The Royal Forums Coat of Arms


Join The Royal Forums Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
  #341  
Old 03-20-2017, 08:00 AM
Nobility
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: St Thomas, U.S. Minor Outlying Islands
Posts: 433
Abdication panel to compile final proposal a month later than planned | The Japan Times


The plans have already been delayed by a month, and further delays may be problematic.

Questions mount over abdication / Residence, budget, title among issues as panel reconvenes - The Japan News

Quote:
Where the Emperor would reside and the size and budget of the organization that would assist him must also be decided. Whether to conduct the “Taiso-no-Rei” imperial funeral ceremony should the Emperor pass away after abdication, and whether to enable the former Emperor to assume the post of regent, are further matters that need to be discussed.

There are concerns the Emperor’s activities after abdication would in some way “duplicate” the incumbent’s role as a national symbol.


In November, an official of the Imperial Household Agency said at a meeting of the expert panel that after abdication, the Emperor’s public duties “would basically all be handled by the new emperor.”


The accession of the crown prince brings up the question of compensation for Prince Akishino, who would become first in the line of imperial succession. Although Akishino will not be the new emperor’s “crown prince,” his public duties would likely increase, so some are saying that his compensation may need to be improved. The government is considering increasing his compensation to the level of a crown prince.

I do not know why the article claims that Fumihito would "not be the new emperor's crown prince." As it was said, he would be the first in the line of succession and his duties would increase.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #342  
Old 03-20-2017, 10:43 AM
Serene Highness
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: NN, Lithuania
Posts: 1,347
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tatiana Maria View Post
Abdication panel to compile final proposal a month later than planned | The Japan Times


The plans have already been delayed by a month, and further delays may be problematic.

Questions mount over abdication / Residence, budget, title among issues as panel reconvenes - The Japan News




I do not know why the article claims that Fumihito would "not be the new emperor's crown prince." As it was said, he would be the first in the line of succession and his duties would increase.
A Crown prince is heir apparent. Prince Akishino will be heir presumptive.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #343  
Old 03-21-2017, 12:04 AM
Royal Highness
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Bay Area, United States
Posts: 1,571
Just as the Imperial House law didn't account for abdication, it states "Crown Prince" is for an Imperial heir who is the son the Emperor. Not brother of Emperor, next-in-line, etc.
Quote:
The son of the Emperor who is the Imperial Heir is called "Kotaishi" (Crown Prince). In case there is no Kotaishi (Crown Prince), the grandson of the Emperor who is Imperial Heir is called "Kotaison" (Imperial House Law, Article 8).
The Imperial family - The Imperial Household Agency

Updating who's eligible for the Crown Prince title probably requires another bill. It's easier to increase Prince Akishino's budget for additional staff and security.
Reply With Quote
  #344  
Old 03-21-2017, 03:12 PM
Nobility
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: St Thomas, U.S. Minor Outlying Islands
Posts: 433



True, but the article was surprising as the papers have hitherto anticipated that Fumihito would be conferred a crown princely title (Kotaitei) by the special legislation.


Quote:
Questions mount over abdication / Residence, budget, title among issues as panel reconvenes - The Japan News

In November, an official of the Imperial Household Agency said at a meeting of the expert panel that after abdication, the Emperor’s public duties “would basically all be handled by the new emperor.”
Quote:
The Imperial Household Agency told the panel meeting on Jan. 11 that as a rule the new emperor will take over all public duties performed by the emperor, adding that, however, what the former emperor will do as public services will depend on his intention and not to be forced by a third party.
Many legal revisions needed before Emperor's possible abdication - The Mainichi
Reply With Quote
  #345  
Old 03-21-2017, 06:48 PM
Daenerys Targaryen's Avatar
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: The Blue Ocean, United States
Posts: 174
If the Emperor is to abdicate, I wish his last act is to remove male primogeniture and allow the Crown Prince's daughter become the heir.
Reply With Quote
  #346  
Old 03-22-2017, 05:36 AM
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Victoria, Australia
Posts: 224
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daenerys Targaryen View Post
If the Emperor is to abdicate, I wish his last act is to remove male primogeniture and allow the Crown Prince's daughter become the heir.

Succession is governed by the Imperial Household Law 1947, and the Constitution of 1947 expressly excludes the Emperor from exercising any powers related to government. That is why in his address to the nation the Emperor did not use the word abdication. Great care has been taken to avoid the appearance of the Emperor telling the government to do something, as that would be unconstitutional. As for the succession, there is absolutely nothing the Emperor can do about it.
Reply With Quote
  #347  
Old 03-23-2017, 03:20 AM
Royal Highness
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Bay Area, United States
Posts: 1,571
Gov't mulls using 'joko' as emperor's post-abdication title - The Mainichi
Quote:
[…]

Four university professors were summoned to the panel's 10th meeting to give their views on the issue including what status the 83-year-old emperor should be given after his retirement and three of them proposed he assume the historical title of "joko" or its official form of "daijo tenno" (retired sovereign) in line with past imperial practice.

The government is inclined to adopt joko over daijo tenno out of concerns the latter also means "the noblest" and could place the retired emperor above the new one, the sources said.

The panel resumed its discussion Wednesday, two months following its last meeting in January, to consider remaining issues regarding the emperor's abdication such as his status after becoming the first living emperor to relinquish the throne in around 200 years as well as the status of Prince Akishino, second son of the emperor, after Crown Prince Naruhito becomes the new emperor.

[…]

The three professors also proposed Emperor Akihito's future tomb be equivalent in status to those of past emperors.

The fourth expert was a doctor specializing in geriatric diseases, who gave his views on the emperor's workload from a medical point of view.

[…]

During Wednesday's panel meeting, the three experts who proposed "joko" as the emperor's post abdication title were Keiko Hongo, a professor of Japanese medieval history at the Historiographical Institute of the University of Tokyo, Naotaka Kimizuka, a professor of British political and diplomatic history at Kanto Gakuin University, and Hitoshi Nitta, a professor of Shinto religion at Kogakkan University.

Masahiro Akishita, a doctor and professor at the University of Tokyo's graduate school, said an excessive workload could be a source of stress and cause ill health for a person of the emperor's age but that losing his workload or social role entirely could also prompt rapid aging.

[…]
Japanese Mainichi included opinions on the Crown Prince title: (I cleaned up google's translation a bit)
Quote:
The Imperial House Law defines "Emperor's [son] is the Crown Prince" and Mr. Akishino is not the Crown Prince because he is the younger brother of the Emperor. The Empress and the Crown Princess are regarded as court royalty who live together with the Emperor, but in the current system the Akishinomiya family is regarded as the other royal family. The increase in public service will be expected, but the cost of living and the number of staff to be assisted will remain lower than the current crown prince.

Mr. Hongo focused on the title of the imperial family as "the crown god". "If my grandchild is a successor, I have a crown grandchild, so I suggest you write down the relationship with the Emperor," suggesting that the title of "Crown Prince" be newly established. On the other hand, Mr. Kimitsuka pointed out that the king's younger brother in the Middle East uses the title of "the crown prince", "The clear title is clear when it is a successor to the throne" in terms of the tightness with foreign countries I insisted. Mr. Nitta argued that interpretation should be changed so that the royal family who ranked first in the ranking of the throne is "the crown prince." Although the precedent of "the crown prince" also has history, it is said that it is necessary to amend the Imperial House Law.
Hmm...Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko's post-abdication workload shouldn't be too hard to figure out. Without the state and Shinto duties or frequent travels, I assume the retired Imperial couple would pursue their own interests (i.e. - academic studies for Akihito) and occasionally appear at concerts, museums, and such. Similar to the Hitachi couple's activities/public service.
Reply With Quote
  #348  
Old 03-23-2017, 04:57 AM
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Victoria, Australia
Posts: 224
Jōkō seems the most appropriate title for the Emperor after his abdication. Historically though, it was on becoming the Jōkō that an emperor, free from ritual responsibilities, could actually take an active role in ruling Japan. Jōkō - 上皇, or its full form Daijō Tennō - 太上天皇, is translated as Retired Emperor, but interestingly the literal translation of the Chinese characters/Japanese kanji is something like Grand Exalted Heavenly Sovereign. I wonder what title the Empress is likely to get? Kōtaigō - 皇太后 is translated as Empress Dowager, but, again, a more literal translation is Grand Empress, so maybe it will be considered a suitable title for the consort of the Jōkō.
Reply With Quote
  #349  
Old 03-25-2017, 06:32 PM
Royal Highness
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Bay Area, United States
Posts: 1,571
NHK reports Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko could return to Togu Palace (aka East Palace or Crown Prince Residence) after abdication. However, a temporary residence is necessary as it will take time to relocate everyone. Other details:
  • Togu Palace may be renamed to reflect its proper status; historically, a former Emperor’s residence was called "Sendu Imperial Palace"
  • After Emperor Showa died, his Imperial Residence was renamed "Fukiage Omiya Imperial Palace" where Empress Kojun lived until her death in 2000.
  • The current Imperial Residence was completed in spring of 1993. Emperor Akihito, Empress Michiko, and Princess Sayako moved in that December.
  • Akihito and Michiko spent more than 30 years at Togu Palace which was completed in 1960.
  • Naruhito and Masako moved into Togu Palace in July 1994.
  • Besides private rooms for the family, it features reception rooms/halls, offices for IHA, and a tennis court.
  • The term "East Palace" has been used for the residence of the Crown Prince since the Nara period.
ETA: Mainichi reports the name "Sengong Imperial Palace" is also under consideration for a former Emperor's residence.
Reply With Quote
  #350  
Old 03-27-2017, 06:34 PM
Royal Highness
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Bay Area, United States
Posts: 1,571
Emperor intends to quit public activities after abdication: The Asahi Shimbun
Quote:
Emperor Akihito plans to withdraw from public activities as the symbol of the state, as well as from constitutional duties, following his abdication, sources have revealed.

Those activities, including visiting areas affected by natural disasters, New Year’s greetings to well-wishers and holding dinners and garden parties, are not clarified in the Constitution, unlike the "kokuji koi" state acts.

Akihito has already conveyed his intention to his sons, Crown Prince Naruhito and Prince Fumihito, and obtained consent from both, the sources said.

Concern was expressed in the abdication hearings held by the government’s council of intellectuals that duality could occur between Akihito and the new emperor.

[…]

“Events and ceremonies held in various parts of the country; visits to foreign countries; visits to areas affected by natural disasters; and memorial services for the war dead. All of these are proof that the emperor has pursued what the emperor should be as the symbol of the state,” said an Imperial Household Agency source.

“He apparently thinks that if he abdicates, he will concede all of them to the person who serves as the symbol of the state,” the source added.
Reply With Quote
  #351  
Old 03-27-2017, 07:20 PM
ROYAL NORWAY's Avatar
Heir Presumptive
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: somewhere, United Kingdom, Norway
Posts: 2,515
Thanks Prisma!

You posted this article in another post:
Gov't mulls using 'joko' as emperor's post-abdication title - The Mainichi
Quote:
Masahiro Akishita, a doctor and professor at the University of Tokyo's graduate school, said an excessive workload could be a source of stress and cause ill health for a person of the emperor's age but that losing his workload or social role entirely could also prompt rapid aging.
As Masahiro Akishita says, losing his workload or social role entirely could also prompt rapid aging.

Q: What will happen if he's not going to do anything? Answer: He's going to fade away and die much sooner than he would have done if he had remained on the throne.

This abdication is as all abdications (with the exception of Spain) a bad idea and someone should talk some sense into him.
__________________
The Queen is the most wonderful, forgiving, non judgmental person I know. Sarah Ferguson speaking in 2011.
Reply With Quote
  #352  
Old 03-28-2017, 01:02 AM
Royal Highness
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Bay Area, United States
Posts: 1,571
You're welcome!

I think Emperor Akihito has carefully considered abdication: it's been years since he first revealed his wish to IHA and Empress Michiko in 2010.

It's likely he's very much looking forward to retirement. More time with Michiko, his hobbies/studies, and family. Less traveling and hopefully less protocol. Should he return to the East Palace or anywhere within Akasaka Estate, one benefit would be being closer to the Akishino family and additional training for Prince Hisahito.

Poor communication between the government and IHA continues. According to Sankei 1:
  • At 7pm on March 25th, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe was "astounded to learn that NHK reported the Emperor [would] switch homes with the Crown Prince after abdication."
  • The government's expert panel has not gotten to discussing residences.
  • Sources claim the IHA leaked to NHK.
  • Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga did not hide [his] discomfort at the press conference on 27th, "I do not know at all, I have no idea what kind of grounds are being covered on the basis, it is funny that such reports are [outrageous], there is absolutely no report."
Sankei 2 reports on March 27th, the IHA is considering CP Naruhito taking over some public service before Emperor Akihito's abdication. "According to officials of the Imperial Household Agency, this view is also based on [Akihito's] wishes." CP Naruhito has represented his father in the past and "considering the physical condition and burden of both [Majesties], there will also be official duties taken over by the crown prince before the concession." They maintain "further reduction of official duties is difficult."
Reply With Quote
  #353  
Old 03-28-2017, 02:01 AM
Muhler's Avatar
Majesty
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Eastern Jutland, Denmark
Posts: 9,379
Quote:
Originally Posted by ROYAL NORWAY View Post
Thanks Prisma!

You posted this article in another post:
Gov't mulls using 'joko' as emperor's post-abdication title - The Mainichi

As Masahiro Akishita says, losing his workload or social role entirely could also prompt rapid aging.

Q: What will happen if he's not going to do anything? Answer: He's going to fade away and die much sooner than he would have done if he had remained on the throne.

This abdication is as all abdications (with the exception of Spain) a bad idea and someone should talk some sense into him.
Well, he is well into his 80's there is a very considerable possibility that he might die, before the abdication even takes place.
His health is, everything considered, surprisingly good but he can't do as much as he used to.
I think he has deserved to retire and make room for his son, while CP Naruhito is still in his prime.
Apart from that emperors were supposed supposed til live a retired life for centuries. Particularly under the shoguns. Dedicating themselves to art, culture and religion. Preferably never leaving Kyoto. - So historically speaking there is ample precedence for an emperor to live retired lives.

Most importantly though, this is just as much a political act. It has so to speak stirred the pot in regards to the imperial family's role, the role of the emperor, the influence of the court, of the politicians and led to a public and serious debate about female succession.
Titles, where to live and what to do are details.
Reply With Quote
  #354  
Old 03-28-2017, 07:42 AM
ROYAL NORWAY's Avatar
Heir Presumptive
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: somewhere, United Kingdom, Norway
Posts: 2,515
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prisma View Post
You're welcome!

I think Emperor Akihito has carefully considered abdication: it's been years since he first revealed his wish to IHA and Empress Michiko in 2010.

It's likely he's very much looking forward to retirement. More time with Michiko, his hobbies/studies, and family. Less traveling and hopefully less protocol. Should he return to the East Palace or anywhere within Akasaka Estate, one benefit would be being closer to the Akishino family and additional training for Prince Hisahito.
I agree! But if he loses all of his public duties (if that's what's going to happen) it could have a negative impact on his health.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Prisma View Post
Poor communication between the government and IHA continues. According to Sankei 1:
  • At 7pm on March 25th, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe was "astounded to learn that NHK reported the Emperor [would] switch homes with the Crown Prince after abdication."
  • The government's expert panel has not gotten to discussing residences.
  • Sources claim the IHA leaked to NHK.
  • Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga did not hide [his] discomfort at the press conference on 27th, "I do not know at all, I have no idea what kind of grounds are being covered on the basis, it is funny that such reports are [outrageous], there is absolutely no report."
Abe seems to bee astounded by everything when it comes to this abdication, and it looks like the Emperor has more control over the IHA than we thought.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Prisma View Post
Sankei 2 reports on March 27th, the IHA is considering CP Naruhito taking over some public service before Emperor Akihito's abdication. "According to officials of the Imperial Household Agency, this view is also based on [Akihito's] wishes." CP Naruhito has represented his father in the past and "considering the physical condition and burden of both [Majesties], there will also be official duties taken over by the crown prince before the concession." They maintain "further reduction of official duties is difficult."
Sensible and completely natural.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Muhler View Post
Well, he is well into his 80's there is a very considerable possibility that he might die, before the abdication even takes place.
His health is, everything considered, surprisingly good but he can't do as much as he used to.
I think he has deserved to retire and make room for his son, while CP Naruhito is still in his prime.
Apart from that emperors were supposed supposed til live a retired life for centuries. Particularly under the shoguns. Dedicating themselves to art, culture and religion. Preferably never leaving Kyoto. - So historically speaking there is ample precedence for an emperor to live retired lives.

Most importantly though, this is just as much a political act. It has so to speak stirred the pot in regards to the imperial family's role, the role of the emperor, the influence of the court, of the politicians and led to a public and serious debate about female succession.
Titles, where to live and what to do are details.
1. I agree that he deserves to retire (since that's what he obviously wants), but that doesn't mean that I agree with it.

And as most of you know, I'm not a big fan of abdications and I think that's affects my thinking when it comes to Emperor Akihito and his retirement. I think it's the British and Norwegian in me (because most of us don't like abdications).

2. I agree, but titles, where to live and what to do are key details.
__________________
The Queen is the most wonderful, forgiving, non judgmental person I know. Sarah Ferguson speaking in 2011.
Reply With Quote
  #355  
Old 04-01-2017, 03:22 AM
eya eya is offline
Majesty
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: -, Greece
Posts: 7,537
Post-abdication title considered for Empress - The Japan News

"The government is considering using the term “jokogo” as the title of the Empress in the case that the Emperor abdicates, it has been learned. Under the current Imperial Household system, after an emperor dies, the empress, who is his spouse, is then called “kotaigo.”"
Reply With Quote
  #356  
Old 04-01-2017, 09:00 PM
Nobility
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: St Thomas, U.S. Minor Outlying Islands
Posts: 433
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muhler View Post
Most importantly though, this is just as much a political act. It has so to speak stirred the pot in regards to the imperial family's role, the role of the emperor, the influence of the court, of the politicians and led to a public and serious debate about female succession.
It is most certainly Akihito's ambition.

The lonely struggle of Japan's democratic emperor - Nikkei Asian Review

Quote:
[The emperor] seems to want the people of Japan to engage in a candid debate about abdication, the rules governing imperial succession and perhaps, more broadly, the meaning of the Imperial House in contemporary Japanese society.

[…] Frustratingly for him, however, the rest of the nation would prefer to let sleeping dogs lie, for various reasons. […]

From the time of the Meiji Restoration of 1868, the state has made sure that citizens cannot casually discuss the ancient Imperial House, having reinvigorated it from its centuries-old dormancy and reinvented it as the crux of modern Japanese nationalism.

Despite its tainted history as the rallying point of Japan's wartime ultranationalism […] national deference for the institution has survived. This was largely enabled by the U.S. Cold War policy of rebuilding a stable Japan as the most important ally in East Asia, with the emperor system providing a spiritual continuity for the vanquished nation.

[…] Most polls indicated that the majority of Japanese approved of altering the abdication law. Abe, a staunch nationalist obsessed with retaining the mystique of the protocol-shrouded imperial institution intact, responded by appointing the aforementioned advisory panel. By taking swift action to enable the one-time bill, he was trying to avoid any chances for permanent reforms, involving not only the abdication question but also the female succession question, a likely development as Akihito's elder son and heir, Naruhito, has just one child, a daughter.

[…]

[The emperor's friend] Akashi quite correctly pointed out that public opinion differs from the government's official view. As recently as late January, Kyodo News polls showed that 63.3% of respondents still preferred a permanent solution allowing future emperors to abdicate, while 26.9% favored the government's one-off legislation. It is equally true, however, that nobody is standing up for the emperor beyond responding sympathetically in polls. Neither are the mainstream media spearheading a critical debate, seemingly reluctant to upset the increasingly powerful government.

[…] Emperor Akihito has consistently tried to square his public role with his democratic principles, instilled from boyhood, most notably by his American Quaker tutor Elizabeth Vining. She taught him the valuable lesson, again in the words of his confidant, Akashi: "Man must act on his own will." […]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prisma View Post
Poor communication between the government and IHA continues. According to Sankei 1:
  • At 7pm on March 25th, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe was "astounded to learn that NHK reported the Emperor [would] switch homes with the Crown Prince after abdication."
  • The government's expert panel has not gotten to discussing residences.
  • Sources claim the IHA leaked to NHK.
  • Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga did not hide [his] discomfort at the press conference on 27th, "I do not know at all, I have no idea what kind of grounds are being covered on the basis, it is funny that such reports are [outrageous], there is absolutely no report."
I wonder whether Akihito and Abe have in fact made efforts to communicate with one another.
Reply With Quote
  #357  
Old 04-01-2017, 09:40 PM
Muhler's Avatar
Majesty
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Eastern Jutland, Denmark
Posts: 9,379
I don't think Abe, who is a staunch nationalist, is particularly keen on this abdication-thing, and certainly not interested in any further debate. So I think he has resigned to this particular issue and simply want to get it over with as soon as possible. - And preferably as quietly as possible!

And in that respect he can (regrettably IMO) count on the Japanese media.
The Japanese media, especially the public service media, is not critical of the government! There is a strong Japanese tradition of the authorities know best.
That means Japanese media aim for consensus rather than diverting opinions. That trait is very much ingrained in the Japanese national character. I.e. you conform to the group, no matter what you may think privately.

It was very much evident during the tsunami and the radioactive fall-out. Fall-out that polluted agricultural products (albeit a low grade of pollution) which were among other places, served in schools.
Such a thing would cause an uproar in practically any other country on the globe - but not in Japan.
The government, the authorities, the rest of the societies, said it was okay, so people may have been apprehensive personally, but conformed and ate the products...
I know of at least one case where a mother was communally chastised because she left Japan (Tokyo in this case) until she had a better view of the situation. - She was chastised because she left the group (i.e. Japan) for selfish reasons (to protect her children), rather than stay put like everybody else.

The Emperor voiced his concern, discreetly, in a speech in India. And that was reported by the Indian media - but not by the Japanese media.
To suggest that the authorities do not have the situation under control, is almost subversive. It's expressing a loss of faith in the group, of Japan. Not having full control of the situation (in this case radioactive contaminated products served to children!) is a loss of face and you betray the group by suggesting otherwise.

Japan is a very consensus and group oriented society, where the interest of the group, of the society, far outweigh the interest of the individual.
That also explains to some degree the dismissive, almost angry, reaction some have to the Emperor's wish to abdicate. - He is putting his own interests above the group, above the consensus of the group. He is creating diversion instead of consensus, in a society which for practical reasons put consensus very high and presenting a face (or facade if you will) of unity towards the rest of the world.
He is rocking the boat. You don't rock the boat in Japan!

That's why Japan and the Japanese is such an endlessly fascinating culture and sometimes extremely difficult to understand.
Reply With Quote
  #358  
Old 04-04-2017, 09:22 AM
Fürstin Taxis's Avatar
Serene Highness
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Neuschwanstein, Germany
Posts: 1,235
https://twitter.com/Gertsroyals/stat...47446140112896
'Gov still working on creating laws to allow it, but it now looks like Emperor Akihito of Japan may abdicate Dec 23, 2018 (his 85th birthday)_

Damn, the Japanese government is tough.
__________________

To be a legend, you've either got to be dead or excessively old!
Christopher Lee
Reply With Quote
  #359  
Old 04-07-2017, 03:32 AM
Royal Highness
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Bay Area, United States
Posts: 1,571
Some updates from Sankei, Asahi, and Mainichi:
  • No title change for Prince Akishino and family
  • The Akishino name has existed for nearly 30 years and some panel members voiced concerns about losing the name if he's made Crown Prince
  • The Akishino house aka Akishinomiya will move to "court royalty" (aka "inner court") and receive a budget in line with current Crown Prince
  • Prince Akishino cannot leave the Imperial Family
  • When abroad, he is to be styled as "Crown Prince" to receive treatment equivalent to a crown prince
  • After abdication, Emperor Akihito should not qualify for roles as regent, temporary substitute for state acts, or an Imperial House Council member
  • Next panel meeting is on the 13th
Reply With Quote
  #360  
Old 04-07-2017, 11:04 AM
Nobility
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: St Thomas, U.S. Minor Outlying Islands
Posts: 433
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prisma View Post
Some updates from Sankei, Asahi, and Mainichi:
  • No title change for Prince Akishino and family
  • The Akishino name has existed for nearly 30 years and some panel members voiced concerns about losing the name if he's made Crown Prince
  • The Akishino house aka Akishinomiya will move to "court royalty" (aka "inner court") and receive a budget in line with current Crown Prince
  • Prince Akishino cannot leave the Imperial Family
  • When abroad, he is to be styled as "Crown Prince" to receive treatment equivalent to a crown prince
The Akishino name will unavoidably be lost when Mako and Kako Akishino become commoners and Hisahito Akishino becomes the emperor. If Fumihito Akishino is to receive treatment and perform official duties equivalent to a Kotaishi, it is appropriate to style him as Kotaitei. English Mainichi confirms that there were historical cases when Kotaitei was used.

Quote:
  • After abdication, Emperor Akihito should not qualify for roles as regent, temporary substitute for state acts, or an Imperial House Council member
I suppose they have in mind to limit his power after the abdication.
__________________

Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko Picture Thread jun5 Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko 77 07-22-2016 04:23 AM
Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko's golden Jubilee Marquesa d Yolombó Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko 21 04-18-2009 03:47 PM
Emperor Akihito's and Empress Michiko's State Visit to the Baltics May 24-27, 2007 Mandy Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko 28 06-27-2007 12:55 AM
Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko: Current Events Part 1: May 2003 - September 2006 Jacqueline Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko 214 09-27-2006 01:33 PM
Emperor Akihito And Empress Michiko jun5 Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko 46 01-12-2004 08:36 PM




Popular Tags
albania ascot 2016 best gown september 2016 best outfit birthday christening coup d'etat crown prince frederik crown princess mary crown princess mary eveningwear crown princess mary fashion crown princess mette-marit denmark duchess of cambridge duke of cambridge earthquakes europe fashion poll jewels journalism king abdullah ii king abdullah in new zealand king carl gustaf and queen silvia king willem-alexander luxembourg national day 2016 member introduction monarchy new zealand nobel 2016 norway november 2016 october 2016 picture of the week picture of the week december prince charles prince felix prince philip princess mary princess mary daytime fashion princess mary fashion princess mette-marit fashion and style princess sofia queen letizia queen letizia casual outfits queen letizia daytime fashion queen letizia fashion queen margrethe queen mathilde queen mathilde daytime fashion queen mathilde fashion queen mathilde hats queen maxima queen rania queen rania daytime fashion queen rania eveningwear queen rania fashion queen silvia september 2016 state visit succession sweden swedish royal family summer portraits the duchess of cambridge casual wear the duchess of cambridge daytime fashion the duchess of cambridge fashion the duchess of cambridge hats tiara tiaras valentino visit to canada


Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:49 PM.

Social Knowledge Networks

eXTReMe Tracker
Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2017
Jelsoft Enterprises