The Royal Forums Coat of Arms

Go Back   The Royal Forums > Reigning Houses > British Royals > British Royal History

Join The Royal Forums Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
  #1  
Old 03-31-2008, 04:37 PM
HMTLove23's Avatar
Nobility
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: bethlehem, United States
Posts: 445
George I (1660-1727) and Sophia Dorothea of Celle (1666-1726)

George I (George Louis; 28 May 166011 June 1727)[1] was King of Great Britain and Ireland, from 1 August 1714 until his death. He was also a Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire.
Born in Germany, he eventually inherited control of a large swathe of Lower Saxony, and his domains expanded during his lifetime as the result of a succession of European wars. At the age of 54, he ascended the British throne as the first monarch of the House of Hanover. Though many aspirants to the throne bore a closer relationship to his predecessor, Queen Anne, his mother, Sophia, had been designated heir by the Act of Settlement 1701 because of her Protestant faith. Sophia predeceased Anne by a matter of weeks, leaving the Protestant succession to George. The Jacobites attempted to depose George and replace him with Anne's Catholic half-brother, James, but their attempts failed.
During George's reign in Britain, the powers of the monarchy diminished and the modern system of Cabinet government led by a Prime Minister underwent development. Towards the end of his reign, actual power was held by Sir Robert Walpole. George died on a trip to his native Hanover, where he was buried.

George I of Great Britain - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Marriage
The same year, George married his first cousin, Sophia Dorothea, thereby securing additional incomes that would have been outside Salic laws requiring male inheritance. The marriage of state was arranged primarily as it ensured a healthy annual income, and assisted the eventual unification of Hanover and Celle. Sophia was at first against the marriage, looking down on Sophia Dorothea's mother (who was not of royal birth) and concerned by Sophia Dorothea's legitimated status, but was eventually won over by the advantages inherent in the marriage.[7]
In 1683, George and his brother, Frederick Augustus, served in the Great Turkish War at the Battle of Vienna, and Sophia Dorothea bore George a son, George Augustus. The following year, Frederick Augustus was informed of the adoption of primogeniture, meaning he would no longer receive part of his father's territory as he had expected. It led to a breach between father and son, and between the brothers, that lasted until Frederick Augustus's death in battle in 1690. With the imminent formation of a single Hanoverian state, and the Hanoverians continuing contributions to the Empire's wars, Ernest Augustus was made an Elector of the Holy Roman Empire in 1692. George's prospects were now better than ever, as the sole heir to his father's Electorate and his uncle's duchy.[8]
Sophia Dorothea had a second child, a daughter named after her, in 1687 but there were no other pregnancies. The couple became estranged—George preferred the society of his mistress, Melusine von der Schulenburg, by whom he had two daughters in 1692 and 1693, respectively;[9] and Sophia Dorothea, meanwhile, had her own romance with the Swedish Count Philip Christoph von Königsmarck. Threatened with the scandal of an elopement, the Hanoverian court, including George's brothers and Sophia, urged the lovers to desist, but to no avail. According to diplomatic sources from Hanover's enemies, in July 1694, the count was killed, possibly with the connivance of George, and his body thrown into the river Leine weighted with stones. The murder was claimed to have been committed by four of Ernest Augustus's courtiers, one of whom (Don Nicolň Montalbano) was paid the enormous sum of 150,000 thalers, which was about one hundred times the annual salary of the highest-paid minister. Sources in Hanover itself, including Sophia, denied any knowledge of Königsmarck's whereabouts.[10]
George's marriage to Sophia Dorothea was dissolved, not on the grounds that either of them had committed adultery, but on the grounds that Sophia Dorothea had abandoned her husband. With the concurrence of her father, George had Sophia Dorothea imprisoned in the Castle of Ahlden in her native Celle. She was denied access to her children and father, forbidden to remarry and only allowed to walk unaccompanied within the castle courtyard. She was however endowed with an income, establishment and servants, and was allowed to ride in a carriage outside her castle, albeit under supervision.[11]
__________________

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 04-13-2009, 01:06 PM
Heir Presumptive
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Monterey, United States
Posts: 2,325
Very Interesting couple werent the Hanovers known to be very cold toward their Heirs and their wives especially in the case of George I
__________________

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-13-2009, 02:28 PM
Kotroman's Avatar
Nobility
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: -, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Posts: 463


Well, that theory could only be applied to George I and George IV. King George III was very kind to his wife, Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. In fact, no historian ever wrote that he cheated on her. King George II respected his wife, Caroline of Ansbach, and he was much influenced by her. King William IV isn't known to have been cold towards his wife, Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen, either. Not to mention how "cold" Queen Victoria was to her husband
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 04-14-2009, 02:17 AM
Grace Angel's Avatar
Nobility
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Iowa, United States
Posts: 462
I think the being cold to their heirs thing was true of George I, II, and III though. George IV only had Charlotte has heir and though not particularly fond of her I don't think, he wasn't fighting with her either. But George I, II, and III weren't that nice to their heirs ( in the case of George II, that was Frederick, Prince of Wales, father of George III).
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-30-2009, 07:54 PM
Gentry
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Waterford, Ireland
Posts: 53
George I

When he was a young man he visited London, and there was a rumour he was going to marry Princess Anne (later Queen Anne). I wonder if he had would she have had children that would have survived?
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-23-2009, 06:02 AM
RoyalistRiley's Avatar
Courtier
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 502
That would have been an interesting scenario - the troubles with the Jacobites would have been non-existant
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-24-2009, 01:22 PM
Grace Angel's Avatar
Nobility
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Iowa, United States
Posts: 462
There still might have been troubles with Jocobites because Anne was King James II's daughter, not son, and the Jacobites likely would still have felt that the claim of the descendents of James II's son, ( since males take place over females in sucession to the British throne), were superior to those of his daughter Anne and her descendents, and in addition, George I, although he did have a claim to to the English throne was a distant cousin, and his claim was not technically better than that of James II's male descendents. Children of George and Anne would not technically have had a better claim to the throne than the male descendents of James II in the eyes of the Jacobites.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 03-29-2010, 11:50 PM
Commoner
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Mississauga, Canada
Posts: 27
Didn't Sophia Dorothea have a lover that George had banished or killed? I vaguely remember reading something about it, but maybe I'm thinking of someone else.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 03-30-2010, 01:34 AM
Iluvbertie's Avatar
Majesty
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Bathurst, Australia
Posts: 8,350
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grace Angel View Post
There still might have been troubles with Jocobites because Anne was King James II's daughter, not son, and the Jacobites likely would still have felt that the claim of the descendents of James II's son, ( since males take place over females in sucession to the British throne), were superior to those of his daughter Anne and her descendents, and in addition, George I, although he did have a claim to to the English throne was a distant cousin, and his claim was not technically better than that of James II's male descendents. Children of George and Anne would not technically have had a better claim to the throne than the male descendents of James II in the eyes of the Jacobites.

There may have been some problems from the Jacobites but they would have had less support than they had as it would still have been James II's descendents on the throne. The Jacobites didn't cause a huge lot of trouble in the years from 1688 to 1714 when James' daughters were on the throne so it is conceivable that they might not have caused all that much trouble.

Had either Mary or Anne had a child, regardless of who the father was, there is a good chance that the Jacobites would have been ok (except the rabid Roman Catholics who wanted a RC monarch). The Scots wouldn't have been so upset as shown by the way they didn't really do a lot (yes there was opposition to Mary and Anne but not all that extensive) until 1714.

Although the Old Pretender was a minor through out most of this period his father had been kicked out and no one really kicked up a fuss over that.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 08-05-2011, 01:33 PM
Commoner
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: New York, United States
Posts: 10
how someone can shut off his children from their mother (and vice versa) is beyond me. was the need for revenge so great that he had to make his whole family suffer like that? did his children ever try to break in to the prison to see their mother?
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 08-06-2011, 12:10 AM
HM Queen Catherine's Avatar
Nobility
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Rendsburg, Germany
Posts: 303
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeLorean View Post
how someone can shut off his children from their mother (and vice versa) is beyond me. was the need for revenge so great that he had to make his whole family suffer like that? did his children ever try to break in to the prison to see their mother?
George I was a cruel man who had no tender feelings for his wife at all. Their marriage was arranged by his mother, who personally hated Sophia Dorothea, but the lure of her inheritance was too great to resist.

Sophia never wanted to marry George either, but was forced to do so by her parents, who saw the match as an advantage for their daughter whose legitimacy was questionable.

Their relationship was cold and unemotional from the beginning and both were very unhappy. After Sophia's "affair" was exposed, George divorced her and had her imprisoned, even though he had had affairs of his own for some time. No one really knows if Sophia actually consummated her relationship with Christoph von Königsmarck - that was the presumption at the time.

Most believe her children did not see her again after she was locked away.. and George II hated his father because of it. It was said that George I was furious with his daughter, the Queen of Prussia, when her court wore black mourning after Sophia Dorothea died.

George I only survived his ex-wife by four weeks.
__________________
Ú i vethed...nâ i onnad. Minlű pedich nin i aur hen telitha. - Arwen & Aragorn, The Lord of the Rings
(English translation: "This is not the end... it is the beginning. You told me once, this day would come.")
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 05-07-2012, 10:48 AM
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 200
There is a new book that was just published about George I's mistress Melusine von der Schulenburg "The Maypole."

The King’s Mistress by Claudia Gold (Book Review) | Carolyn Harris: Royal Historian
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 08-10-2012, 05:00 PM
MarkUK's Avatar
Commoner
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Stone, United Kingdom
Posts: 32
Is there a definitive list of people who had a better claim to the British Throne than George I when he succeeded in 1714? I've worked out a list of my own and have come up with 58 names ahead of him.
__________________
You're playing chess with Fate and Fate's winning.
Arnold Bennett
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 08-10-2012, 06:12 PM
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Toronto (ON) & London (UK), Canada
Posts: 5,261
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkUK View Post
Is there a definitive list of people who had a better claim to the British Throne than George I when he succeeded in 1714? I've worked out a list of my own and have come up with 58 names ahead of him.
Presumably those 58 were not non-Catholic descendents of George's mother The Electress Sophie of Hanover. All claimants to the throne must descend from her.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 08-10-2012, 06:29 PM
Artemisia's Avatar
Heir Presumptive
Royal Blogger
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Yerevan, Armenia
Posts: 5,425
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkUK View Post
Is there a definitive list of people who had a better claim to the British Throne than George I when he succeeded in 1714? I've worked out a list of my own and have come up with 58 names ahead of him.
Well, George I was the first in the Line of Succession based on the Act of Settlement.
However, if we assume the Act was never enforced, then the Line of Succession* to Queen Anne (including those otherwise excluded by the aforementioned Act) in 1714 would include the following people: **

1. James, Prince of Wales (The Old Pretender)
2. Anne Marie of Orleans (daughter of Henrietta of England, daughter of Charles I)
3. Victor Amadeus, Prince of Piedmont (son of Anne Marie of Orleans)
4. Charles Emmanuel III of Savoy (second son of Anne Marie of Orleans)
5. Prince Emanuele Philibert of Savoy (third son of Anne Marie of Orleans)
6. Elizabeth Charlotte of the Palatinate (daughter of Charles I Louis, Elector Palatine and granddaughter of Elizabeth Stuart - James I's elder daughter)
7. Philippe Charles of Orleans (the son of Elizabeth Charlotte of the Palatinate)
8. Louis d'Orléans (son of Philippe Charles of Orleans)
9. Marie Louise Elisabeth of Orleans (daughter of Philippe Charles of Orleans)
10. Louise Adelaide of Orleans (daughter of Philippe Charles of Orleans)
11. Charlotte Aglae of Orleans (daughter of Philippe Charles of Orleans)
12. Louise Elisabeth of Orleans (daughter of Philippe Charles of Orleans)
13. Elisabeth Charlotte of Orleans (daughter of Elizabeth Charlotte of the Palatinate)
14. Leopold Clement, Hereditary Prince of Lorraine (son of Elisabeth Charlotte of Orleans)
15. Francis I, Holy Roman Emperor (son of Elisabeth Charlotte of Orleans)
16. Charles Alexander of Lorraine (son of Elisabeth Charlotte of Orleans)
17. Elisabeth Therese of Lorraine (daughter of Elisabeth Charlotte of Orleans)
18. Anne Charlotte of Lorraine (daughter of Elisabeth Charlotte of Orleans)
19. Lady Frederica Schomberg (daughter of Caroline von der Pfalz, daughter of Karl I Ludwig von der Pfalz, son of Elizabeth Stuart - James I's daughter)
20. Lady Caroline Darcy (daughter of Lady Frederica Schomberg)
21. Lady Maria Schomberg (daughter of Caroline Elisabeth)
22. Louise von der Pfalz (daughter of Karl I Ludwig von der Pfalz, son of Elizabeth Stuart - James I's daughter)
23. Ludwig Otto of Salm (son of Luise Marie von Simmern, daughter of Edward, Count Palatine of Simmern, son of Elizabeth Stuart - James I's daughter)
24. Dorothea Franziska , Princess of Salm (daughter of Ludwig Otto of Salm)
25. Louise of Salm (daughter of Luise Marie von Simmern, daughter of Edward, Count Palatine of Simmern, son of Elizabeth Stuart - James I's daughter)
26. A son ofLouise of Salm
27. A daughter of Louise of Salm
28. Louise Apollonia (daughter of Luise Marie von Simmern)
29. Eleanor Christina (daughter of Luise Marie von Simmern)
30. Anne Henriette, Princess of Conde (daughter of Edward, Count Palatine of Simmern, son of Elizabeth Stuart - James I's daughter)
31. Louis Henri, Duke of Bourbon (son of Louis, Prince of Conde, the son of Anne Henriette, Princess of Conde)
32. Charles, Count of Charolais (son of Louis, Prince of Conde)
33. Louis, Count of Clermont (son of Louis, Prince of Conde)
34. Marie Anne de Bourbon, Mademoiselle de Conde (daughter of Louis, Prince of Conde)
35. Louise Elisabeth de Bourbon, Mademoiselle de Bourbon (daughter of Louis, Prince of Conde)
36. Louise Anne de Bourbon (daughter of Louis, Prince of Conde)
37. Marie Anne de Bourbon (daughter of Louis, Prince of Conde)
38. Henriette Louise de Bourbon (daughter of Louis, Prince of Conde)
39. Elisabeth Alexandrine de Bourbon (daughter of Louis, Prince of Conde)
40. Marie Therese de Bourbon (daughter of Anne Henriette, Princess of Conde)
41. Louis Armand de Bourbon (son of Marie Therese de Bourbon)
42. Marie Anne de Bourbon (daughter of Marie Therese de Bourbon)
43. Louise Adelaide de Bourbon (daughter of Marie Therese de Bourbon)
44. Louise Benedicte de Bourbon (daughter of Anne Henriette, Princess of Conde)
45. Louis Auguste de Bourbon, Prince of Dombes (son of Louise Benedicte de Bourbon)
46. Louis Charles de Bourbon, Count of Eu (son of Louise Benedicte de Bourbon)
47. Louise Francoise de Bourbon, Mademoiselle du Maine (daughter of Louise Benedicte de Bourbon)
48. Marie Anne de Bourbon (daughter of Anne Henriette, Princess of Conde)
49. Benedicta Henrietta (daughter of Edward, Count Palatine of Simmern)
50. Francesco d'Este (son of Duchess Charlotte of Brunswick-Luneburg, daughter of Benedicta Henrietta)
51. Gian Federico d'Este (son of Duchess Charlotte of Brunswick-Luneburg)
52. Benedetta Maria d'Este (daughter of Duchess Charlotte of Brunswick-Luneburg)
53. Amalia Giuseppina d'Este (daughter of Duchess Charlotte of Brunswick-Luneburg)
54. Enrichetta d'Este (daughter of Duchess Charlotte of Brunswick-Luneburg)
55. Henriette Maria of Brunswick-Luneburg (daughter of Edward, Count Palatine of Simmern)
56. Wilhelmine Amalia of Brunswick-Luneburg (daughter of Edward, Count Palatine of Simmern)
57. Maria Josepha of Austria (daughter of Wilhelmine Amalia of Brunswick-Luneburg)
58. Maria Amalia of Austria (daughter of Wilhelmine Amalia of Brunswick-Luneburg)
59. George I of Great Britain


* A Line of Succession based on male primogeniture, no ban on Catholics, or unequal marriages (which didn't exist in Britain anyway).
** All people are named by the titles and styles they were best known under, and not necessarily those they occupied at the time.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 08-10-2012, 07:16 PM
Iluvbertie's Avatar
Majesty
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Bathurst, Australia
Posts: 8,350
I remember watching one of the history shows that Prince Edward did and he said some figure in the high 50s but I can't remember what it was had a better blood claim than George I but they were all barred due to being RC or married to an RC.

Of course The Act of Settlement changed the succession from pure blood lines to put the religious criteria and descent from Sophia of Hannover.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 08-11-2012, 12:43 AM
Serene Highness
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Los Alamos, United States
Posts: 1,034
that is a really horrible story from beginning to end. The fact that there were over 50 people ahead of George I, who were Catholics, shows why there is a move to allow Catholics to marry heirs now. But it still not considered OK for a Catholic to rule. I wonder if it matters any more. There does not seem to be fighting between Protestants and Catholics at this time, as there was earlier in history. Anyway, it's a sorry tale how they had to bring in the Hanovers to settle a religious dispute. That was interesting that PRince Edward did a show on it.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 08-11-2012, 01:53 AM
Royal Highness
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: alpine village, Germany
Posts: 1,804
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artemisia View Post
Well, George I was the first in the Line of Succession based on the Act of Settlement.
However, if we assume the Act was never enforced, then the Line of Succession* to Queen Anne (including those otherwise excluded by the aforementioned Act) in 1714 would include the following people: **

1. James, Prince of Wales (The Old Pretender)
2. Anne Marie of Orleans (daughter of Henrietta of England, daughter of Charles I)
3. Victor Amadeus, Prince of Piedmont (son of Anne Marie of Orleans)

snip


15. Francis I, Holy Roman Emperor (son of Elisabeth Charlotte of Orleans)
Artemisia, it's good that you wrote "would include" as of course each and any Habsburg-Lothringen and any descendant of a Habsburg-Archduchess
would have inherited Francis I Stephan's claim, so they all would be in line of succession. Of course you only included those already living at the beginning of the 1700s but I find the "Habsburg"-Fact so very, very interesting!
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 08-11-2012, 08:21 AM
Artemisia's Avatar
Heir Presumptive
Royal Blogger
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Yerevan, Armenia
Posts: 5,425

I indeed included only those alive in 1714, at the time of Queen Anne's death.
I was actually more intrigued by the number of French Royals who would have occupy, under normal circumstances, quite high positions in the Line of Succession. I wonder if the Act of Union hadn't been signed (creating Great Britain as a single country), would there be a possibility of Personal Union of Crowns with France. And if yes, what would the consequences be? Although given the history between the two countries, such union would have been very unlikely.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 08-11-2012, 08:32 AM
MarkUK's Avatar
Commoner
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Stone, United Kingdom
Posts: 32
Your list tallies with mine in terms of names and numbers, but I've got some of them in a different order. Nevertheless 58 ahead of George of Hanover would appear to be the correct number. Amazing when you think about it, all because of religion.
__________________

__________________
You're playing chess with Fate and Fate's winning.
Arnold Bennett
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
act of settlement, biography, british history, george i, hanover, line of succession, queen consort, queen sophia dorothea


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Christian III & Dorothea norwegianne Danish Royal History 1 03-23-2014 05:37 PM
Princess Aimee Gives Birth to a Girl - Eliane Sophia Carolina; July 6, 2009 sgl Princess Margriet, Prof. van Vollenhoven and Family 73 03-29-2010 01:46 AM
Christian I and Dorothea of Brandenburg norwegianne Danish Royal History 1 11-11-2007 12:53 PM
Christoffer III af Bayern and Dorothea of Brandenburg norwegianne Danish Royal History 0 08-25-2006 12:13 PM
Spanish State Visit to Qatar; April 26-27, 2006 fanletizia Ruling Family of Qatar 16 04-28-2006 11:35 AM




Additional Links
Popular Tags
birth charlene chris o'neill crown prince frederik crown prince haakon crown princess letizia crown princess mary crown princess mette-marit crown princess victoria current events dutch royal history fashion grand duchess maria teresa grand duke henri hohenzollern infanta cristina infanta elena infanta leonor infanta sofia jordan king abdullah ii king carl xvi gustav king felipe king felipe vi king harald king juan carlos king philippe king willem-alexander luxembourg ottoman pom prince albert prince albert ii prince carl philip prince constantijn prince felipe prince floris prince joachim prince laurent prince pieter-christiaan princess princess alexia (2005 -) princess anita princess ariane princess beatrix princess catharina-amalia princess charlene princess claire princess elisabeth princess laurentien princess letizia princess mabel princess madeleine princess margriet princess marie princess mary princess of asturias queen letizia queen mathilde queen maxima queen paola queen rania queen silvia queen sofia royal russia spain state visit wedding william


Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

RV & Travel Trailer Communities

Our RV & Travel Trailer sites encompasses virtually all types of Recreational Vehicles, from brand-specific to general RV communities.

» More about our RV Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002-2012 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:48 AM.

Social Knowledge Networks

eXTReMe Tracker
Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2014
Jelsoft Enterprises

Royal News Delivered to your Email!

You can get the latest Royal News right in your inbox.

unsusbcribe at anytime with one click

Close [X]