The Royal Forums Coat of Arms

Go Back   The Royal Forums > Reigning Houses > Royal Family of Spain

Join The Royal Forums Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
  #1001  
Old 10-01-2015, 09:16 PM
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Reading, United Kingdom
Posts: 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duke of Marmalade View Post
Anti-monarchy protesters have taken to the streets of the Spanish capital, Madrid, amid growing calls for a referendum to abolish the system. The rally comes as pro-independence parties in the Spanish region of Catalonia claimed victory in regional parliamentary elections.

PressTV-Spaniards hold anti-monarchy protest
Catalonia elections set separatists on collision course - CNN.com
Huge anti-monarchy demo held in Spain

1) Not that many people in these protests anyway.
2) It's the Podemos people, who are trying to use the turbulence of the news from the regional elections in Catalonia to push their own agenda of 'regime-change' and 'state transformation'.. I don't think they have even a relative majority of Spaniards on their side; in any case national elections are around the corned and it will all show there.
3) Monarchists shouldn't worry that easily; it takes more than that to change an established regime. The Bourbons remain popular in most of the country, and most people realize that the level and quality of life that Spain has had for over a generation would not have been the same without them.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #1002  
Old 10-01-2015, 09:29 PM
Al_bina's Avatar
Majesty
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: City, Kazakhstan
Posts: 7,032
I am surprised to see articles about the anti-monarchy demonstrations. Based on the posts in this thread, I thought that King Felipe and his spouse won the support.
__________________

__________________
"I never did mind about the little things"
Amanda, "Point of No Return"
Reply With Quote
  #1003  
Old 10-01-2015, 10:14 PM
Gentry
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Lisboa, Portugal
Posts: 75
think the Spanish monarchy is not in danger. King Philip VI and Queen Letizia are very popular, such as the monarchy.
Reply With Quote
  #1004  
Old 10-01-2015, 10:31 PM
Lady Nimue's Avatar
Heir Presumptive
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Pacific Palisades, United States
Posts: 2,094
Quote:
Originally Posted by Al_bina View Post
I am surprised to see articles about the anti-monarchy demonstrations. Based on the posts in this thread, I thought that King Felipe and his spouse won the support.
I share the sense of confusion.

News analysis I have read outside the Royal Forum seems to see an end to the monarchy at some point. I have no idea what is the case, I just know what I have read over my morning coffee. Saw this thread, haven't read it in full, just the last few posts.
__________________
Russian National Anthem: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bGoNaLjQrV8
O Magnum Mysterium: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dWU7dyey6yo
Reply With Quote
  #1005  
Old 10-02-2015, 09:41 AM
Nobility
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Lalala, Spain
Posts: 312
In every country in the world there are people who want to overthrow the political system, be it republicans in monarchies, anarchists, libertarians...Those photos show a dozen people at most and haven't made any news in Spain, they present no threat to the monarchy, that's why statistics (from trustworthy and respected sources) exist, because an anecdotal 12 people don't represent the country, and in free societies people are able to protest and demonstrate against the status quo. I can assure you that republican organizations hold rallies and meetings in every European monarchy.
Reply With Quote
  #1006  
Old 10-02-2015, 10:54 AM
Blog Real's Avatar
Royal Highness
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Lisboa, Portugal
Posts: 1,531
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnaC View Post
In every country in the world there are people who want to overthrow the political system, be it republicans in monarchies, anarchists, libertarians...Those photos show a dozen people at most and haven't made any news in Spain, they present no threat to the monarchy, that's why statistics (from trustworthy and respected sources) exist, because an anecdotal 12 people don't represent the country, and in free societies people are able to protest and demonstrate against the status quo. I can assure you that republican organizations hold rallies and meetings in every European monarchy.
Thanks for the comment. I am portgus and wish everything goes for the best of the monarchy in Spain.
__________________
Acclamation Manuel II of Portugal: 6 May 1908
Reply With Quote
  #1007  
Old 10-02-2015, 08:00 PM
Serene Highness
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: many places, United States
Posts: 1,321
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnaC View Post
In every country in the world there are people who want to overthrow the political system, be it republicans in monarchies, anarchists, libertarians...Those photos show a dozen people at most and haven't made any news in Spain, they present no threat to the monarchy, that's why statistics (from trustworthy and respected sources) exist, because an anecdotal 12 people don't represent the country, and in free societies people are able to protest and demonstrate against the status quo. I can assure you that republican organizations hold rallies and meetings in every European monarchy.
Thank you for your opinions. Plus, since you are actually from Spain, I believe you have a proper handle on the current situation. Would take your viewpoint over medias agenda any day.
__________________
Forgiveness is the fragrance the violet shed on the heel that crushed it - Mark Twain
Reply With Quote
  #1008  
Old 12-21-2015, 07:46 AM
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Reading, United Kingdom
Posts: 108
Can someone explain to the rest who don't know much about Spanish politics what do the results of yesterday's election mean for the new royal couple and its prospects?
Reply With Quote
  #1009  
Old 12-21-2015, 07:59 AM
Duke of Marmalade's Avatar
Imperial Majesty
TRF Author
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Frankfurt am Main, Germany
Posts: 11,557
None of the parties have on their agenda to abolish the SRF. For the first time post-Franco, the 2 party system has been cracked.
It will be difficult though to form a working government, and Felipe will have an important role as kind of mediator to help:
King Felipe will now play a key role in negotiations to vote in a prime minister
There will be new elections if a leader is not found two months after first round of voting

Spanish election 2015: What happens now if there’s no majority to form a government? | In English | EL PAÍS
Reply With Quote
  #1010  
Old 12-21-2015, 08:39 PM
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Reading, United Kingdom
Posts: 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duke of Marmalade View Post
None of the parties have on their agenda to abolish the SRF.

Not even the Podemos..? I thought they were behind the rallies against the monarchy when Juan Carlos resigned.. I have heard members of that party talking about the monarchy with least favorable words -at least until some time ago.. Has that changed/been mitigated at all..?
Reply With Quote
  #1011  
Old 12-21-2015, 08:55 PM
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Martinsburg, United States
Posts: 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duke of Marmalade View Post
None of the parties have on their agenda to abolish the SRF. For the first time post-Franco, the 2 party system has been cracked.
It will be difficult though to form a working government, and Felipe will have an important role as kind of mediator to help:
King Felipe will now play a key role in negotiations to vote in a prime minister
There will be new elections if a leader is not found two months after first round of voting

Spanish election 2015: What happens now if there’s no majority to form a government? | In English | EL PAÍS
I will admit that I know nothing about Spanish politics so please forgive my ignorance, what caught my eye in your comment was what I highlighted above. How many political parties are there in Spain and if there was only 2 before, how were they cracked? And how many political parties are there now? And how if there are more then 2 parties, how were the other parties formed and how were they put on the ballot? This is really interesting to me.

You mentioned that if no leader is found in 2 months, there will be another election........who does the voting in that election, the people or just the members of the political parties and how many candidates run, one from each party or more? Thank you!
Reply With Quote
  #1012  
Old 12-22-2015, 02:26 AM
Duke of Marmalade's Avatar
Imperial Majesty
TRF Author
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Frankfurt am Main, Germany
Posts: 11,557
Maybe in the long run Podemos would plan a referendum on the monarchy but right now this is the very last thing on people's minds and agendas. Felipe hasn't put a foot wrong, he has an important role to play now, the situation is not easy and people are looking to him to fill out his role as mediator but of course it is limited and he has to stay impartial.
There is a danger that Spain will become 'ungovernable' and will go into very unstable times. Since Franco Spain has been ruled by 2 parties only, PP and PSOE, only since the crisis people were looking for alternatives. Podemos for example was only founded in March 2014.
PP with Rajoy got most votes so he wants to be in the lead to form a government but the other parties will try to block this. A great coalition seems out of question.
Some more info here:
Spanish general election 2015: As it happened | In English | EL PAÍS
Spain edging towards Socialist-led coalition as negotiations begin | World news | The Guardian
Reply With Quote
  #1013  
Old 12-22-2015, 03:55 AM
Marengo's Avatar
Administrator
Royal Blogger, TRF Author
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Posts: 17,636
I suppose a minority government where they have to look for alternative alliances to get legislation through is an option.
__________________
TRF Rules and FAQ
Reply With Quote
  #1014  
Old 12-22-2015, 04:24 AM
Duke of Marmalade's Avatar
Imperial Majesty
TRF Author
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Frankfurt am Main, Germany
Posts: 11,557
Minority government is always unstable and the problem with parties like Podemos is that they might have good intentions or be idealistic, they have no experience in government. Governing is a reality check with regards to what they have promised their voters / what they stand for and what is possible in the end / what concessions they have to make to form a coalition. EG in Germany we've had minority government only on federal state level and it never lasted long. Rajoy's party got the most votes so I can anticipate his will to head a future government even though people voted for change in general.
Reply With Quote
  #1015  
Old 12-22-2015, 05:44 AM
lula's Avatar
Imperial Majesty
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: , Spain
Posts: 18,194
Or Rajoy minority or new elections. Or something that is extremely complicated PP-PSOE agreement.

PSOE and Podemos could agree, but need support from nationalists ... and the situation of Catalonia is very complicated and it could significantly harm the PSOE in the rest of Spain (some leaders in different regions such as Andalucia and Extremadura where the PSOE gets many votes are against). Podemos also wants constitutional changes, that are impossible to do without the PP. The main electoral enemy of the PSOE is Podemos, because it takes their votes, and that in new elections could harm them.

The PP has obtained more than 1/3 of the Parliament, and has absolute majority of the Senate. The Constitution can not be changed without them and they can extend much the processing of any law with which they may not agree. In that situation a government without the PP will be extremely difficult.
Reply With Quote
  #1016  
Old 12-22-2015, 04:51 PM
Blog Real's Avatar
Royal Highness
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Lisboa, Portugal
Posts: 1,531
Quote:
Originally Posted by lula View Post
Or Rajoy minority or new elections. Or something that is extremely complicated PP-PSOE agreement.

PSOE and Podemos could agree, but need support from nationalists ... and the situation of Catalonia is very complicated and it could significantly harm the PSOE in the rest of Spain (some leaders in different regions such as Andalucia and Extremadura where the PSOE gets many votes are against). Podemos also wants constitutional changes, that are impossible to do without the PP. The main electoral enemy of the PSOE is Podemos, because it takes their votes, and that in new elections could harm them.

The PP has obtained more than 1/3 of the Parliament, and has absolute majority of the Senate. The Constitution can not be changed without them and they can extend much the processing of any law with which they may not agree. In that situation a government without the PP will be extremely difficult.
To my knowledge no party during the election campaign spoke to abolish the monarchy.
I think the monarchy is secure in Spain.
As is the popularity of the monarchy at this time?
__________________
Acclamation Manuel II of Portugal: 6 May 1908
Reply With Quote
  #1017  
Old 12-22-2015, 08:53 PM
Royal Highness
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Pittsburgh, United States
Posts: 1,785
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowBirds View Post
I will admit that I know nothing about Spanish politics so please forgive my ignorance, what caught my eye in your comment was what I highlighted above. How many political parties are there in Spain and if there was only 2 before, how were they cracked? And how many political parties are there now? And how if there are more then 2 parties, how were the other parties formed and how were they put on the ballot? This is really interesting to me.

You mentioned that if no leader is found in 2 months, there will be another election........who does the voting in that election, the people or just the members of the political parties and how many candidates run, one from each party or more? Thank you!
Spain, like other European monarchies, has a parliamentary system of government. In a parliamentary system, the head of government, i e the prime minister, is not directly elected by the people. Iinstead, voters elect members of parliament, i e the legislature. If a party wins an absolute majority of seats in parliament, the leader of that party in practice becomes automatically the new prime minister. If however no single party has alone an absolute majority of seats, different parties have to team up to form a coalition government. In that case, the Leader of the largest party within the coalition (i e the party with the most seats) usually becomes the PM, but that is not always so.

The mechanusm to choose a new PM and form a government actually varies from country to country. In some countries, the head of state, i e the King or Queen in a monarchy or the president in a republic, nominates a new PM after consulting the party leaders. The appointed PM then forms a government and submits a government program for a vote of confidence in the parliament. In other countries, rather than voting on a government program, the parliament votes directly to confirm or not the PM's appointment. Finally, there are countries where the parliament first elects by majority vote a new PM and the person who is elected is then appointed PM by the Head of State.

In any of the situations mentioned in the previous paragraph, if parliament is unable to elect a PM by majority vote or, by a majority, votes down a nominated PM or his/her government program, then parliament can be dissolved and new elections are called for all seats in the legislature.

PS: In some countries, the legislature actually consists of two separate houses (like the HOuse of Representatives and the Senate in the US). In those cases, the government usually needs majority support only in the most numerous House (which, nowadays, is always elected by popular vote) and the dissolution of one House may not affect the mandate of the other.
Reply With Quote
  #1018  
Old 12-23-2015, 02:10 AM
Duke of Marmalade's Avatar
Imperial Majesty
TRF Author
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Frankfurt am Main, Germany
Posts: 11,557
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blog Real View Post
To my knowledge no party during the election campaign spoke to abolish the monarchy.
I think the monarchy is secure in Spain.
As is the popularity of the monarchy at this time?
You are correct. There are more pressing issues that abolishing the monarchy. If all those got settled and the new parties more established, a referendum could be on the cards, years from now.

Quote:
lula The PP has obtained more than 1/3 of the Parliament, and has absolute majority of the Senate. The Constitution can not be changed without them and they can extend much the processing of any law with which they may not agree. In that situation a government without the PP will be extremely difficult.
a solution could be to sacrifice Rajoy as leader and possible PM, if he makes it too difficult for the other leaders to deal with PP.
http://europe.newsweek.com/spain-scr...s-408063?rm=eu

Felipe has time until January 13 to meet everybody and work out possible solutions.
Reply With Quote
  #1019  
Old 12-23-2015, 02:45 AM
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Martinsburg, United States
Posts: 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mbruno View Post
Spain, like other European monarchies, has a parliamentary system of government. In a parliamentary system, the head of government, i e the prime minister, is not directly elected by the people. Iinstead, voters elect members of parliament, i e the legislature. If a party wins an absolute majority of seats in parliament, the leader of that party in practice becomes automatically the new prime minister. If however no single party has alone an absolute majority of seats, different parties have to team up to form a coalition government. In that case, the Leader of the largest party within the coalition (i e the party with the most seats) usually becomes the PM, but that is not always so.

The mechanusm to choose a new PM and form a government actually varies from country to country. In some countries, the head of state, i e the King or Queen in a monarchy or the president in a republic, nominates a new PM after consulting the party leaders. The appointed PM then forms a government and submits a government program for a vote of confidence in the parliament. In other countries, rather than voting on a government program, the parliament votes directly to confirm or not the PM's appointment. Finally, there are countries where the parliament first elects by majority vote a new PM and the person who is elected is then appointed PM by the Head of State.

In any of the situations mentioned in the previous paragraph, if parliament is unable to elect a PM by majority vote or, by a majority, votes down a nominated PM or his/her government program, then parliament can be dissolved and new elections are called for all seats in the legislature.

PS: In some countries, the legislature actually consists of two separate houses (like the HOuse of Representatives and the Senate in the US). In those cases, the government usually needs majority support only in the most numerous House (which, nowadays, is always elected by popular vote) and the dissolution of one House may not affect the mandate of the other.
Thank you, yet the words in bold is what has me confused, A party, what I don't know is: how many political parties are there in say Spain? Here in the US we have 2 only(sad) so are there more then 2 and if so, do they have names? Can anyone group of people just form a political party and if so, how does the political party(the parties) get on ballots so that their candidates can have the chance to be elected to parliament.

What sometime is hard to understand is that people talk about a person in the party and yet I get the impression that is the name of the party, the person's name, doesn't the party as a whole have a name and would they be either a republican, democrat, independent or monarch?

Here we have 2 parties, republicans or democrats and nothing else but there should be more then 2. Is that they way it is for the parliaments of Europe, only 2 parties, republicans and democrats?

I am find this very interesting as with what is going on here, it shows that there is a huge need for more then 2 parties and wonder how many parties are in a country in, say Spain? If there are 3 or more, then how do they get together to hold elections all the time, must the current PM put that to a vote within the present parliament or can he just state that on such and such a date there is going to be an election for what ever reason?

I do understand now that the people elect the parliament being all the parties that are running for office and that the majority party gets to put their PM in office and then form a government, yet the only confusing part for me is The Parties, just how many parties can there be running at one time, do they campaign around the country like here in the US? I have never really taken an interest in political elections before but what is going on in Spain and here has sparked an interest. So I am a novice in this and all your information is very helpful, Thank you for taking the time to answer my questions.

I know my questions must sound silly but they are coming from someone who knows almost nothing about politics so this is a learning process for me about European government and how they are formed.
Reply With Quote
  #1020  
Old 12-23-2015, 03:53 AM
Duke of Marmalade's Avatar
Imperial Majesty
TRF Author
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Frankfurt am Main, Germany
Posts: 11,557
SnowBirds,

the answer is not easy, for example the European Union consists of 28 countries and all of them are different due to their historical background. Some of them have 2 parties only, some of them are more or less democratic and tend to rule with absolute majorities, most of them have more parties because when people get unhappy they tend to elect smaller parties (what is the case in Spain now - due to the financial crisis) that usually form a coalition with one of the bigger parties. For example in Germany we have 2 big established parties but one rarely gets absolute majority so most of the time there are coalitions with a third party (liberal/right-ish, left-ish, green) or with each other. The smaller parties have to make 5% of the votes to get seats in parliament and if the coalition building is successful, the government will usually last 5 or 6 years before the next election turnus. If it collapses, new elections will be on the cards sooner.

Like in Spain, the parties usually campaign around the country but the process by far not as long as in the US, where the campaign goes on for almost 18 months. I think in Germany its 6 months and people like it as short as possible, its more quick and easy, regarding the choice of candidates too.

In Spain, there are now the established parties PP (conservative, with president Rajoy who keeps majority despite losses) and PSOE (socialist, and unlike in Germany these two parties do not have a relationship that would allow a coalition). Due to the crisis a lot of people turned to the left-ish Podemos and liberal/right-ish Ciudadanos, so there are 4 parties now instead of 2 to form a government.
Rajoy will be in charge of forming the government first because his party got most votes and he is president, but that could change quickly if he doesnt find a stable solution of coalition with (some of) the other parties. Felipe will have talks with all of them to see where they stand.

Hope this helps to answer your questions.
__________________

Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
catalonia, future of the monarchy, juan carlist, juan carlos i, royalist, spain, spanish nobility, spanish royal family


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Future of the Belgian monarchy Marengo Royal Family of Belgium 110 11-19-2016 07:57 PM
The Future of the Danish Monarchy Empress Royal House of Denmark 624 11-17-2016 08:58 AM
Future of the Dutch Monarchy Marengo Dutch Royals 3 12-10-2014 02:16 PM
Marriage Between Two Heirs? BritishRoyalist General Royal Discussion 41 07-30-2014 10:23 AM




Popular Tags
ascot 2016 best gown best gown september 2016 best hat best outfit birthday birthday wishes catherine middleton style coup d'etat crown prince haakon crown princess mary crown princess mary fashion crown princess mette-marit current events duchess of cambridge e-mail fashion poll grand duke jean greece kate middleton king abdullah ii king felipe king felipe vi king willem-alexander member introduction monarchy new zealand nobel gala norway november 2016 october 2016 opening of parliament picture of the week president nieto; state visit prince alexander of sweden prince bernhard prince charles prince joachim princess madeleine princess marie princess mary princess mary daytime fashion princess mary fashion princess mary hats queen letizia queen letizia casual outfits queen letizia daytime fashion queen letizia fashion queen letizia style queen mathilde queen mathildes outfits queen maxima queen maxima casual wear queen maxima daytime fashion queen maxima fashion queen maxima hats queen maxima style queen rania royal fashion september 2016 sonja state visit state visit to denmark succession sweden the duchess of cambridge the duchess of cambridge casual wear the duchess of cambridge daytime fashion the duchess of cambridge fashion the duchess of cambridge hats


Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:22 PM.

Social Knowledge Networks

eXTReMe Tracker
Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2016
Jelsoft Enterprises