  
Old 08-07-2012, 07:06 PM
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They are so cute !!! Especially Vincent.
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  #280  
Old 08-07-2012, 07:44 PM
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What lovely photos, I think the similarity between the twins is really beginning to show now, those little things are so incredibly cute and their cheeks are (still) very pinchable. Christian and Isabella are also very beautiful children, it's fun how Christian is resembling his mother very much and Bella is a female replica of Frederik. Also, Mary is a quite skilled photographer - she should also take Frederik's photo

- Christian
- Isabella
- Vincent
- Josephine
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