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  #81  
Old 07-26-2011, 04:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Ancient Princess View Post
"Mac", as I understand it means for the man and ,"Mc" means for the woman. I have never heard of it's meaning if the child was legitimate? Can anyone comment on this. How wanderful, The Great McDonald's. Which line of McDonald? Keppoch, Ranald, Etc...
Brilliant posts & first class information Ancient Princess!
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Old 07-26-2011, 04:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Ancient Princess View Post
"Mac", as I understand it means for the man and ,"Mc" means for the woman. I have never heard of it's meaning if the child was legitimate? Can anyone comment on this. How wanderful, The Great McDonald's. Which line of McDonald? Keppoch, Ranald, Etc...
Ni/Nic is the female form
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Old 07-26-2011, 04:34 AM
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Thank you An Ard Ri for the kind post. Blessings to you, Thank you!
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Old 07-26-2011, 04:36 AM
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The great mystery of the Lost or Stolen Irish Crown Jewels and Brion Borus Sword will be my next ranting....See you all tommarrow as it is night here where I live. Deep Peace to you all....Ancient Princess
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  #85  
Old 07-26-2011, 05:37 AM
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Thank you An Ard Ri for the kind post. Blessings to you, Thank you!
You're welcome!

Are you interested in the Irish High Kings?
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Old 07-26-2011, 06:06 AM
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On BBC4 there is/was a six-part programme on the Irish kings, by Fergal Keane.
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Old 07-26-2011, 06:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Renata4711 View Post
On BBC4 there is/was a six-part programme on the Irish kings, by Fergal Keane.
Thanks Renata4711,I take its over,I have BBC3 & 4 ,must have missed it...pity!
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Old 07-26-2011, 08:41 AM
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Thanks for that info.
I have to admit when I told my Mother-in-law (the McDonald's) she was not impressed with this info of 'Bastards' in the line!!! haha
Apart from this one tour guide telling my sister I had not heard it.
I don't know the Family line.
Mother in law has details going back 6 generations, including the name of the ships that the first of my Husbands family came out on.
James McDonald was from Perthshire.

If 'Mc' is from the females - does that mean that Mc (or Nic) was a surname past down children because Mum didn't marry ???? (could be where the 'bastard' bit came from???)

Thanks for reply's - I'll be checking in on this thread more often - you are all so enthusiastic, knowledgable & interesting!

Happy Posting
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Old 07-26-2011, 11:45 AM
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Shari-aree, I am positive Mac means male and Mc means female. I hope you never take a tour with that tour guide again, something tells me she was being a tad bit rude that day. Now I know some men changing from Mac to Mc as a matter of a shorter version to write their name also. Have you checked the Offical Clan Chiefs of MacDonald website, I would trust their information as they had to not only submit their information to the Honorable Lord Lyon Courts but it had to be examined as well and then at that time it is then approved. Be very careful of gleaning anything off of Wikipedia or someones version of a genealogy that has not had it done by a certifide genealogist or historian. Best Regards to you. Ancient Princess
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Old 07-26-2011, 12:58 PM
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The Irish Kings of Dalriada

(to 501 A.D.)


The earliest beginnings of the Scottish people are also those of the MacKinnons. Around the time the Romans were in Britain (55 B.C. to 409 A.D.), there were two races occupying what is today Scotland: the Picts and the Britons. These Celtic peoples had successfully resisted the Roman legions, and what the Romans called Caledonia was never incorporated into the Empire. As a result, very little is known about these early inhabitants, apart from brief descriptions by Roman writers. As the Romans withdrew from Britain, these north islanders were faced with new invaders. These were the Scots from Ireland, and the Angles from Germany. It is with the Scots that we are concerned, for it is they who finally succeeded in conquering Scotland, uniting its peoples and giving them their line of kings. From these Scots we can also trace the descent of what became the Clan MacKinnon.
The Scots came from a kingdom in Ireland which was known as Dalriada. This kingdom corresponded roughly with the modern County Antrim in Northern Ireland. Very little is known about the kings of Dalriada apart from their names. These are found in two mediśval sources, the Book of Ballymote and the Pedigree of the Scottish Kings. The Book of Ballymote gives 38 names in its genealogy, all presented as the direct line of kings. It begins with the name Angus Turbech of Tara. Tara, incidentally, is the ancient hall of the High Kings of Ireland. It is on a hill in County Meath, …ire, and its mention in a list of Kings of Dalriada implies that the Dalriada, or "race of Riada," are descended from the High Kings. Angus was High King from 384 to 325 B.C., according to theAnnals of the Four Masters. The genealogy ends with the name of Fergus, the son of Erc. With Erc we are on firmer ground: he was a king of Dalriada who died around 501 A.D.. The Pedigree of the Scottish Kings contains 25 names, and differs somewhat from the Book of Ballymote. The last eight names, though, from Sen-chormac to Fergus, are the same. The two lists of the kings of Dalriada will be found in Table 1.The Dalriada crossed the North Channel from Ireland to Kintyre in Scotland, eventually establishing a kingdom around Argyll. The first record of this migration is in 258 A.D., when the Romans noted that Scots from the north attacked south as far as London. In time, the Dalriadan kingdom in Scotland overshadowed that in Ireland, and the kings made their home in Argyll, in its ancient capital of Dunadd. Around the year 500 A.D., the two sons of Erc, Fergus and Loarn, were kings of Dalriada in Scotland. It is from Fergus and Loarn that the MacKinnons claim descent.
Table 1
The Irish Kings of Dalriada
Book of Ballymote 1 Pedigree of the Scottish Kings
Angus Turbech of Tara
Fiachu Fer-mara
Ailill Erand
Feradach
Forgo
Maine
Arnail
Ro-Thrir
Trir
Ro-Sin
Sin
Dedad
Iar
Ailill Eogan
Eogan Eterscel
Eterscel Conaire Mor
Conaire Mor Admor
Daire Dornmor Coirpre
Coirpre Crom-chend Daire Dorn-mor
Mug-lama Coirpre Crom-chend
Conaire Coem Ellatig
Coirpre Riata Lugaid
Cindtai Mug-lama
Guaire Conaire
Cince Eochaid Riata
Fedlimid Lamdoit Fiachra Cathmail
Fiachu Tathmael Eochaid Antoit
Eochaid Antoit Achircir
Aithir Findfece
Laithluaithi Cruitlinde
Sen-chormac Sen-chormac
Fedlimid Fedlimid Ruamnach
Angus Buaidnech Angus Buidnech
Fedlimid Aislingthe Fedlimid Aislingech
Angus Angus Fir
Eochaid Muin-remor Eochaid Muin-remor
Erc Erc
Fergus Fergus

1 Genealogies from the Book of Ballymote, pp. 148-149, as quoted in Alan Orr Anderson, Early Sources of Scottish History: A.D. 500 to 1286, v. I, (Edinburgh: Oliver and Boyd, 1922). p. 153.2 Pedigree of the Scottish Kings, appended to version E of theChronicle of the Kings of Scotland in Skene'sPicts and Scots, pp. 133-134, as quoted in Ibid, p. 157.
3 Genealogies of the Kilmorie Mishnish MacKinnons, Ardra Raye McKinnon
4 Pictish list of Kings
5 Annals of the Four Masters
6 Colum Cille or St Columbas connection to MacKinnons
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Old 07-26-2011, 03:46 PM
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The Act of the Claim of Roght 1689

Claim of Right Act 1689

The Claim of Right is an Act passed by the Parliament of Scotland in April 1689. It is one of the key documents of Scottish constitutional law.


Contents

Background

In the Glorious Revolution, William of Orange landed with his army in England on 5 November 1688. King James VII of Scotland, who was also King of England and Ireland as James II, attempted to resist the invasion. He then sent representatives to negotiate, and he finally fled England on 23 December 1688.
Whilst the Convention Parliament in England declared that James, as King of England, had abdicated the Government, and issued an English Bill of Rights on 13 February 1689 offering the Crown of England to William and Mary, the Scots found themselves facing a more difficult constitutional problem. As James had not been present in Scotland during the crisis and had not fled from Scottish territory in December, it would be highly dubious to claim that he had 'abdicated' the Scottish throne.
Process

Therefore, a Convention of the Scottish Estates met to consider letters received on 16 March 1689 from the two contenders for the Crown. On 4 April they voted to remove James VII from office, drawing on George Buchanan's argument on the contractual nature of monarchy.
Later that month, the Convention adopted the Claim of Right and the Article of Grievances, enumerating what they saw as the contemporary requirements of Scottish constitutional law. It also declared that, because of his actions in violation of these laws, James had forfeited the Scottish throne. The effect of the Claim of Right was to "bolster the position of parliament within the Scottish constitution at the expense of the royal prerogative"
The Convention proceeded to offer the crown on the basis of these documents to William and Mary, who accepted it on 11 May 1689, and were proclaimed King and Queen of the Scots as William II and Mary II, though with subsequent controversy over whether the Claim of Right articles against Episcopacy were fully accepted by the new monarchy.
References
  1. Lynch, Michael (1992). Scotland: A New History. Pimlico. p. 302. ISBN 0-7126-9893-0.

2 "Claim of Right". Wikisource. http://en.wikisource
  1. Harris, Tim Revolution: The Great Crisis of the British Monarchy 1685-1720 Allen Lane (2006) pp401-402
External links
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Old 07-26-2011, 04:01 PM
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Celtic Kingship and the Fuedal Monarchy



Kingdom of Scotland in the 16th century



Parliament House in Edinburgh


Celtic Kingship

The political structure of Scotland was historically complex. During most of the existence of the Kingdom of the Scots, however, a single monarch or High King was recognized. Under the suzerainty of the High King, there were chieftains, and petty kings, and offices filled through selection by an assembly under a system known as tanistry, which combined an hereditary element with the consent of those ruled. Usually, the candidate was nominated by the current office holder on the approach of death, and his heir-elect was known as the tanist, from the Scottish Gaelic tŗnaiste.
Feudal Monarchy

After Macbeth was overthrown by MŠel Coluim III in 1057, and during the reign of King David I, the influence of Norman settlers in Scotland saw primogeniture adopted as the means of succession in Scotland, as in much of Western Europe, and witnessed the development of a 'hybrid kingdom', one part of which was governed by a mixture of a feudal government, the other following traditional Celtic customary law. These early assemblies cannot be considered 'parliaments' in the later sense of the word.
Originally, Scots owed their allegiance primarily to their Clan chieftain, or to the laird, thus the High King consistently had to keep them of favorable disposition, or else risk armed conflict.
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Old 07-26-2011, 04:44 PM
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Monarchies and the Order of Succession

Primogeniture
In primogeniture (or more precisely male primogeniture), the monarch's eldest son and his descendants take precedence over his siblings and their descendants. Elder sons take precedence over younger sons, but all sons take precedence over all daughters. Children represent their deceased ancestors, and the senior line of descent always takes precedence over the junior line, within each gender. The right of succession belongs to the eldest son of the reigning sovereign (see heir apparent), and then to the eldest son of the eldest son. This is the system in the Commonwealth Realms, Spain, and Monaco.
Fiefs or titles granted "in tail general" or to "heirs general" follow this system for sons, but daughters are considered equal co-heirs, at least in modern British practice. This can result in the condition known as abeyance. In the medieval period, actual practice varied with local custom. While women could inherit manors, power was usually exercised by their husbands (jure uxoris) or their sons (jure matris).

Equal (or absolute) primogeniture
Fully equal primogeniture (or Absolute Primogeniture) is a law in which the eldest child of the sovereign succeeds to the throne, regardless of gender, and where females (and their descendants) enjoy the same right of succession as males. The Succession to the Crown Bill of 2004 proposed changing the line of succession to the British throne to absolute primogeniture.

Agnatic succession
Agnatic (or semi-Salic) succession, prevalent in much of Europe since ancient times, is the restriction of succession to those descended from or related to a past or current monarch exclusively through the male line of descent: descendants through females were ineligible to inherit unless no males of the patrilineage remained alive.
In this form of succession, the succession is reserved firstly to all the male dynastic descendants of all the eligible branches by order of primogeniture, then upon total extinction of these male descendants to a female member of the dynasty If a female descendant should take the throne, she will not necessarily be the senior heiress by primogeniture, but usually the nearest relative to the last male monarch of the dynasty by proximity of blood.

Appointment, election, tanistry and rotation
Order of succession can be arranged by appointment: either the incumbent monarch or some electoral body appoints an heir or a list of heirs before vacancy occurs. A monarchy may be generally elective, although in a way that the next holder will be elected only after it becomes vacant.
In history, quite often, but not always, appointments and elections favored, or were limited to, members of a certain dynasty or extended family. There may have been genealogical rules to determine who all are entitled to succeed, and who will be favored. This has led sometimes to an order of succession that balances branches of a dynasty by rotation.

Seniority
In seniority successions, a monarch's or fiefholder's next sibling, actually it means almost always brother, succeeds; not his children. And, if the royal house is more extensive, (male) cousins and so forth succeed, in order of seniority, which may depend upon actual age or upon the seniority between their fathers.

Partible inheritance
In some societies, a monarchy or a fief was inherited in a way that all entitled heirs had a right to a share of it. The most prominent examples of this practice are the multiple divisions of the Frankish Empire under the Merovingian and Carolingian dynasties.

Proximity of blood
Proximity of blood is a system wherein the person closest in degree of kinship to the sovereign succeeds, preferring males over females and elder over younger siblings. This is sometimes used as a gloss for "pragmatic" successions in Europe; it had somewhat more standing during the Middle Ages everywhere in Europe. In Outremer it was often used to choose regents, and it figured in some of the succession disputes over the Kingdom of Jerusalem. It was also recognized in that kingdom for the succession of fiefs, under special circumstances: if a fief was lost to the Saracens and subsequently re-conquered, it was to be assigned to the heir in proximity of blood of the last fief-holder.

Ultimogeniture
Ultimogeniture is an order of succession where the subject is succeeded by the youngest son (or youngest child). This serves the circumstances where the youngest is "keeping the hearth", taking care of the parents and continuing at home, whereas elder children have had time to succeed "out in the world" and provide for themselves.

Lateral or fraternal system of succession
Mandates principles of seniority among members of a dynasty or dynastic clan, with a purpose of election a best qualified candidate for the leadership. The leaders are elected as being the most mature elders of the clan, already in possession of military power and competence. Fraternal succession is preferred to ensure that mature leaders are in charge, removing a need for regents. The lateral system of succession may or may not exclude male descendants in the female line from succession. In practice, when no male heir is mature enough, a female heir is usually determined "pragmatically", by proximity to the last monarch, like Boariks of the Caucasian Huns or Tamiris of Massagetes in Middle Asia. The lateral monarch is generally elected after the leadership throne becomes vacant. In the early years of the Mongol empire, the death of the ruling monarchs, Genghis Khan and ÷gedei Khan, immediately stopped the Mongol western campaigns because of the upcoming elections.
In the East Asia, the Lateral succession system is first recorded in the pre-historical period starting with the late Shang Dynasty's Wai Bing succeeding his brother Da Ding, and then in connection with a conquest by the Zhou of the Yin Shang, when Wu Ding was succeeded by his brother Zu Geng in 1189 BC and then by another brother Zu Jia in 1178

matrilinear succession
(also known as Marumakathayam), practiced in Kerala by the Nair nobility and royal families, a man's wealth and title is inherited by his sister's children, and his own children receive their inheritance from their own maternal uncles. The Maharajah of Travancore is therefore succeeded by his sister's son, and his own son receives a courtesy title but has no place in the line of succession. Since Indian Independence and the passing of several acts such as the Hindu Succession Act (1956), this form of inheritance is no longer recognised by law. Regardless, the pretender to the Travancore throne is still determined by matrilinear succession.
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Old 07-26-2011, 05:36 PM
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Royal Succession to the Crown Bill and it's effects on Ireland and Scotland

The United Kingdom of Great Britain, Scotland and Northern Ireland...

A member of parliamentís legislative motion, called a private member's bill or a member's bill in some parliaments, is a proposed law introduced by a member of a legislature. In most countries with a parliamentary system, most bills are proposed by the government, not by individual members of the...it is aimed at reforming the manner of succession to the British Monarchy

Monarchy of the United Kingdom
The monarchy of the United Kingdom is the constitutional monarchy of the United Kingdom and its overseas territories. The present monarch, Queen Elizabeth II, has reigned since 6 February 1952. She and her immediate family undertake various official, ceremonial and representational duties...

House of Lords

The House of Lords is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, the United Kingdom's national legislature...

Labour Party (UK)
The Labour Party is a centre-left democratic socialist political party in the United Kingdom.Labour surpassed the Liberal Party in general elections during the early 1920s, forming minority governments under Ramsay MacDonald in 1924 and 1929-1931. The party was in a wartime coalition from 1940 to...

Alfred Dubs, Baron Dubs is a Czech-born British Labour Party politician and former Member of Parliament.- Youth and education :...

on 9 December 2004, and withdrawn by him on 14 January 2005, after the Government said that it would block the Bill.

It would have involved three major measures: firstly, the change of the form of primogeniture
Primogeniture
Primogeniture is the right, by law or custom, of the firstborn to inherit the entire estate, to the exclusion of younger siblings . Historically, the term implied male primogeniture, to the exclusion of females...

used from male-preferring ("feudal") to fully equal ("absolute") primogeniture ó that is, that the eldest child would succeed regardless of gender; secondly, that the Acts of Union 1707
Acts of Union 1707

The Acts of Union were two Parliamentary Acts passed in 1706 by the Parliament of England, and in 1707 by the Parliament of Scotland, which put into effect the terms of the Treaty of Union that had been agreed on 22 July 1706, following negotiation between commissioners representing the parliaments...

Scotland

Scotland is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. Occupying the northern third of the island of Great Britain, it shares a border with England to the south and is bounded by the North Sea to the east, the Atlantic Ocean to the north and west, and the North Channel and Irish Sea to the...

England and Wales

England and Wales is a jurisdiction within the United Kingdom. It consists of England and Wales, two of the four countries of the United Kingdom...

as well as other relevant legislation, be altered to remove the clauses forbidding the monarch or heirs from marrying any Catholic; and, thirdly, the revocation of the Royal Marriages Act 1772
Royal Marriages Act 1772
The Royal Marriages Act of 1772 is an Act of the Parliament of Great Britain which prescribes the conditions under which members of the British Royal Family may contract a valid marriage, in order to guard against marriages that could diminish the status of the Royal House...

which requires descendants of King George II
George II of Great Britain

George II was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-LŁneburg and Archtreasurer and Prince-elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death....

(other than descendants of princesses who married foreigners) to obtain the Sovereign's consent to marry. However, the provisions of the Act of Settlement 1701
Act of Settlement 1701
The Act of Settlement is an act of the Parliament of England that was originally filed in 1700 and passed in 1701 to settle the succession to the English throne on the Electress Sophia of Hanover and her Protestant heirs...

barring the monarch from being Catholic, would have still remained in force.

The line of succession to the British throne lists people eligible to succeed to the throne of the United Kingdom and the other Commonwealth realms in order of

It was unclear as to how the Bill would have affected the lines of succession
Order of succession
An order of succession is a formula or algorithm that determines who inherits an office upon the death, resignation, or removal of its current occupant.-Monarchies and nobility:...

To the other 15 Commonwealth Realm
Commonwealth Realm
A Commonwealth realm is a sovereign state within the Commonwealth of Nations that has Elizabeth II as its monarch and head of state. The sixteen current realms have a combined land area of 18.8 million km≤ , and a population of 134 million; all but about two million live in the six most populous...

The Bill drew on the recommendations of the Fabian Society
Fabian Society

The Fabian Society is a British socialist movement, whose purpose is to advance the principles of democratic socialism via gradualist and reformist, rather than revolutionary, means. It is best known for its initial ground-breaking work beginning late in the 19th century and continuing up to World...

Commission on the Future of the Monarchy, which reported in 2003. Lord Dubs is a member of the Fabian Society's Executive Committee.
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Old 07-26-2011, 05:53 PM
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Does anyone know if the BBC History of the Irish Kings is out on DVD yet? Can not wait to see it, sounds wonderful. Who is the historian that the BBC has procured? Blessing to you all and will check in later with the ,"Great Mystery of the Lost Royal Jewels of Ireland and the Mighty Sword of Brion Boru", should be interesting to see what everyone thinks. Deep Peace and Blessings to you all...Ancient Princesss
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Old 07-28-2011, 09:49 AM
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Current Chief of Clan MacGregor statement verifying they are not descended from Alpin

Many sources claim we are descended from Griogar, said to have been the third son of Alpin, King of Scotland, who commenced his reign in 833. Alternatively claims have been made for descent from his eldest brother, Kenneth MacAlpine, but these are both impossible to trace. According to Buchanan of Auchmar, the Clan Gregor were located in Glenorchy as early as the reign of Malcolm Canmore (1057-1093). Hugh of Glenorchy appears to have been the first of the Chiefs who was so styled. Before this the Clan system, as we know it, was not in place.

Major Sir Malcolm MacGregor of MacGregor
7th Baronet, 24th Chief of Clan Gregor
(photo taken in 1996)

There were four principal Clan Gregor families descended from Gregor of the Golden Bridles. These were Glenstrae, Glencarnaig, Roro, and Glengyle. The Chiefs originally were of the Glenstrae branch which died out as a result of long persecution. Leadership then often switched from one to the other of the three remaining families.
Rob Roy MacGregor was never a Clan Chief but was considered a "Captain," leading the Clan in battle, and was Tutor to Gregor Macgregor, otherwise called James Graham of Glengyle or Glýn Dubh (Black Knee), after his father died leaving him the Chiefship of the Glengyle branch when he was just 10 years old. In clanship a Captain would be appointed as a military leader when the Chief was a minor or otherwise unsuited for the role.
In 1714 Alexander Drummond (or MacGregor) of Balhaldie (Bohaldy), of the Roro line was elected was Chief. He was succeeded by his son, William before 1743. William was created a baronet in the Jacobite peerage by James the Old Pretender. William's eldest son was Alexander born in 1758 and suceeded his father in 1765. The latter Alexander became a Captain in the 65th Regiment. In 1774, when the Act of Proscription against Clan Gregor was finally repealed, another election was organised and General John Murray Macgregor of Lanrick, descended from the Glencarnaig line, was acclaimed as the new Chief. He was elected while Alexander of Balhaldie was still alive and serving in the army in the West Indies. Alexander of Balhaldie raised an unsuccessful court action against Sir John Murray. [see note below by #18]
The current Chief is descended from the Glencarnaig line.


The following list is only an approximation and is subject to frequent revisions. Most of the dates are estimated. There are a series of obits up to Gregor (John Murray) no. 12 who died in 1629. Thereafter the succession passed to his brother Patrick Roy who was alive in 1651. The records are rather vague about the succession of the descendants of Ewin the tutor which ended with Kilmanan.
  • Griogair of the Golden Bridles, b~1300; d~1360
  • Eoin cam (Ian of the One-Eye), son of Griogair, .b~1325; obit.1390
  • Eoin dubh, son of Eoin cam, b~1350; obit.1415
  • Gille-coluim (Malcolm "the lame lord"), son of Eoin dubh, b~1375; obit.1440
  • Padraig, son of Gille-coluim, b~1405; obit.1461
  • Eoin dubh, son of Padraig, b~1440 obit.1519 (his son Maol-coluim dsp 1498)
  • Eoin MacEoghan, gt-gt-gt-grandson of #3. Eoin dubh, b~1480; obit 1528
  • Alasdair ruadh of Glenstrae (Allister Roy), son of Eoin MacEoghan, b~1515; obit 1547
  • Eoin ruadh, son of Alasdair ruadh, b~1540; obit 1550
  • Griogair ruadh of Glenstrae 'The arrow of Glen Lyon', brother of Eoin ruadh,


    b~1541; executed 1571

  • Alasdair ruadh of Glenstrae, son of Griogair ruadh, b~ 1569; executed 1604
  • Gregor, alias John Murray, nephew of Alasdair ruadh, b ~1599. last recorded 1639 (sold Glenstrae to Glenorchy in 1624)
  • Patrick Roy, brother of Gregor, b~1600; d~1650s
  • James, son of Patrick Roy d~ 1670s (?)
  • Gregor, son of Malcolm, g-son of Ewin the tutor, d~ 1680s
  • Archibald of Kilmanan, cousin of Gregor, d~ 1704
  • Alexander MacGregor or Drummond of Balhaldie (Bohaldy) - Roro - elected in 1714, d.1743
  • William Macgregor Drummond of Balhaldie succeeded his father 1743. d. ~1765
  • [Alexander MacGregor Drummond of Balhaldie, b1758, succeeded 1765.]

    Alexander of Balhaldie was not elected and was living outside Scotland. Had he been more dynamic the opportunity for Sir John to campaign for the chiefship might not have arisen. There were also disputes about the seniority and right of the original Balhaldie in 1714. Alexander unsuccessfully sued Sir John Murray in 1795. Note the numbering suggests that Sir John Murray did not accept the succession of William in 1743.

  1. Sir John Murray (Macgregor) of Lanrick (Glencarnaig branch), elected chief in 1775. Baronetcy created in 1795
  2. Sir Evan John Macgregor 1785-1841, 2nd Baronet of Lanrick, founder of the Clan Gregor Society in 1822 Obtained royal license to resume the name MacGregor in 1822.
  3. Sir John Athole Bannatyne Macgregor of MacGregor, 3rd Baronet, 1810-1851
  4. Sir Malcolm Murray Macgregor of MacGregor, 4th Baronet, b.1834, d.1879
  5. Sir Malcolm MacGregor of MacGregor, RN, 5th Baronet. b.1873
  6. Brigadier Sir Gregor MacGregor of MacGregor, 6th Baronet. b.1925, d.2003
  7. Major Sir Malcolm MacGregor of MacGregor, 7th Baronet.
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Old 07-28-2011, 10:47 AM
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The (Current) Honorable Chieftess Elizabeth Fairbairn of McKay

The Mackays in Scotland were based in Strathnaver in modern Sutherland. Although the exact origin of Clan Mackay is unknown, it is generally accepted that they belonged to the early Norse population of Scotland, although, given their geographical proximity to the Norse immigrants, it is likely that the two races later intermarried. The most popular and accepted theory as to the origins as being Norweigen and in 1325 the chieftainship of the Clan Mackay was there established.

In 1314 the a Mackay fought under Robert the Bruce at the Battle of Bannockburn where they helped defeat the English.Later in the 14th century, in 1371 two Mackay chieftains were murdered, father and son, at Dingwall Castle by Nicholas Sutherland of Duffus, head of one of the junior branches of Clan Sutherland. Much bloodshed followed, including a retaliatory raid on Dornoch in 1372. The cathedral was once again set on fire and many Sutherland men were hanged in the town square. After this, the feud quietened down as both sides were called away to fight against the English.
15th century and clan conflicts


A Victorian era romantic illustration of a MacKay clansman by R. R. McIan.


In 1403 the Battle of Tuiteam Tarbhach was fought between Clan MacKay and Clan MacLeod of Lewis. This battle was fought at Tuiteam-tarbhach in the south-west Sutherland, where it meets Ross. Angus MacKay of Strathnaver married the sister of the MacLeod of Lewis. MacLeod found that his sister had been mistreated, and on his way home he decided to despoil Strathnaver and Brae-Chat in Sutherland. In the ensuing battle, MacLeod was killed. In 1411 the Battle of Dingwall took place in which Clan Donald defeated Clan MacKay. The two clans afterwards fought together on the same side at the Battle of Harlaw and chief Angus Dubh MacKay married a daughter of Donald of the Isles.In 1425 Angus Dubh MacKay spoils Moray.
In 1426 Battle of Harpsdale took place where Chief Angus Dubh MacKay, with his son Neil, entered Caithness with hostile intent, and lays waste the land. The inhabitants of Caithness assembled and fought Angus Dubh at Harpsdale, where there was great slaughter on both sides. Soon afterwards King James I came to Inverness, intending to pursue Angus Dow MacKay. Angus submitted himself to the King's mercy, and gave his son Neil as a pledge of his future obedience. The King accepted, and sent Neil MacKay to remain in captivity on the Bass Rock, in the Firth of Forth; he was afterwards called Neil Bhasse or Whasse.
In 1431 the Battle of Drumnacoub took place. Angus Dubh MacKay defeated Angus Moray near Tongue in Sutherland. Angus married Elizabeth, sister to Domhnall of Islay, Lord of the Isles. Her dowry was 100 fighting men from Lochaber. Their sons were known as the Abrach MacKays and inherited Elizabeth's coat of arms whose supporters were bears.
In 1438 the Battle of Ruoig-Hansett took place: The men of Caithness were overthrown at Sandside Chase by Neil Bhasse MacKay after his release from the Bass Rock. He skirmished with some of the inhabitants of that province at a place called Sanset, where he overthrew them with slaughter on either side. This conflict was called Ruaig-hanset, that is the Chase at Sanset. Neil Bhasse died shortly afterwards. In 1464 the Battle of Blare Tannie took place, fought by Clan Keith, assisted by the MacKays, against Clan Gunn. The inhabitants of Caithness assembled an army and met the MacKays and Keiths at Blair-tannie in Caithness. There ensued a cruel fight, with slaughter on both sides. The Keiths and MacKays were victorious.
In 1486 the Battle of Tarbat took place. The Clan Mackay and Clan Ross had long been at feud, again and again the Rosses had suffered molestation of their lands by their enemies and when at last, driven to desperation and thoroughly infuriated, they gathered their forces and marched against the MacKays, they were in the mood to teach them a severe lesson. The MacKays, with Angus MacKay of Strathnaver at their head, were defeated by the Rosses and sought shelter in the church of Tarbat where many were slain. The church was set on fire and Angus MacKay and many of his clansmen were burnt to ashes.This was followed by the Battle of Auldicharish: To take revenge on Clan Ross, chief Ian MacKay, helped by a force from Clan Sutherland, marched south invading the territory of Clan Ross and began laying waste to it. Chief Alistair Ross gathered his force of 2000 men and engaged in a long and desperate battle with the invading forces. In the end the battle went against the Rosses with the MacKays and Sutherlands gaining the upper hand. The Ross chief was killed along with many of his clan.In 1493 - The MacKays invade the Rosses again, and take much spoil.
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Old 07-28-2011, 12:11 PM
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King Kenneth I of Alpin to Ardra Raye McKinnon

Here is Ardra Raye MacKinnons line through King Alpins first son Kenneth I of Alpin.
King Kenneth I 74th of Pictish Alba & Scotland (810 - 859) is your 31st great grandfather to Ardra Raye McKinnon (Kilmorie Mishnish Line)


Constantine I of Scotland (836 - 877)
Son of King Kenneth I 74th

Donald II of Scotland ( - 900)
Son of Constantine I

Malcolm I of Scotland (880 - 954)
Son of Donald II

Kenneth II of Scotland ( - 995)
Son of Malcolm I

Malcolm II of Scotland (954 - 1034)
Son of Kenneth II

Princess Bethoc of Scotland (984 - 1045)
Daughter of Malcolm II

King Duncan I of Scotland (1001 - 1040)
Son of Princess Bethoc & Crinan of Dunkeld had five children
1 Duncan I
2 Margaret of Northumbria
3 Donald of Moray
4 Melmare of Atholl
5 Malcolm III

Prince Malcolm Ceann Mor Dunkeld of Scotland (1031 - 1093)
Son of King Duncan I

King David I of Scotland (1085 - 1153)
Son of Prince Malcolm Ceann Mor Dunkeld

Prince David Huntington (1144 - 1219)
Son of King David I

Countess Isabel De Huntington (1197 - 1251)
Daughter of Prince David

Robert II of Annadale De Brus or De Bruce (1210 - 1295)
Son of Countess Isabel

Robert III De Brus or De Bruce (1243 - 1304)
Son of Robert II of Annadale

King Robert IV Bruce (1274 - 1329)
Son of Robert III

Marjorie Bruce (1296 - 1316)
Daughter of King Robert IV

King Robert II of Scotland Stewart (1316 - 1390)
Son of Marjorie

Robert Duke of Albany Stewart (1341 - 1449)
Son of King Robert II of Scotland

Sir Robert 1rst Lord of Lorn Stewart (1383 - 1451)
Son of Robert Duke of Albany

John 2nd Earl of Lorn Stewart (1400 - 1463)
Son of Sir Robert 1rst Lord of Lorn

Isabel Elizabeth Stewart (1437 - 1510)
Daughter of John 2nd Earl of Lorn

Archibald 2nd Earl of Argyle Campbell (1459 - 1513)
Son of Isabel Elizabeth

Katherine Campbell
Daughter of Archibald 2nd Earl of Argyle

Catherine of Coll McLean (1576 - )
Daughter of Katherine

Sir & Chief Lachlan Mor of Kilmorie Line of the Royal older line of Mackinnon*** (1628 - 1706)
Son of Catherine of Coll

Chief Ian Na of Mishnish Royal of Kilmorie Mackinnon*** (1659 - 1750)
Son of Sir & Chief Lachlan Mor of Kilmorie Line

Lt John of Mishnish and Royal Kilmorie Mackinnon*** (1735 - 1774)
Son of Chief Ian Na of Mishnish Royal

Major John of Mishnish and Royal Kilmorie Mackinnon*** (1752 - )
Son of Lt John of Mishnish and Royal Kilmorie

Hugh I of Mishnish and Royal Kilmorie Mackinnon*** (1803 - 1885)
Son of Major John of Mishnish and Royal Kilmorie

William Alexander of Mishnish and Royal Kilmorie MacKinnon*** (1822 - 1912)
Son of Hugh I of Mishnish and Royal Kilmorie

William Edwin of Mishnish and Royal Kilmorie MacKinnon*** (1863 - 1951)
Son of William Alexander of Mishnish and Royal Kilmorie

William Clarence of Mishnish and Royal Kilmorie MacKinnon*** (1889 - 1959)
Son of William Edwin of Mishnish and Royal Kilmorie

Ardra Raye of Mishnish and Royal Kilmorie McKinnon*** (1937 - )
Daughter of William Clarence of Mishnish and Royal Kilmorie
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Old 07-28-2011, 12:15 PM
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King Donald I of Alpin to Ardra Raye McKinnon (Kilmorie Mishnish)

King Donald or Dungal I 75th King Royal of Alpin*** (811 - 863)
is your 32rd great grandfather to Ardra Raye McKinnon. The Line is a straight descent of all elder males till Ardra. Kenneth I of Alpins line to Ardra switchs back and forth to older and younger siblings (male and female) and stops at MacBeth in which his stepson Lulach (not of original Alpin bloodline) takes the crown by force.

Prince Girig Royal of Alpin*** (835 - 889)
Son of King Donald or Dungal I 75th King Royal

Prince Doungallus Royal of Alpin*** (875 - )
Son of Prince Girig Royal

Chief Finguine/Findanus Royal MacFhingone/MacKinnon*** (933 - 976)
Son of Prince Doungallus Royal

Chief MacFindanus/Finleac Royal MacFhingone/MacKinnon*** (950 - 1020)
Son of Chief Finguine/Findanus Royal

Chief Donald Royal MacFhingone/MacKinnon*** (967 - 1033)
Son of Chief MacFindanus/Finleac Royal

Chief Cormac Royal MacKinnon*** (983 - 1066)
Son of Chief Donald Royal

Chief Lachlan Royal MacKinnon*** (1031 - 1096)
Son of Chief Cormac Royal

Chief Lachlan Royal MacKinnon*** (1052 - 1126)
Son of Chief Lachlan Royal

Chief Kenneth Royal MacKinnon*** (1082 - 1156)
Son of Chief Lachlan Royal

Chief Donald Royal MacKinnon*** (1099 - 1186)
Son of Chief Kenneth Royal

Chief Lachlan Royal MacKinnon*** (1126 - 1216)
Son of Chief Donald Royal

Chief Eowin Royal MacKinnon*** (1149 - 1246)
Son of Chief Lachlan Royal

Chief Alpin Royal MacKinnon*** (1166 - 1252)
Son of Chief Eowin Royal

Chief Lachlan Royal MacKinnon*** (1198 - 1294)
Son of Chief Alpin Royal

Chief Donald Royal MacKinnon*** (1224 - 1315)
Son of Chief Lachlan Royal

Chief Eobhan Royal MacKinnon*** (1261 - 1351)
Son of Chief Donald Royal

Chief Lachlan or John ,"Sa Gartach" Royal MacKinnon*** (1328 - 1350)
Son of Chief Eobhan Royal

Chief Lachlan Na Thiomlaidh, "Vir Nobilis" Royal MacKinnon*** (1345 - 1442)
Son of Chief Lachlan or John ,"Sa Gartach" Royal

Chief Nial Buidh Royal MacKinnon*** (1365 - 1460)
Son of Chief Lachlan Na Thiomlaidh, "Vir Nobilis"

Chief Lachlan Bhan Royal MacKinnon*** (1402 - 1501)
Son of Chief Nial Buidh Royal

Chief Nial Bhan Royal MacKinnon*** (1500 - 1572)
Son of Chief Lachlan Bhan Royal

Chief Ewen or Eoghan Rudh nan Cath Royal MacKinnon*** (1517 - 1557)
Son of Chief Nial Bhan Royal

Chief Lachlan Dhu The Black Hair MacKinnon*** (1545 - 1634)
Son of Chief Ewen or Eoghan Rudh nan Cath Royal

Sir & Chief Lachlan Royal MacKinnon*** (1562 - 1634)
Son of Chief Lachlan Dhu The Black Hair

Chief Ian Balbhan The Dumb Royal Kilmorie MacKinnon*** (1579 - 1642)
Son of Sir & Chief Lachlan Royal

Sir & Chief Lachlan Mor of Kilmorie Line of the Royal older line of Mackinnon*** (1628 - 1706)
Son of Chief Ian Balbhan The Dumb Royal Kilmorie

Chief Ian Na of Mishnish Royal of Kilmorie Mackinnon*** (1659 - 1750)
Son of Sir & Chief Lachlan Mor of Kilmorie Line

Lt John of Mishnish and Royal Kilmorie Mackinnon*** (1735 - 1774)
Son of Chief Ian Na of Mishnish Royal

Major John of Mishnish and Royal Kilmorie Mackinnon*** (1752 - )
Son of Lt John of Mishnish and Royal Kilmorie

Hugh I of Mishnish and Royal Kilmorie Mackinnon*** (1803 - 1885)
Son of Major John of Mishnish and Royal Kilmorie

William Alexander of Mishnish and Royal Kilmorie MacKinnon*** (1822 - 1912)
Son of Hugh I of Mishnish and Royal Kilmorie

William Edwin of Mishnish and Royal Kilmorie MacKinnon*** (1863 - 1951)
Son of William Alexander of Mishnish and Royal Kilmorie

William Clarence of Mishnish and Royal Kilmorie MacKinnon*** (1889 - 1959)
Son of William Edwin of Mishnish and Royal Kilmorie

Ardra Raye of Mishnish and Royal Kilmorie McKinnon*** (1937 - )
Daughter of William Clarence of Mishnish and Royal Kilmorie
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Old 07-28-2011, 12:38 PM
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Ard Righ King Heremon to King Alpin (Lorn)

Ard Righ King Heremon^*** of Ireland


Ard Righ King Irial Faidh*** of Ireland
Son of Ard Righ King Heremon^***

Ard Righ Eithrial*** of Ireland
Son of Ard Righ King Irial Faidh***

Ard Righ King Foll Aich*** of Ireland
Son of Ard Righ Eithrial***

Ard Righ King Tigermas*** of Ireland
Son of Ard Righ King Foll Aich***

Ard Righ King Enboath*** of Ireland
Son of Ard Righ King Tigermas***

Ard Righ King Smiomghall*** of Ireland
Son of Ard Righ King Enboath***

Ard Righ King Fiacha Labhrainn*** of Ireland
Son of Ard Righ King Smiomghall***

Ard Righ Olmucach*** of Ireland
Son of Ard Righ King Fiacha Labhrainn***

Ard Righ King Main of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ Olmucach***

Ard Righ King Rotheachtach of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ King Main

Ard Righ King Dein of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ King Rotheachtach

Ard Righ King Siorna Saoghalach of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ King Dein

Ard Righ King Olioll Aolcheoin of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ King Siorna Saoghalach

Ard Righ King Gialchadh of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ King Olioll Aolcheoin

Ard Righ King Nuadhas Fionnfail of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ King Gialchadh

Ard Righ King Aedan Glas of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ King Nuadhas Fionnfail

Ard Righ King Simeon Breac of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ King Aedan Glas

Ard Righ King Muredach Bolgach of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ King Simeon Breac

Ard Righ King Fiacha Tolgrach of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ King Muredach Bolgach

Ard Righ King Duach Ladhrach of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ King Fiacha Tolgrach

Ard Righ King Eochaidh Buadhach of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ King Duach Ladhrach

Ard Righ King Ugaine Mor of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ King Eochaidh Buadhach

Ard Righ King Cobthach of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ King Ugaine Mor

Ard Righ King Melg Molbhthach of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ King Cobthach

Ard Righ King Iaran Gleofathhach of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ King Melg Molbhthach

Ard Righ King Conla Caomh of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ King Iaran Gleofathhach

Ard Righ King Oioll Cas Fiachlach of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ King Conla Caomh

Ard Righ King Aochaidh Alt Leathan of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ King Oioll Cas Fiachlach

Ard Righ King Aongus Teamreach of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ King Aochaidh Alt Leathan

Ard Righ King Enna Algeach of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ King Aongus Teamreach

Ard Righ King Fionn of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ King Enna Algeach

Ard Righ King Eochaidh Feidhlioch 93rd of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ King Fionn

Ard Righ King Breas Nar Lothar 96th of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ King Eochaidh Feidhlioch 93rd

Ard Righ King Lugaidh Sriabh nDearg 98th of Ireland*** ( - 1980)
Son of Ard Righ King Breas Nar Lothar 96th

Ard Righ King Crimthann Naidh-Nar 100th of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ King Lugaidh Sriabh nDearg 98th

Ard Righ King Fearedach 102nd of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ King Crimthann Naidh-Nar 100th

Ard Righ King Fiacha Fionn 104th of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ King Fearedach 102nd

Ard Righ King Tuathal Teachmar of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ King Fiacha Fionn 104th

Ard Righ King Fedhlimidh Rachtmar The Lawgiver of Ireland***
Son of Ard Righ King Tuathal Teachmar

Ard Righ King Conn Ceadcatha of Ireland*** (461 - 511)
Son of Ard Righ King Fedhlimidh Rachtmar The Lawgiver

Ard Righ King Erc of Ireland*** (420 - 500)
Son of Ard Righ King Conn Ceadcatha

Ard Righ King Fergus Mor MacErc of Ireland*** (437 - 516)
Son of Ard Righ King Erc

Ard Righ King Gabran I Cenel Lorne of Ireland*** (454 - 534)
Son of Ard Righ King Fergus Mor MacErc

Ard Righ King Gabran II of Lorn of Ireland*** (470 - )
Son of Ard Righ King Gabran I Cenel Lorne

Ard Righ King Aedan of Lorn of Ireland*** (495 - 585)
Son of Ard Righ King Gabran II of Lorn

Ard Righ King Eochu Buide of Lorn of Ireland*** (565 - 630)
Son of Ard Righ King Aedan of Lorn

Ard Righ King Domnall I Brecc of Lorn of Ireland*** (588 - 642)
Son of Ard Righ King Eochu Buide of Lorn

Ard Righ King Domangart II of Lorn of Ireland*** (600 - 673)
Son of Ard Righ King Domnall I Brecc of Lorn

Ard Righ King Eochaid II of Lorn of Ireland*** (635 - 697)
Son of Ard Righ King Domangart II of Lorn

King Eochaidh III of Lorn of Pictish Dalraida*** (665 - 721)
Son of Ard Righ King Eochaid II of Lorn

King Aodh Hugh Fionn of Lorn of Pictish Alba*** (695 - 778)
Son of King Eochaidh III of Lorn

King Eochaidh IV 73rd King or Eochy of Lorn of Pictish Alba*** (739 - 839)
Son of King Aodh Hugh Fionn of Lorn

King Alpin of Lorn Royal of Pictish Alba*** (784 - 841)
Son of King Eochaidh IV 73rd King or Eochy of Lorn
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