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  #161  
Old 04-26-2010, 08:40 AM
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Having scanned briefly over this rather lengthy topic - what struck me was the amount of mis-information about Haemophilia.

Speaking from experience, I can state the following:
* it is passed from mother to son
* daughter may be carriers - though not all daughters
* it is not passed from father to son
* it can appear in a family without a history - in fact over 75% of cases are from a mutated gene and not from a family history of the disease
* there is no cure and treatment is via intravenous infusion of blood or recombinant (engineered blood product) and the frequency of treatments depends upon the severity of the disease
* in the past, some symptoms have been mis-diagnosed as haemophilia (ie: frequent bruising)
* female can have a form of haemophilia (which is usually identified by severe amaemia, heavy menstrual cycle, and unexplained bruising - not identified with any other illness)
* considering the age in which Victoria family lived, haemophilia alone cannot be attributed to the death of all males at a young age (who may have had the disease)

There are many types of haemophilia and other bleeding disorders - and it could be a case of assuming who had what - considering the lack of knowledge about the disease at that time. We today can put a name to it and it's "offspring" - I rather think that it was an case of the unknown back then.
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  #162  
Old 04-26-2010, 05:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Melisende View Post
* it is not passed from father to son
But it may be passed from father to daughter.
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  #163  
Old 04-26-2010, 08:57 PM
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I thought it could only be carried by females?
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  #164  
Old 04-26-2010, 09:31 PM
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But it may be passed from father to daughter.

No it can't. Only females are carriers, meaning that a mother can pass it to a daughter or a son, but a father cannot. A child can only get the gene from their mother.
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  #165  
Old 04-26-2010, 10:06 PM
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I believe information shows that a haemophilic father can in fact pass the gene onto a daughter but not to a son.
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  #166  
Old 04-26-2010, 10:25 PM
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A hemophiliac father will always pass the gene to his daughter (and never to his son). It's possible for women to actually have the disease if they have a hemophiliac father and a mother who at least carried it. (And women who are carriers can have mild symptoms.)
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  #167  
Old 04-27-2010, 06:18 PM
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I was thinking to Princess Alice, Countess of Athlone: she was a carried of aemophilia, and passed it to her eldest son who died of this disease in 1928 after a car accident.
Considering that Alice's father, Prince Leopold, suffered and died of aemophilia too, I guess that he passed the disease to Alice.
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  #168  
Old 04-27-2010, 06:23 PM
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This is bad disease,I remember reading about Crown Prince Alexei,very sad.
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  #169  
Old 04-28-2010, 06:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Roderick View Post
I believe information shows that a haemophilic father can in fact pass the gene onto a daughter but not to a son.
That is what I have read also.
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  #170  
Old 04-28-2010, 08:34 PM
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I think girls get it if both of their parents have the hemophilia gene, so their father would have to have hemophilia. They would have two X chromosones with the hemophilia gene. It's more common in boys because as girls have two X chromosones, if they get the hemophilia gene from their mother, the other X chromosone from their father 'counters' it. As boys only have one X chromosone, then if it carries the gene, they get hemophilia. It can't be passed from father to son for that same reason. Their mother isn't a carrier, and they get the Y chromosone from their father, which does not carry the hemophilia gene.
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  #171  
Old 04-30-2010, 06:50 AM
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Originally Posted by wbenson View Post
A hemophiliac father will always pass the gene to his daughter (and never to his son). It's possible for women to actually have the disease if they have a hemophiliac father and a mother who at least carried it. (And women who are carriers can have mild symptoms.)
In all the studies I have read and doctors consulted - this has never once been mentioned. Can you provide the source.
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  #172  
Old 04-30-2010, 08:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Melisende View Post
In all the studies I have read and doctors consulted - this has never once been mentioned. Can you provide the source.
If a male is afflicted with the disease and has children with a female who is not even a carrier, his daughters will be carriers of haemophilia. His sons, however, will not be affected with the disease. The disease is X-linked and the father cannot pass haemophilia through the Y chromosome. Males with the disorder are then no more likely to pass on the gene to their children than carrier females, though all daughters they sire will be carriers and all sons they father will not have haemophilia (unless the mother is a carrier).
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  #173  
Old 04-30-2010, 03:28 PM
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Originally Posted by lumutqueen View Post
If a male is afflicted with the disease and has children with a female who is not even a carrier, his daughters will be carriers of haemophilia. His sons, however, will not be affected with the disease. The disease is X-linked and the father cannot pass haemophilia through the Y chromosome. Males with the disorder are then no more likely to pass on the gene to their children than carrier females, though all daughters they sire will be carriers and all sons they father will not have haemophilia (unless the mother is a carrier).
Actually, they can, though it is rare. Here's the article.
Haemophilia A (Factor VIII Deficiency) | Doctor | Patient UK
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  #174  
Old 07-05-2012, 10:14 AM
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Porphyria facts about QV's descendants: Her daughter Vicki, who married the German prince, and Vicki's Charlotte both have been DNA tested (their bones) and proven to have porphyria, the form being Variegate Porphyria. Porphyria of this type is not recessive, that is, once it is not in a line, it is gone. It is dominant, so that 50% of children get it on one parent's line, and if two parents have it, 75% (on average, of course). The only way a person can be thought to be a carrier (unlike hemophilia) is if that person has the gene but it is not triggered into disease, which happens frequently.

QV probably got the disease from her father, the Duke of Kent, whose father George III had it. She could have gotten it from her mother, who was a first cousin of the Duke of Kent, if that princess had it, but no one has researched that issue, to my knowledge.

Her descendant of Gloucester (brother of the present Duke) was definitely dx'd with it.
The book stating that QV had no descendants with porphyria has been proven false. One source, The Purple Secret, a book by a scientist associated with those who disinterred the graves of Vicki and Charlotte, on whose bones the DNA was tested. One point should be made concerning relatives of Vicki and Charlotte: they were courageous and servants of humanity to allow this, as porphyria needs to be treated (it can be) rather than hidden. Avoidance of triggers is the main way to go to achieve remission.

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  #175  
Old 07-06-2012, 04:21 PM
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I understand the above post by Mariel1 was made in response to some earlier posts in this thread.
It has been copied over to the Porphyria in European Royalty thread where further discussion on the topic can be found.
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