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  #81  
Old 02-23-2012, 06:24 PM
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Monaco

Thank you for explaining that.
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  #82  
Old 02-23-2012, 06:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lenora
With the birth of Queen Victoria's baby girl, there is one more female heir to the throne.So, if we put the current reigning royal houses, the female primogeniture generally wins.Here I mean the future royals (as the equal law hasn't been adopted many years ago).But I wish to clarify some questions.
So, I believe all non-European reigning houses don't accept the female heirs. In this way, if I'm not mistaken , there are 10 European reigning monarchies, most of which have female heirs( and mainly equal primogeniture).
1.Britain ( we'll have to wait for the baby of Cambridges, but the equal law seems to be adopted);
2.Belgium ( female heir);
3.Denmark (male heir);
4.Holland (female heir);
5.Norway (female heir);
6.Sweden (female heir);
7.Spain ( I think Leonor will remain heir unless Letizia gives birth to a boy);
8.Monaco ( we'll have to wait);
9.Luxembourg ( we'll have to wait);
10.Liechtenstein ( here I have little knowledge).
In case of European houses I don't know the precise situation with Britain, Monaco and Lichtenstein. Has there been discussed or adopted the equal law?
First off, Queen Victoria? You mean Crown Princess. Equal Law in the UK has not been adopted only proposed and accepted by the 16 commonwealth nations. It will have to be written, examined and debated in 14 of the 16 countries and then pass through each parliament and receive Royal Assent this could take years and I doubt the governments are in any particular rush seeing as we have two Kings ready and waiting.

Also, just to point out Britain already has an heir for this generation of royals William. Charles fits into to the Victoria, Frederik, Haakon generation. A child of William's will be the first future heir for the next next generation.
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  #83  
Old 02-27-2012, 05:35 PM
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Originally Posted by titiromi View Post
Yes but Man outrank female so for it's male preference primogeniture
No it is not male primogeninture if there was no females would be in line it is just primogeniture which the eldest son of the reigning monarch is the first in line to the throne.The only way a female would get it no males.
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  #84  
Old 02-27-2012, 06:17 PM
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Well a female being allowed on the throne, is a great idea and could help like in the situation of Japan at the moment. The crownprince only has one daughter, but for some reason I have a male preference primogeniture. I have no idea why and I'm all for equal rights and yes I'm a woman. Perhaps because it had been the tradition in the past. But in my opinion if there are no men or he's unsuited the woman should take over.

Sorry but it's my preference for some reason. So I hope you can all understand that. Also I have no problem the way the things now are organised. Each country should do what is best for their own country and people.
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  #85  
Old 03-21-2012, 01:14 PM
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In Japan, Crown Prince has only one daughter and she is not in the line of the throne. Crown Prince's nephew is the only grandson of the King and he is in the 3rd line. I don't think they will change it because they have a male heir.
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  #86  
Old 03-21-2012, 01:14 PM
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And, what about Spain? Prince Felipe doesn't have a son. Is it needed?
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  #87  
Old 03-24-2012, 11:51 AM
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Will it be changed? The princes have heiresses nor heirs like felipe, willem Alexander and naruhito.
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  #88  
Old 03-24-2012, 03:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grandduchess24 View Post
Will it be changed? The princes have heiresses nor heirs like felipe, willem Alexander and naruhito.
In Japan, it's unlikely seeing as their is a male heir available and in such a traditional country there's no reason to change. The same goes for Spain but the other way round, there's no male heir and a girl being brought up as a future Queen.

As for The Netherlands it doesn't matter, the country has had equal primogenture since 1983.
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  #89  
Old 03-24-2012, 03:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imojeen View Post
And, what about Spain? Prince Felipe doesn't have a son. Is it needed?
Females can inherit the Throne, so unless Felipe and Letizia have a son, Leonor will one day become Queen Regnant of Spain.
If it transpires Letizia is pregnant with a boy, I am pretty certain equal primogeniture will be adopted very swiftly; back when Letizia was pregnant with her second daughter, they were quick to announce it was another girl to avoid unnecessary hassle.

As for Japan, the future of Japanese Monarchy effectively rests on the shoulders of a young boy because he is the only male (of his generation) within not only the Emperor's immediate, but also extended family. It is likely some changes will be adopted, possibly granting females right to inherit in total absence of male heirs among all dynasts.
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  #90  
Old 04-02-2012, 06:26 PM
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Liechtenstein is male-only succession I believe or they have a complicated system where if they run out of direct male line descendants, they find a male of the most senior female line of descent or something. I may have muddled that with the previous system in use in Luxembourg prior to the adoption of equal primogeniture.

I'm a pragmatist with regard to succession. The most important thing is the continuity of the institution and to a certain extent, who gets to be monarch has always been influenced by the circumstances in a country and the values of the time as well as the people's consent. In Europe, absolute primogeniture reflects how society has evolved. It's also interesting to note that countries which adopted equal primogeniture the earliest (Norway, Sweden, Belgium) previously had Salic Law (excepting the Netherlands). I assume this is also partially due to the shortage of heirs as well as foresight of where things are going in terms of gender equality. Denmark, which had male preference primogeniture only very recently changed the law. I understand that the UK and Spain don't see it as a political priority because of the legislative hassle it would cause when there are so many other things going on domestically and internationally.
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  #91  
Old 04-02-2012, 06:59 PM
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Liechtenstein's succession is agnatic primogeniture which excludes all females. The succession is based on Article 12 of the House Law of the Liechtensteiner Princely Family. The line of the succession is limited to the direct agnatic (male-line) descendants of Prince Johann I of Liechtenstein.
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  #92  
Old 05-15-2012, 10:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Esmerelda View Post
In Europe, absolute primogeniture reflects how society has evolved. It's also interesting to note that countries which adopted equal primogeniture the earliest (Norway, Sweden, Belgium) previously had Salic Law (excepting the Netherlands). ... Denmark, which had male preference primogeniture only very recently changed the law.
Salic Law was not adopted in Sweden until 1810 (Bernadotte family chosen as kings), changed to absolute primogeniture in 1980.
In Denmark Salic Law was adopted in 1853 (Glücksburg branch chosen as kings), which was changed in 1953 to male-preference primogeniture to allow princess Margarethe to become heir. In 2009 it was changed to absolute primogeniture.
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  #93  
Old 10-16-2012, 04:47 AM
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The heirs to the thrones of Europe are well known, but who is next in line? The modernization of succession laws will result in the first female dominated generation of heirs. Below we outline the next-in-line children, the heirs that stand before them, and the succession laws.
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  #94  
Old 10-24-2012, 05:21 PM
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Succession

I'm very interested in Asian and European royal succession and how it works, and the requirements to not be considered "morganic" in some countries. Both disposed and non-disposed succession laws are acceptable, although I'm more interested in the disposed royal families succession laws more. Links would be helpful, if that's alright.
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  #95  
Old 10-25-2012, 01:33 PM
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Something I've read ( don't remember where?) that there are 7 Malaysian families and each take turns to rule. So if the head of family 1 is king now after his demise his descendant doesn't inherit the throne but the head of family 2 does.
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  #96  
Old 10-25-2012, 01:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Princess B View Post
Something I've read ( don't remember where?) that there are 7 Malaysian families and each take turns to rule. So if the head of family 1 is king now after his demise his descendant doesn't inherit the throne but the head of family 2 does.
The 'King' or Yang di-Pertuan Agong is elected for a five-year term by and from among the nine Rulers of the Malay states. The 'King' cannot be re-elected again until all other 8 rules have served a term.

Quote:
I'm very interested in Asian and European royal succession and how it works, and the requirements to not be considered "morganic" in some countries. Both disposed and non-disposed succession laws are acceptable, although I'm more interested in the disposed royal families succession laws more. Links would be helpful, if that's alright.
Almost every section on this website contains a thread about the individual countries succession laws.

There are various succession laws see here. Each country has different laws, such as in the UK the succession is dictated by male primogeniture and not equal such as in Denmark, Norway, Sweden etc.
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  #97  
Old 03-25-2015, 09:36 PM
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Royal people always used to make their own rules and they used to live their life as a Royal because at the stage they have to maintain things in all aspects.
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  #98  
Old 07-06-2015, 09:34 AM
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Originally Posted by betina View Post
Norway = Full Linear Succession
Belgium = Full Linear Succession
Holland = Full Linear Succession
Here is a summary of succession rules in different European monarchies.


1) United Kingdom and Commonwealth Realms

Eligibility to the throne: legitimate Protestant descendants of Sophia, Electress of Hanover. In addition, the monarch must be in communion with the established (Anglican Episcopal) Church of England.

Order of Succession: equal primogeniture for persons born after October 28, 2011; otherwise, male-preference cognatic primogeniture.

Grounds for exclusion from the line of succession: conversion to the Roman Catholic faith (previously, also marriage to Catholics); entering into marriage without the consent of the monarch declared in Council (note: the latter rule applies only to the first six persons in line to the throne and the exclusion extends to all legitimate descendants of the marriage).

Minimum age to assume the royal prerogative: 18; until then, the royal prerogative is exercised by a regent who must be the next person in the line of succession who is of "full age", is a British subject domiciled in the United Kingdom, and is not disqualified from succeeding to the Crown.

Vacancy of the throne: ?

2) Kingdom of the Netherlands

Eligibility to the throne: legitimate descendants of King Willem I, Prince of Orange-Nassau, who are not removed from the current monarch by more than three degrees of consanguinity (i.e. children, grandchildren, siblings, nephews/nieces, aunts/uncles, and, if any, great-grandchildren of the monarch).

Order of Succession: equal primogeniture.

Grounds for exclusion from the line of succession: entering into marriage without the consent of the Dutch parliament given in the form of a law passed by both houses of parliament in a joint session (note: the exclusion in that case extends to any children born of that marriage and their issue). Exceptionally, one or more individual persons may be also excluded from the hereditary succession by Act of Parliament if exceptional circumstances require and such exclusion is approved by two-thirds of the votes cast in a joint session of the two houses of parliament.

Minimum age to assume the royal prerogative: 18 ; until then, the royal prerogative is exercised by a regent appointed by an act of parliament passed in a joint session of the two houses.

Vacancy of the throne: if there is no person qualified to succeed, the current monarch may propose his successor in the form of a bill introduced in parliament. The two houses of parliament are subsequently dissolved and the newly convened houses meet in joint session in order to decide on the bill. The bill is accepted only if at least two-thirds of the votes cast are in favor.

3) Kingdom of Sweden

Eligibility to the throne: currently, only legitimate descendants of King Carl XVI Gustaf. In addition, the monarch must be a member of the (Evangelical Lutheran) Church of Sweden.

Order of Succession: equal primogeniture.

Grounds for exclusion from the line of succession (extending to the excluded person's descendants): entering into marriage without the consent of the Swedish government given upon application by the monarch; becoming the head of state or government of a foreign country without the consent of the monarch and the parliament of Sweden; not being a member of the (Evangelical Lutheran) Church of Sweden; and not being raised in Sweden.

Minimum age to assume the royal prerogative: 18 ; until then, the royal prerogative is exercised by a regent appointed by the parliament of Sweden.

Vacancy of the throne: if the Royal House becomes extinct, the parliament of Sweden elects a regent to perform the duties of Head of State until further notice; parliament is no longer required though to elect a new royal house to replace the former one upon its extinction.

4) Kingdom of Norway


Eligibility to the throne: legitimate descendants of the current monarch; siblings of the current monarch; and legitimate descendants of siblings of the current monarch. In addition, the monarch must profess the Evangelical Lutheran religion.

Order of Succession: agnatic primogeniture for persons born before 1971; male-preference cognatic primogeniture for persons born between 1971 and 1989; equal primogeniture for persons born in or after 1990.

Grounds for exclusion from the line of succession (extending to all descendants): entering into marriage without the consent of the monarch; becoming the head of state or government of a foreign country without the consent of the monarch and two-thirds of the members of the Norwegian parliament.

Minimum age to assume the royal prerogative: 18 (?); if the monarch is under age, the Council of State summons the parliament to make provisions for the government of the kingdom during his/her minority.
Vacancy of the throne: f there is no prince or princess entitled to the succession, the monarch may propose his/her successor to parliament, which has the right to make the choice if the King's proposal is not accepted. If the Royal Line has become extinct and no successor to the throne has been previously designated, then a new Queen or King must be necessarily chosen by parliament . Meanwhile, the royal prerogative is exercised temporarily by the Council of State.

5) Kingdom of Spain

Eligibility to the throne: currently, only legitimate descendants of King Juan Carlos I of Borbon.

Order of Succession: male-preference cognatic primogeniture.

Grounds for exclusion from the line of succession: entering into marriage against the explicit prohibition of the monarch and the Spanish parliament. Voluntary renunciations of succession rights are possible only if ratified by organic law.

Minimum age to assume the royal prerogative: 18 (?) ; until then, the surviving mother or father, or relative of legal age who is nearest in line to the throne immediately assumes the office of Regent. If there is no person who can exercise the regency, a council of regents is appointed by the parliament consisting of one, three, or five persons.

Vacancy of the throne: if there are no legally qualified persons to ascend the throne, the parliament shall provide for the succession to the Crown in a manner which, according to the constitution, must be "the best for the interests of Spain".

6) Kingdom of Denmark

Eligibility to the throne: legitimate descendants of King Christian X and Queen Alexandrine. In addition, the monarch must belong to the established (Evangelical Lutheran) Church of Denmark.

Order of Succession: male-preference cognatic primogeniture for persons born before June 2009 (?); equal primogeniture for persons born after June 2009.

Grounds for exclusion from the line of succession: entering into marriage without the consent of the monarch expressed in a Council of State; when consenting to the marriage, the monarch can impose conditions that must be met in order for any resulting offspring to have succession rights (e.g. being raised in Denmark).

Minimum age to assume the royal prerogative: 18; provisions relating to the exercising of sovereign power in the event of the minority of the King shall be laid down by Statute.

Vacancy of the throne: if, on the vacancy of the throne, there is no qualified successor, the parliament of Denmark shall elect a monarch and establish the future order of succession to the throne.

7) Kingdom of Belgium

Eligibility to the throne: legitimate descendants of King Leopold I of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha.

Order of Succession: equal primogeniture for descendants of King Albert II; otherwise, agnatic primogeniture.

Grounds for exclusion from the line of succession: entering into marriage without the consent of the monarch expressed by royal decree (hence, with ministerial countersignature). The exclusion may be reversed though by the monarch with the approval of the two houses of the federal parliament.

Minimum age to assume the royal prerogative: 18 ; until then, the royal prerogative is exercised by a regent appointed by the federal parliament in a joint session of the two houses.

Vacancy of the throne: if there is no person available to succeed, the monarch may name his/her successor with the approval of both houses of the federal parliament, which can only adopt a resolution to that effect if two-thirds of their members are present and upon a two-third majority vote. If the throne is vacant, the two houses meeting in joint session to provide for a temporary regency; following an election, the two newly convened houses meet again in a joint session to provide permanent cover for the vacancy.
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  #99  
Old 07-06-2015, 10:08 AM
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In short: all modern monarchies have a limited line of succession. The British one (which else?) is unique with tousands and thousands of heirs.

The number of heirs of the following monarchies:

Japan - 5 heirs
Morocco - 5 heirs
Sweden - 6 heirs
Norway - 7 heirs
The Netherlands - 8 heirs
Spain - 10 heirs
Denmark - 12 heirs
Luxembourg - 12 heirs
Monaco - 12 heirs
Belgium - 14 heirs
Jordan - 24 heirs
Liechtenstein - 53 heirs
The United Kingdom - around 5000 heirs
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  #100  
Old 07-06-2015, 10:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Duc_et_Pair View Post
In short: all modern monarchies have a limited line of succession. The British one (which else?) is unique with tousands and thousands of heirs.

The number of heirs of the following monarchies:

Japan - 5 heirs
Morocco - 5 heirs
Sweden - 6 heirs
Norway - 7 heirs
The Netherlands - 8 heirs
Spain - 10 heirs
Denmark - 12 heirs
Luxembourg - 12 heirs
Monaco - 12 heirs
Belgium - 14 heirs
Jordan - 24 heirs
Liechtenstein - 53 heirs
The United Kingdom - around 5000 heirs

The Netherlands and Norway have an explicit limitation to the number of potential successors based on proximity of blood to the current monarch, which prevents the line of succession from growing over time. No such explicit limitation exists, however, in the case of Spain, Sweden, Belgium or Denmark. Over time then, unless new rules are introduced, the line of succession in those latter countries will keep growing exponentially.

I suppose the royal family could, however, self-limit the order of succession if all persons in more distant collateral lines got married without asking for royal approval, as I believe Prince Amedeo of Belgium did, therefore excluding himself and all his future children and their respective descendants.
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