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  #21  
Old 02-09-2011, 11:46 PM
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You cannot lump the situation of different Arab countries as one.

There was no doubt that under Hassan II, levels of repression were quite high- lessening, presumably, due to the Western Sahara issue and Western pressures. He gradually allowed democratisation and a new constitution.

Under Mohammed VI, that process has continued. In fact, elections in Morocco are the most democratic in the Arab world, the fact that parties which had been in opposition to Hassan II have since become part of government would attest to that. It compares favourably to the sort of regimes that existed in Egypt and Tunisia- namely republican dictatorships whose leaders and close associates held not only absolute power, but looting much of its wealth.

So while it is not perfect, Morocco is better-placed to deal with problems because the monarchy has overseen a democratisation process through which this can be channelled. The people of Egypt and Tunisia never had such an opportunity. In fact, even the absolute monarchies of the Gulf states have done a better job of both looking after their citizens and listening to their concerns.
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  #22  
Old 02-10-2011, 01:13 AM
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The present King was very intuitive in bringing in more democratization to Morocco during his reign especially when Al-Quaeda set off bombs in, I believe, Rabat a few years ago. He and his family stepped up their accessibility and support of the public as one part of an effort to stave off radical Islamists. The King was also wise enough to realize that in autocratic and corrupt states such as Egypt and Tunisia, radical Islamists have success in winning over converts to their causes.
Laura Ingram is a extreme right conservative commentator in the US and I wouldn't place credibility in anything that comes out of that woman's mouth. She is comparable to Rush Limbaugh, an idiot. She also came out with extremely racist remarks about President Obama until the GOP told her to cool it.
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  #23  
Old 02-10-2011, 02:44 PM
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Originally Posted by David V View Post
You cannot lump the situation of different Arab countries as one.

There was no doubt that under Hassan II, levels of repression were quite high- lessening, presumably, due to the Western Sahara issue and Western pressures. He gradually allowed democratisation and a new constitution.

Under Mohammed VI, that process has continued. In fact, elections in Morocco are the most democratic in the Arab world, the fact that parties which had been in opposition to Hassan II have since become part of government would attest to that. It compares favourably to the sort of regimes that existed in Egypt and Tunisia- namely republican dictatorships whose leaders and close associates held not only absolute power, but looting much of its wealth.

So while it is not perfect, Morocco is better-placed to deal with problems because the monarchy has overseen a democratisation process through which this can be channelled. The people of Egypt and Tunisia never had such an opportunity. In fact, even the absolute monarchies of the Gulf states have done a better job of both looking after their citizens and listening to their concerns.
Good analysis David. Actually the process of democratisation had started under reign of late King Hassa ll, and his son is doing good concreete job. It's not only communication an mediatisation for western medias, like it's done in Jordan for example.
In Morocco, people used from long time to show their hanger without any frictions with the power. Medias can some how touch to moroccan royals and critisize them when they want, and even the cousin of the actual King is outspoken about things his cousin the King have to improve, those things are not allowed in any other Arab or Muslim country so far.
The sucess of the moroccan monarchy is due basically to moroccan royals who behave like moroccan people and not like foreigens who came from an other planet to rule them as it's the case in some ME countries.
Morocco has lot to improove, but it's in good way.
There's no comparaison between the moroccan monarchy and any other arab regime or monarchy.
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  #24  
Old 02-10-2011, 06:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Sephora View Post
Good analysis David. Actually the process of democratisation had started under reign of late King Hassa ll, and his son is doing good concreete job. It's not only communication an mediatisation for western medias, like it's done in Jordan for example.
In Morocco, people used from long time to show their hanger without any frictions with the power. Medias can some how touch to moroccan royals and critisize them when they want, and even the cousin of the actual King is outspoken about things his cousin the King have to improve, those things are not allowed in any other Arab or Muslim country so far.
The sucess of the moroccan monarchy is due basically to moroccan royals who behave like moroccan people and not like foreigens who came from an other planet to rule them as it's the case in some ME countries.
Morocco has lot to improove, but it's in good way.
There's no comparaison between the moroccan monarchy and any other arab regime or monarchy.
In terms of democratic practice you are right. The only other Arab countries that can approach Morocco in terms of democratic practice, i.e. free and fair elections, would be Algeria and to an extent Lebanon. The issue here is not only democracy, but also quality of life and social security.

While countries such as UAE and Qatar do not possess democratic institutions, their rulers do communicate with their citizens, and provide for their citizens in terms of welfare and living standards. That's much better than what we saw eventuate in Egypt and Tunisia, whose rulers are much more cynical. At least in an absolute monarchy, what you see is what you get.
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  #25  
Old 02-10-2011, 09:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Katrianna View Post
The present King was very intuitive in bringing in more democratization to Morocco during his reign especially when Al-Quaeda set off bombs in, I believe, Rabat a few years ago. He and his family stepped up their accessibility and support of the public as one part of an effort to stave off radical Islamists. The King was also wise enough to realize that in autocratic and corrupt states such as Egypt and Tunisia, radical Islamists have success in winning over converts to their causes.
Laura Ingram is a extreme right conservative commentator in the US and I wouldn't place credibility in anything that comes out of that woman's mouth. She is comparable to Rush Limbaugh, an idiot. She also came out with extremely racist remarks about President Obama until the GOP told her to cool it.
You are right on the mark.
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  #26  
Old 02-11-2011, 08:54 AM
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David and Sephora you're made some very important points about the situation, although you're not Moroccan(I think) I see you are well informed

I just want to make something clear here protests for better life has never never been something unsual in Morocco...I was eating my breakfast this morning while watching the news the France 24 channel reported(and sound like an exclusive breaking news) that 1000 unemployedytoung men protest in front of parliement...while those protest exist from let's say:forever.young used to go in the front of the Partliment sit in looong strikes asking for a job and some get a job via the govenement other no other join the group when they cant find a job and replace those who go and so go on .... not like it's a good thing or something but this situation isn't new...what I want to say is going out in march to protest you'r life condition isn't something rare or unsual here and sure can't be relitded now in what happen in Tunisia or Egypt...

Hassan II began what can we call it a democratisation of the country he was so clever to know that the only way for his rule and the monarchy to survive is to open the doors for the other to share in the making of the state futur so the big opposed to the monarchy Mr youssefi get back to Morocco and was appointed by Hassan II as PM to set a "consensus government" .... his son M6 have also adds (and still) to this experience he set a programes and plans for change in every domains in the country and ppl started to fell some changes in their life he also promises a free and democratic elections and that what happen and for the first time in our history and maybe a first for all the arab countries we go an elected PM in elections called free and fair by international observers.
the PM don't have as much power as the king yet I admit that but I think things is coming slwoly to that and this is what we expect in the end to happen.
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  #27  
Old 02-11-2011, 12:02 PM
Aristocracy
 
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Originally Posted by shrifia View Post
David and Sephora you're made some very important points about the situation, although you're not Moroccan(I think) I see you are well informed

I just want to make something clear here protests for better life has never never been something unsual in Morocco...I was eating my breakfast this morning while watching the news the France 24 channel reported(and sound like an exclusive breaking news) that 1000 unemployedytoung men protest in front of parliement...while those protest exist from let's say:forever.young used to go in the front of the Partliment sit in looong strikes asking for a job and some get a job via the govenement other no other join the group when they cant find a job and replace those who go and so go on .... not like it's a good thing or something but this situation isn't new...what I want to say is going out in march to protest you'r life condition isn't something rare or unsual here and sure can't be relitded now in what happen in Tunisia or Egypt...
Yes while protests have happened in Morocco and Algeria, but it seems they are working in both countries to meet protesters' demands. They are better able to do so because they have freer systems of government. Compared to Egypt, Tunisia, Syria and Yemen whose regimes are cynical and downright hypocritical in their practice. I say that because that is what they are- they take the forms of republics with "elective" leadership, but in reality they are just like the worst absolute monarchies.

Quote:
Hassan II began what can we call it a democratisation of the country he was so clever to know that the only way for his rule and the monarchy to survive is to open the doors for the other to share in the making of the state futur so the big opposed to the monarchy Mr youssefi get back to Morocco and was appointed by Hassan II as PM to set a "consensus government" .... his son M6 have also adds (and still) to this experience he set a programes and plans for change in every domains in the country and ppl started to fell some changes in their life he also promises a free and democratic elections and that what happen and for the first time in our history and maybe a first for all the arab countries we go an elected PM in elections called free and fair by international observers.
the PM don't have as much power as the king yet I admit that but I think things is coming slwoly to that and this is what we expect in the end to happen.
Yep it's kind of like the French Fifth Republic system, where the head of state (in this case the King) and the head of government (the PM, officially accountable to Parliament) share the executive power.

There was the "Years of Lead" with deplorable human rights abuses. There was also the threat Morocco would go the same way as Iran, except that it wasn't nearly as bad. The Western Sahara issue afforded the King the chance to win support from the opposition, which is what happened, and was linked to the liberalisation of the system under the monarchy. You also cannot discount the role the Carter and Reagan administrations played- either the pressure to respect human rights, and the need to justify American aid (which happened elsewhere too)- that would have led Hassan to liberalise his rule.

The guided reform process under the Alaouite monarchy, thus, is preferable to most other state models existing in the Arab world.
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  #28  
Old 02-12-2011, 01:26 AM
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Egypt: After Mubarek, What's Next?
This Friday Feb. 11, 2011 marks history for Egypt as Mubarak was forced to step down after over 3 decades of dictatorship. It's almost one month after Tunisia's revolt and the escape of Zine "Al Haribine" Ben Ali.
So, let's discuss the new reality and answer the following questions:
1- How will be the transition process and the amendment of the constitution in Egypt?
2- Who will be the contenders for the presidential election?
3- Will Egypt keep its commitments in the peace process with Israel & the rest of the World?
4- Will Muslim Brotherhood engage in democratic process and accept tolerance & cohabitation principles with all other Egyptian communities & the rest of the world?
3- Which country will be next in the rest of the Arab world?
As previously said, it is worth to believe that Algeria will follow the trend and then Yemen and Syria will surely face the same destiny etc.
Thank you,
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  #29  
Old 02-12-2011, 07:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Halaoui1 View Post
Egypt: After Mubarek, What's Next?
This Friday Feb. 11, 2011 marks history for Egypt as Mubarak was forced to step down after over 3 decades of dictatorship. It's almost one month after Tunisia's revolt and the escape of Zine "Al Haribine" Ben Ali.
So, let's discuss the new reality and answer the following questions:
1- How will be the transition process and the amendment of the constitution in Egypt?
2- Who will be the contenders for the presidential election?
3- Will Egypt keep its commitments in the peace process with Israel & the rest of the World?
4- Will Muslim Brotherhood engage in democratic process and accept tolerance & cohabitation principles with all other Egyptian communities & the rest of the world?
3- Which country will be next in the rest of the Arab world?
As previously said, it is worth to believe that Algeria will follow the trend and then Yemen and Syria will surely face the same destiny etc.
Thank you,
What does a post about Egypt and Tunisia is doing in moroccan monarchy topic??? There's no relationship! It's like comparing apples with oranges
As we said before, there's no comparaison between moroccan monarchy and those regimes, even not gulf monarchies which are close to that in term of non respect of democracy, can't be compared as the absolute power is a part of the tribal arab tradition.
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  #30  
Old 02-12-2011, 01:13 PM
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Sephora - I'm not comparing anything here and I know how to make a difference between apples & oranges. FYI, please log on the following links to view some of my recent posts in LinkedIn:
Competences Marocaines A L’ Etranger Group:
http://www.linkedin.com/groupItem?view=&gid=44685&type=member&item=40445979&qid=90e00d58-151e-441e-a744-bad5257e7092&goback=%2Egmp_44685

Morocco Board News Group, Washington DC:
http://www.linkedin.com/groupItem?view=&gid=2284236&type=member&item=40450323&qid=ae29d16e-9b72-45c3-b361-7906c049fde7&goback=%2Egmp_2284236

Having said that and whether you like it or not as we are in a global village, if something of big magnitude happens anywhere in the world, be sure it immediately affects everybody and more importantly the neighbors.

In this respect, for any case analysis we must use a breakthrough thinking assessment process that helps evaluate each factor, parameter of the overall situation, determine the correlation and interdependence that exist between each point and player, put together all possible Scenarios/Action Plans then discuss and decide accordingly which strategy/plan you need to implement and pursue based on the findings/situation.

For the specific situation in the region, we must admit there are natural, cultural, religious and political correlations between each country and even though the Kingdom of Morocco under the leadership and right vision of HM King Mohammed VI is well ahead of its peers in the Arab world in terms of democracy, human rights, political stability, social housing programs etc, we have to be vigilant, pay great attention for anything happening around us and, be proactive and not reactive. Nobody is immune and for that we need to constantly adapt our country's strategy and communication with the neighbors as well as the rest of the world.

Furthermore, we have to consider this unpleasant situation in the rest of North Africa as an opportunity to capitalize on our political stability and national cohesion around HM King Mohammed VI and better sell Morocco's image, products and source to all our partners and target markets around the world as a matter of fact Tunisia and Egypt are direct competitors to Morocco in the area of Tourism, Textile & Garment, Agro-industry, outsourcing etc and there are many orders placed and vacation planned in both countries that unfortunately for them have been canceled for security reason and Morocco can be a great alternative for those clients and tourists etc.
Thank you,
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  #31  
Old 03-01-2011, 06:25 PM
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In Morocco, protest efforts not taking hold
CASABLANCA, Morocco — Efforts to kindle a protest movement in Morocco have met with only limited success, evidence of support for King Mohammed VI and of the effectiveness of tight security around the country.
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  #32  
Old 03-09-2011, 07:43 AM
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Morocco protests fail to take hold
CASABLANCA, MOROCCO - Efforts to kindle a protest movement in Morocco have met with only limited success, evidence of support for King Mohammed VI and of the effectiveness of tight security around the country....Source
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  #33  
Old 03-21-2011, 12:52 PM
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Renewed protests in Morocco despite king's reform pledge
Rabat - Thousands of protesters on Sunday once again took to the streets in Morocco to call for democracy and social justice, despite extensive reforms promised by King Mohammed VI.
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  #34  
Old 04-26-2011, 07:17 AM
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Yahoo stays that due to that young man the monarchy of Morocco is in trouble
Oussama el-Khlifi, détonateur de la contestation au Maroc - Yahoo! Actualités
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