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  #21  
Old 08-01-2005, 08:37 AM
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Pendant studded with emeralds and stones






Necklace with gold pleated chain







Golden footwear






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Old 08-01-2005, 10:20 AM
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The Royal Collection © 2005,
Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II
RCIN 48482


Bird of paradise (huma) from Tipu Sultan’s throne

c.1787-91; stand 1815

Indian Mysore, and Paul Storr (stand)

Presented to George III



The Royal Collection © 2005,
Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II
RCIN 11357


Pair of bracelets (kadas), nineteenth century

Nineteenth century

Indian (?Jaipur)

Presented to Queen Victoria



The Royal Collection © 2005,
Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II
RCIN 11358


Regal Crown, c.1875

c.1875

Indian (?Lucknow)

Presented to Edward VII when Prince of Wales by the Taluqdars of Oudh



The Royal Collection © 2005,
Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II
RCIN 11291



The emerald belt of Maharaja Sher Singh, c.1840

c.1840

Indian (Lahore)

Presented to Queen Victoria by the East India Company



http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/eg...ct=11291&row=1
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Old 08-01-2005, 10:28 AM
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The 'Timur Ruby' necklace, 1853

1853

R. & S. Garrard & Co.

The spinels presented to Queen Victoria by the East India Company
http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/eg...t=100017&row=2
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Old 08-01-2005, 10:30 AM
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Exquisite Indian jewellery on display
Dubai |By A Staff Reporter | 31-05-2002
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Col. Saeed bin Bleilah, director of the Dubai Naturalisation and Residency Department, touring the stalls after inaugurating the Great India Jewellery Show. © Gulf News
Some royal collections of diamond sets belonging to the ruling families of former princely states of India, worth Rs25 million are on display and sale at a four-day jewellery exhibition which was inaugurated by Col. Saeed bin Bleilah, director of Dubai Naturalisation and Residency Department at the Hyatt Regency yesterday.

The event, which ends on June 2, has attracted over 20 exhibitors who brought some exquisite creations of Indian jewellery in diamonds, gold, silver, platinum, gems, kundan, meenakari and pearls. Exhibitors participating in the show represent Rajasthan, Chennai, Hyderabad, Bangal-ore, Mumbai, Delhi and Kerala, among others.

"This is a wonderful show with lots of variety in jewellery. It has a mix of modern designs and antique collections which are very attractive," said Bleilah, after a tour of the exhibition.

"This is one of the few shows ever organised which has attracted the finest craftsmen in their field who imprint their vision and finest efforts on precious metals and stones with their magical pair of hands. Even regular buyers will find it difficult to resist the temptation of the price range at this edition," said Syed Zakir Ahmed, organiser of the event.

Nirbhay Kumar Singh and Pushpa Singh, who have the royal collection of over 20 diamond sets and other 30 antique sets among other jewellery at the exhibition have attracted the attention of the visitors.

"We have over 30 years of experience in jewellery design. We have brought over 20 collections that belonged to raja maharajahs and added another 30 antique collections here in Dubai," said Pushpa Singh.
http://www.gulf-news.com/Articles/ne...rticleID=52906
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Old 08-01-2005, 10:33 AM
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Kundan - Jewellery fit for a Queen!
The Royal Maharajas of India and their Ranis lived lives fit for... well, Kings! The art of making Kundan Jewellery found great patronage during the Mughal Era and some of the world's most mersmerising pieces of jewellery were created in those times. India was often called the "Golden Bird" thanks to the availability of the precious metal as well as its mystical usage in the creation of fascinating ornaments.

Kundan Jewellery is one of the oldest forms of jewellery making. It is made and worn in India, specifically around Jaipur and Bikaner, in 24 carat pure gold. Kundan is a method of gem setting, consisting of inserting a gold foil between the stones and its mount.
The purest, softest gold is hammered into very fine sheets and literally mounded around the stones to encase them and hold them in place. Light strikes the precious stones only from above dulling their shine. So, to provide depth and refraction a piece of gold or silver foil is placed under the stone making it glow.

Benefits:
As compared to the Western-style bezel or claw setting, Kundan gives the craftsman the freedom to use irregular shapes and sizes. Thus the time and labour needed to create each setting separately to the size of the stone is saved.
A stone thus needs to be only minimally sized and can retain its original look.
<LI>Additionally, Kundan enables work to be carried out without soldering or applying heat. The Gold or Silver in which the Kundan is embedded is soft enough that the stones can be encased simply by pressing them.

The Process Of Kundan Making

The Enamellings Process itself needs an entire team of specialist to all pool in their various skills. First, the designer selects a design as per the client's requirements and passes it to the goldsmith. The Goldsmith creates the gold stencil and gives it back to the designer who outlines the pattern on the gold surface and burnishes it, to make it stand out.

Now the engraver comes into the picture. His is the job which requires maximum skill and precision. Champleve - is a technique used by the engraver to lower those areas of the metal that will take the enamel by carving them out. These lowered surfaces are hatched with fine parallel lines to enable thorough fusion between colour and metal, to add to the visual delight as the hatchings enchance the play of light over the transparent colours.

The Meenakar or enameller is the next in line. He fills in the enamel colours in the lowered surfaces, thereby evening the surface and fusing it to the gold with repeated firings. Since the enamels are of varying hardness and thus require different temperatures for fusing, they must be fired separately - that from hardest highest temperature to softest lowest temperature. Cooling is as important as heating: a flow at this stage could crack the enamel or render it undesirably opaque.

The usual colour sequence begins with white and runs through blue, green, black and yellow before reaching red, rich ruby the signature colour of Jaipur enamelling. It achieves an unmatched brilliance and clarity. "The purer the gold, the richer the colour," goes an old saying, and the red Meena of Jaipur is applied only to a high karat gold.

Once the enamelling has been completed the surfaces must be polished. The kundan setter then asks the Patua or stringer, to thread the pieces with strings and make them a ready-to-wear stunning piece of art!

Today the finest Kundan jewellery is made in Bikaner & Jaipur, in Rajasthan. The Historical significance associated with this jewellery, that it was once worn by only Kings and Queens, is what makes it so attractive. As those who have it will tell you, Kundan jewellery, like wine only gets better with time.

Despite the trend for fusion and IndoWestern jewellery in our culture, on occasions like Wedding and Festivals, Indian women prefer the traditional and the Royal Ethnic look - Kundan it is!


http://www.shaadi.com/wedding/fashio...ndan-jewel.php

http://www.redhotcurry.com/entertain.../christies.htm
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  #26  
Old 08-01-2005, 10:37 AM
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Indian ex-royals lose battle for gold

By Narayan Bareth
BBC correspondent in Jaipur

One of the wealthiest former royal families in the Indian state of Rajasthan has lost a long-running legal battle over the ownership of nearly 600 kilograms of gold.
A court ruled that the gold, which was seized from a fort belonging to Jaipur's royal family by the federal government nearly 30 years ago, should be handed over to the state.

" The gold... was listed as the private property of Maharaja Man Singh of Jaipur "

According to the state counsel Dr Arjun Singh Khangarot, the gold confiscated from the royal fort was part of a hidden treasure.
Under the Treasure Trove Act, the ownership of any hidden treasure lies with the state government, he said.
But the government's claim was contested by the ex-royals in a legal battle which has continued for 15 years.

Members of the former royal family maintained that the fort was part of the family's private property and no one should have any claim over it.
The lawyer representing them, R P Singh, rejected claims that the gold could be categorised as hidden treasure.
"The gold seized by the federal government was listed as the private property of Maharaja Man Singh of Jaipur during the merger of the princely state with the Union of India," said Mr Singh.

"The confiscation was made under the Gold Control Act, and there is no question of applying the Treasure Trove Act in this case."
The ruling is unlikely to settle the dispute between the government and the royals, as the decision will be challenged by the family in the High Court.

During the Emergency imposed in 1975 by the Congress Party Government headed by the then Prime Minister Indira Gandhi, the authorities carried out raids on Moti Doongri, a privately-owned hilltop fort built like a Scottish castle.
Large quantities of gold were seized by the authorities, most of which was considered illegal as the government said the royal family had not declared its possession to the authorities.
Such raids were alleged to have been targeted at those not exactly in line with the government's policies - and the former queen of Jaipur, Gayatri Devi, was one of the most vocal opponents of the central government.
The issue of royal gold and its confiscation sparked off one of the most heated debates in the state as the former queen used to be one of the most popular state figures.

Since then Gayatri Devi, also known as one of the most beautiful public figures in India, has retired from public life. The issue has almost been forgotten as people of the state are now much less interested in the affairs of Jaipur's royal family. Her son Bhawani Singh does not command the revered status enjoyed by his mother
BBC NEWS | South Asia | Indian ex-royals lose battle for gold
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  #27  
Old 08-01-2005, 10:47 AM
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Museum displays Indian treasures


The 249-carat 'Talisman of the Throne' ruby


An exhibition of jewellery from Mughal India goes on display at London's British Museum on Friday.

The dazzling display is based around the collection of a Kuwaiti Prince, Sheikh Nasser Sabah al-Ahmed al-Sabah, and much of it is being shown in public for the first time.

The Sheikh's collection was carried off to Baghdad as booty during the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait, but was later restored almost intact.

Most of the 300 objects on display date from the reigns of the Great Mughals, who ruled India from the mid-16th to the early 18th century.


A gold turban ornament, set with unbacked emeralds and diamonds


The collection includes daggers with gold hilts and jewel-encrusted scabbards, bracelets and toe-rings, ear-drops and turban ornaments, and a exquisitely decorated copy of the Koran in a jewelled, enamelled case.

Sheik Nasser al-Sabah has a passion for the jewels and ornaments of Mughal India, and both the taste and wealth to indulge that passion.

Manuel Keene, the curator of Sheikh Nasser's collection, has come with it to the London exhibition.

'Discerning collector'

"The great importance of it is not really the fact of the gold or the precious stones," he said, "Although it is of the highest princely quality.

"They've been selected by a very discerning collector and connoisseur for their artistic value, for their beauty."

When Iraq invaded Kuwait in 1990, many of these objects were on loan to the national museum.


The fabulous Ruby Dagger is inlaid with almost 2,400 precious stones


Along with many other valuable or useful things, they were carried off to Baghdad.

The Sheikh may have thought that he had seen the last of his fabulous collection, but Iraqi Museum officials looked after the objects entrusted to them.

After the war the collection was returned, piece by piece, to its original owner.

Just a handful of items went missing during the upheaval, although among them were three particularly fine, and very early carved emeralds, which have never been found.

The collection includes the famous Ruby Dagger, which is inlaid with nearly 2,400 precious stones and may have been worn by the Emperor Jahangir himself.

It also contains a collection of relief-carved hardstones, including nine emeralds, imported from Colombia and carved by skilled Indian craftsmen.

One of the finest stones on display is the 'Talisman of the Throne', presented to Emperor Jahangir in 1621 by the Shah of Iran.

It bears several royal inscriptions, the earliest being that of the Timurid ruler, Ulugh Beg, who ruled from 1447-1449. Most of the objects on view belonged to men, and although elaborately jewelled, the daggers and swords were entirely functional weapons.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertain...ts/1337471.stm
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  #28  
Old 08-02-2005, 06:45 AM
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Lovely pictures of great treasure, but I couldn't see some of them. Thanks anyway.
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  #29  
Old 08-02-2005, 07:23 AM
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Lend them an ear

Nicole Kidman's chandelier earrings at the Oscars had both men and women gasping. BHUMIKA K. checks out what's in store for jewellery lovers at an exhibition that starts today







Suresh Arora and Binti check out their range. — Photo: Sampath Kumar G.P.



THE OLDER the better. And invaluable. This applies to vintage cars, French wine, some women. And Indian jewellery.

India's legacy of jewellery dates back to over 5,000 years. For centuries, the country remained the sole source of diamonds and large quantities of pure gold. Principal trade routes led to India, where diamonds from Golconda, sapphires from Kashmir, rubies from Ceylon and Burma, and pearls from Bahrain were traded in the gem bazaars.

A reason perhaps why the country was plundered often. And why most of India's ancient jewellery is found today in museums in England and America. Legends abound of India's jewelled wealth — gems sold by the kilo on the streets of the Vijayanagar Empire, stories of the Koh-i-Noor, and of the Nizam jewellery collection which is said to comprise over 25,000 diamonds, 2,000 emeralds and 40,000 pearls.

Antique jewellery



Suresh and Binti Arora of Bangalore's Srishti Heritage Jewellery have gauged this obsession for ancient jewellery among the rich and suave rather well. They have pieced together antique jewellery starting from the early 19th Century, painstakingly sourcing and acquiring their collection from small-time dealers all over the country. They pulled out of their antique furniture and artefact business seven years ago to concentrate on antique jewellery.

Not only do they source ancient Indian jewellery from Rajasthan, Gujarat, Kerala, Karnataka and Tamil Nadu, they also make reproductions of stunning antique pieces, drawing from design books and photographs of ancient collections. Suresh grew up in Jaipur, among gems and jewels; Binti had an instinct for design. "Partygoers today want a change of jewellery for every evening. The younger generation looks for wearable antique jewellery. The older generation and serious collectors are our other clientele," Suresh explains.

Set in 18 or 22 karat gold, the glittering earrings are studded with rubies, emeralds and sapphires. "The younger generation prefers semi-precious stones like pink tourmalines, aquamarines, topaz and tanzanites that are more affordable and are a welcome change from the regular colours," says Suresh.

Srishti's oldest piece is a jhumki studded with Cabochon Burmese rubies from Tamil Nadu, a chandramuru earring pair, and a pair of 200-year-old, fish-shaped earrings in uncut Polki diamonds. "Many of the antique jewels make their way into the market because their owners want to trade them for contemporary jewellery. Others just don't understand or appreciate its real value. Many of the ancient royal families of India are also doing away with their collections. The purity of the gold, the stones and diamonds and the period determine the price."

The Jewellery Source Book, edited by Diana Scarisbrick, and Indian Jewellery — Dance of the Peacock are two books that form the couple's Bible — the period and authenticity of the jewellery is determined referring to these records. "We sell all our jewellery with a buyback guarantee," Suresh informs.

Rose cut diamonds that don't glitter bright and oxidised silver are used to give an "antique" feel to reproduced jewellery. Each piece is handmade and old stones are sourced for particular pieces. Affluent Indian industrialists and foreigners form a major chunk of their buyers. "A number of buyers are influenced by what Hollywood actresses wore at the Oscars. This year, chandelier earrings are in. Turquoise colours are in. We even had customers asking for the kind of earrings Karishma Kapoor wore for the film awards!"

Srishti is holding "Karan Shringar", an exhibition of their collection of earrings comprising Kundan and Polki earrings from Rajasthan, 22-carat gold from Saurashtra, enamel and gold earrings from Madhya Pradesh, temple jewellery collections of uncut diamonds and Burmese rubies from south India and Victorian art décor earrings, apart from its contemporary range.

The earrings displayed will include jhumkas, balis, vistrimurugu (fan-shaped earrings), chand balis and tribal earrings from Tamil Nadu, and a collection of Meenakari and Kundan work. Diamond earrings, Victorian style set in 18-carat gold, silver, diamond and coloured stones and a reproduction of old Cartier designs in the chandelier and stud earring collections will also be on show. Prices range from Rs. 5,000 to Rs. 50,000 a pair.

he exhibition will be on at the store in the Leela Galleria from August 16 to 19, between 10.30 a.m. and 8.30 p.m. Contact 25202208/51091373.



The whole story

EAR PIERCING dates back to centuries. Some credit ancient Iranian and Cypriot cultures with being the first to start the practice. In many cultures, it was a rite of passage, indicative of a certain class or the wealth of the wearer, or even of slavery. It was also believed to have magical or healing values. An earring prevented evil spirits from entering the body through the hole pierced. In some cultures, it was just an adornment. In others, heavy earrings were used to form elongated earlobes — a symbol of beauty. Earrings were made from bone (sometimes of whales), ivory, wood, and precious metals. While ear piercing was mostly predominant in Asian cultures, it has now caught on in the West, and is considered the most common form of body piercing.
http://www.hindu.com/thehindu/mp/200...1602950100.htm
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  #30  
Old 05-13-2008, 06:42 PM
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Koh-i-noor

One of the well known stones from indian sub continent is the Koh-in-noor (translated to mountain of light) a fine white diamond, it's 105 carats and weights 21.6g it was finally taken by the british, seized during the war.

A lot of jewles were seized from the india subcontinent when the british ruled- a shame really as it was originally 186 carats until it was recut by the british as it was lasking in lustre. It is reputed to bring misfortune or death to any male who wears or owns it. Conversely, it is reputed to bring good luck to female owners.

The Koh-i-noor is huge, here's a pic:
Google Image Result for http://www.dancewithshadows.com/society/images/koh-i-noor-diamond.jpg

Here's a replica of it in which the size of the stone can be seen (Imagine wearing thta as a ring): Google Image Result for http://www.flonnet.com/fl2223/images/20051118003809801.jpg

There's quite alot of dispute on this stone. Given the long and bloody history of the diamond, there are many countries with a claim on it. In 1976, Pakistan prime minister zulfigar Ali Bhutto Him Callaghan for the Koh-i-Noor to be returned to Pakistan. The prime minister replied to Mr Bhutto with a polite "No", and British diplomats in the countries likely to counter this claim were asked to lobby to 'kill the story'.

Other claims have been made by India, the Taliban regime of Afghanistan, and Iran. As of 2007, the gem remains in the tower of london.
asked British prime minister. It's said to be priceless but estimated at to be more than £13 billion ($26 billion) ( but in the passed it was "valued at half the daily expense of the whole world"
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Old 05-13-2008, 07:12 PM
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The hope diamond

The Hope is an Indian diamond,it's a deep blue diamond and is 45.52 carats (9.10 g) and is currently housed in the Smithson Natural History Museum in Washington DC, USA and is considered to be cursed as it was stolen from a temple.

The story goes that it formed the eye of an icon. Was it the third eye of the Lord Shiva which when gazed upon consumes the viewer with fire? One is not quite sure, but what befell Tavernier and his king after the Hope became French property underlines the legend that bad luck pursues the illegal owners of this stolen diamond. Baron Jean Baptiste Tavernier died penniless and as an obscure exile.

Here's a pic, it's a eally pretty stone : http://www.visitingdc.com/images/hope-diamond-picture.jpg

It's said to be valued at $200,000,000–$250,000,000

Seeveral other stones have been fromm the indian sub-continent the Darya -ya-Noor Diamond (Sea of Light) and Nur-Ul-Ain Diamond(The light of the eye) and the Shah diamond which no longer are in their posession- there all so pretty though!
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Old 10-03-2009, 02:22 PM
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V&A Exhibition of Maharaja's thrones, gems and weapons

From The Telegraph co.uk

Royal collections of the Maharajas

Thrones, gems and weapons once belonging to India's maharajas are to be exhibited at the V&A in London. More than 250 objects are being brought together and many are on loan in the UK for the first time.

Patiala Necklace
This Patiala Necklace is being shown for the first time and is part of Cartier's largest single commission ever. It was completed in 1928 and originally contained 2,930 diamonds and weighed almost a thousand carats.

Turban jewel, mid 18th century
Golden throne once belonging to Maharaja Ranjit Singh
Maharaja Sir Sri Krishnaraja Wodiyar IV, Bahadur of Mysore, 1906
Maharaja Sayajirao Gaekwad III, late 19th century
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  #33  
Old 10-04-2009, 09:51 PM
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Thank you "Little Star" for starting such an interesting thread- you have put so much work into it by being so thorough. I am amayzed at the intricate level of craftsmanship and stunning detail of the Indian Royal Jewelry- truly breathtaking, and quite overwhealming to take in all in one setting. I will have to study this more!
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Old 10-05-2009, 04:55 AM
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I have just been reading an interesting book "Maharanis" by Lucy Moore.
In it the Maharani Indira of Cooch Behar gave her daughter some very useful advice which was more or less never wear emeralds with a green sari, emeralds go best with pink.
When you think about it, she is giving a very good tip, which could be noted by some of the royals who wear emeralds nowadays.
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Old 05-24-2010, 03:17 AM
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Forehead Jewelry is one which is worn by Indian Brides and Women without missing out on it in marriages. The birthplace of Forehead Jewelry is from India. This jewelry is very different from any other jewelry and is hardly found in any other parts of the world. However, Jewelries worn on hair are also found in Egypt as well. Forehead Jewelry has become very popular and Fashion Designers imitated this type of jewelry very often.
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Old 05-28-2010, 07:03 AM
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Associated most exclusively with royalty. It was an emblem of power, and a change of ownership made a strong political statement. This was but a prelude to the magnificence of the Mugfuls, whose favorite horses and elephants were as opulently bedecked..
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Old 06-29-2010, 06:50 AM
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really nice share... i am from hyderabad, and i seen the jewels of nizam....
wanna hear abt the nizam should hear it from queen victoria....
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Old 07-21-2010, 05:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Warren View Post
Patiala Necklace
This Patiala Necklace is being shown for the first time and is part of Cartier's largest single commission ever. It was completed in 1928 and originally contained 2,930 diamonds and weighed almost a thousand carats.
does anybody know who owns the Patiala necklace now?
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Old 07-21-2010, 11:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by muriel View Post
does anybody know who owns the Patiala necklace now?
Cartier does own the remains of it.
"Over the years, the necklace was dismembered by the family and sold in bits and pieces. However, the original platinum chains and some of the stones surfaced in London in 1998. Cartier bought the remnants and restored the necklace using substitute gems -- cubic zirconium to fill in the open settings of the original diamonds and synthetic rubies to replace the original Burmese ones. The necklace now looks like the original to the untrained eye". - Article
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Old 07-22-2010, 05:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Kasumi View Post
Cartier does own the remains of it.
"Over the years, the necklace was dismembered by the family and sold in bits and pieces. However, the original platinum chains and some of the stones surfaced in London in 1998. Cartier bought the remnants and restored the necklace using substitute gems -- cubic zirconium to fill in the open settings of the original diamonds and synthetic rubies to replace the original Burmese ones. The necklace now looks like the original to the untrained eye". - Article
Many thanks, that is very useful.
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