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  #21  
Old 06-07-2009, 07:17 PM
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Originally Posted by lumutqueen View Post
Thats terrible; was there a reason why?
And may I ask enquire as to why we should no include those executed that is still murder? And which commoners have been included?

This is shaping up to be a wonderful read.
This is a very interesting thread indeed.
Elizabeth's death will be hard to explain in a few words, so I hope you will be patient and read this long one. :)

Elizabeth's husband died when their elder daughter Mary was only 10 years old, thus leaving Elizabeth Regent of the Kingdom. It was expected that Mary would eventually become Queen of both Hungary and Poland. Elizabeth arranged Mary's marriage to Sigismund of Luxemburg (at the time of the marriage in 1385, Mary was 13 and Sigismund was 15). The Polish, however, banished Sigismund from Poland. The Polish noblemen were also very unhappy with the prospect of union with Hungary, so they chose Mary's younger sister, Jadwiga as their Queen (Jadwiga was 9 at the time, but despite this, the Polish nobles strongly opposed to Elizabeth's regency in Poland, and it was discontinued there and Jadwiga was forced to leave for Poland without her mother or friends).

Elizabeth de-facto ruled Hungary to deep dissatisfaction of Sigismund, his brother, Wenceslaus IV of Bohemia, as well as many Hungarian noblemen. Sigismund and Wenceslaus actively plotted against Elizabeth, however the strategy backfired when the nobles invited Mary's second cousin, Charles of Naples to reign over them. Elizabeth was unprepared for such turn of events and wasn't able to resist at first andwas even forced to attend the Coronation, along with Mary and Sigismund. However, once the first shock was over, she arranged Charles's assassination.

Soon after the assassination, Elizabeth and Mary were captured by a powerful Hungarian noble family of Horvats. Although it was maintained at the time that the Horvat brothers acted of their own will, it is almost certain that the women were captured on Sigismund's orders. Despite his young age (he was barely 17 at the time), he wanted to rule the Kingdom himself and thus deeply resented Elizabeth's Regency. Elizabeth's cousin and adoptive brother Trvtko I of Bosnia posed an ultimatum to Horvats and Sigismund, threatening to revenge if both his sister and niece weren't released immediately. However, Elizabeth was strangled right in front of her daughter. Shocked by the news and true to his word, Trvkto quickly gathered troops to release at least his niece. Although his efforts were met with considerable opposition (not on the battlefield but on the diplomatic field), he did eventually rescue Mary from captivity.

When Mary met Sigismund for the first time after the rescue, she publically accused him of a matricide. Unable to get a divorce, she nevertheless refused to live with Sigismund and kept a separate household. Sigismund forced Mary to proclaim him her co-ruler and without Elizabeth to protect her daughter’s interests, he basically held all the powers.
Mary desperately wanted to find out the truth of her mother's murder and to punish the culprit (strongly believing it was Sigismund, she hoped that evidence supporting his involvement would enable her to divorce or even execute him). She therefore went as far as forgiving the Horvat brothers and granting them estates, on condition that they would tell who ordered her mother's murder. Before they could talk, however, they were killed by Sigismund's men; he justified his actions, stating it was a revenge for Elizabeth's murder.

Mary then tried to make sure that if something happened to her, Sigismund didn't remain the ruler, or at least the sole ruler of Hungary. She appointed her beloved uncle Trvtko as her Heir, should she die childless. However Trvkto died 3 years later (he was most probably murdered and it is alleged that Sigismund was involved with the murder). Four years after Trvkto's death, Mary died as well, under very suspicious circumstances. She was heavily pregnant at the time of her death and suffered a fall from the horse; eyewitnesses testified that her horse was deliberately frightened and a lot of people believed that Sigismund had arranged her murder (and scholars are inclined to agree with the version). She had no surviving children, so Sigismund became a sole ruler. Since Sigismund ruled in his wife’s right, his claims to the Hungarian Throne were shaky at the very best. He thus married Mary's cousin Barbara of Celje; Barbara was the granddaughter of Katarina Kotromanic, who was the cousin and adopted sister of Mary's mother, Elizabeth of Bosnia, Tvrtko I was her first cousin (incidentally, Barbara's cousin and adopted sister Anna married Wladyslaw, King of Poland, who was the widower of Jadwiga of Poland, Mary's sister).
Barbara’s descendants would later become Kings and Queens (some Regnant, some Consorts) of Poland, Hungary and Bohemia. Among her descendants were Charles I of Great Britain (through his mother, Anne of Denmark, who was Barbara's direct descendant) and Nicholas II of Russia. She is also a direct ancestor of both Diana, Princess of Wales and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall and thus future direct ancestor of the British Monarch.
Sigismund was later elected Holy Roman Emperor, King of Bohemia, Lombardia and Germany.


This posts adds several more murdered Royals to the list:
Charles II of Naples - murdered on Elizabeth of Bosnia's orders
Trvtko I of Bosnia - most probably, murdered on Sigismund's orders
Mary of Hungary - Murdered (allegedly) on Sigismund's orders while heavily pregnant
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  #22  
Old 06-08-2009, 07:21 AM
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The parents of HM Queen Margarita of Bulgaria was murdered in 1936 by loyalists.
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  #23  
Old 06-08-2009, 08:45 AM
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King Alexander and Queen Draga of Serbia, in 1903
Prince Mihailo of Serbia, in 1868
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  #24  
Old 06-08-2009, 09:47 AM
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Hi,

My goodness, Sigismund sounds like a real nasty piece of business....
And, the rest don't appear to be much better; but I guess, these were the times and one had to be alert and even cruel to survive.
"To the victor, go the spoils"....

Thank you Marsel77, for this education - I had never heard of these people before...
Someone should make a movie or mini-series about them and tie them in with the current Royals of Europe!!

Larry
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  #25  
Old 06-08-2009, 02:25 PM
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My pleasure, Larry and lumutqueen.

Quote:
My goodness, Sigismund sounds like a real nasty piece of business....
And, the rest don't appear to be much better; but I guess, these were the times and one had to be alert and even cruel to survive.
"To the victor, go the spoils"....

Someone should make a movie or mini-series about them and tie them in with the current Royals of Europe!!
Sigisumnd was a more or less typical ruler for his time, everyone involved in the story weren't exactly likeable personalities, with the possible exception of Tvrtko of Bosnia, who is generally regarded as a gentle and kind man. Sigisumnd was certainly a very successful, although ruthless ruler. But he was hardly worse then any of Europe's Monarchs even of later times.

I agree that a mini-series about their lives would have been a very entertaining and interesting watch.
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  #26  
Old 06-08-2009, 02:35 PM
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Hi again Marsel77,

Yes, I agree with you 100%...

Sigismund was no better nor no worse than many of the rulers of history; it makes for an interesting read!!!

May I suggest that you bring other such stories to light on this board or perhaps a book about 'unknown infamous personages'... You write very well and very clearly - a true education for us all....
I can see a talent there for clear, concise literature.... Really....

Hoping to read more!

Larry
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  #27  
Old 06-09-2009, 06:09 AM
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although I know everyone can look it up for themselves for convenience and because they were such remarkable women:

Marie-Louise, princesse de Lamballe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Princess_Mafalda_of_Savoy

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Boris III of Bulgaria 1943
Mafalda of Savoy, princess of Hesse 1944

Luise of Savoy, princess de Lamballe 1789/90
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  #28  
Old 06-09-2009, 06:20 AM
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Now that article on the princesse de Lamballe indeed gives little room for imagination. I believe they paraed her head on a spike in front of the window of Marie Antoinette's prison.

The November 2008 newsletter had a couple of stories on plots to murder royalty:

Quote:
Assassination of Prince William I of Orange


When the Dutch revolt against Spanish rule escalated as a result of the appointment of the Duke of Alva in 1567, Prince William I of Orange, stadholder of Holland and Zeeland, quickly became the natural leader of the revolt. He converted to Protestantism and since 1572 King Philip II of Spain was involved in, or was informed about various plots to kill his enemy. On March 18 of 1582, the Spaniard Juan de Jáuregui attempted to assassinate William in Antwerp. William survived this plot thanks to the dedicated care given to him by his sister Maria and his third wife, Charlotte de Bourbon. Although William recovered, the stress had taken its toll of Charlotte, and she died on 5 May.

A year later William married for the fourth time; his bride was Louise de Coligny, daughter of Admiral Gaspard de Coligny, the leader of the French Calvinist Hugenots. In the meantime, the luck of the Dutch revolt changed for the worse, with several cities returning to Spanish rule; on 22 June 1583 William had to leave Antwerp and settled in Delft.

It was on 10 July 1584 that William of Orange would be murdered in Delft by the Catholic Frenchman Balthasar Gérard. In 1581 Gérard found out that King Philip II had declared William an outlaw and promised a reward of 25,000 crowns for his assassination, so he decided to travel to The Netherlands and kill the prince. He served in the army of the Governor of Luxembourg in the hope that his path and William's would cross. When this ploy was unsuccessful, he left the army and went to Brussels, where he explained his plans to the Governor of the Netherlands, Alessandro Farnese, the Duke of Parma; the Duke, however, was unimpressed. In May 1584, Gérard introduced himself to William as a French nobleman who would like to work for the Dutch cause. He was sent on a mission to France to confer with William's French allies. With the money he made during the trip, he bought two pistols. On his return to Delft in July, he went to the Prinsenhof, where William resided. Louise de Coligny expressed her doubts about Gérard but William agreed to speak with him after his lunch with Rombertus Uylenburgh, the Mayor of Leeuwarden (and the father of Rembrant's wife Saskia). When William left the dining room and started to go downstairs, Gérard was waiting for him on the stairs and shot him in the chest. The prince - the first head of state to be killed by a handgun - fell to the floor, uttering his last words: ‘Mon Dieu, ayez pitié de mon âme; mon Dieu, ayez pitié de ce pauvre peuple.’ (My God, have pity on my soul; my God, have pity on this poor people).

Gérard in the meantime had fled from the scene of the murder. He ran towards the city walls in an attempt to escape from the city. When he tried to climb the wall, he was caught by the soldiers and servants of the Prince of Orange and imprisoned. Much to his frustration, he was not told whether the assassination had been successful. The city magistrates conducted a preliminary hearing and quickly decided that he should be tortured in order to divulge information. The first night he was beaten with birch rods, his wounds were covered with honey, and a goat was brought in to lick the honey and tear it away with its rough tongue, in the process also pulling the skin from Gérard's body. Luckily for Gérard, the goat did not touch him. For the rest of the night Gérard was left hanging on the wall with 150-lb stones tied to his big toes. He still did not say enough, so the next day he was given shoes that were too small and made of wet dog leather; he was left in front of a fire so the shoes would shrink and burn his feet. His torturers put some torches under his armpits and inserted needles and nails under his fingernails. In the end they sent for the executioner from Utrecht, Jacob Michielsz, who finally got Gérard to confess that Alessandro Farnese was involved in the plot.


On 13 July Gérard was tried and convicted. The court decided that he had to be made an example and undergo an extremely horrible execution. First his right hand, with which he had pulled the trigger, was burned off with red-hot iron pincers. Then the flesh on various parts of his body was torn off with the same pincers. After that he was quartered alive, and his heart was cut out of his body and thrown in his face. Finally, he was beheaded. The four parts of his body were put on display at the four city gates. His head was put on a pike and placed near the house of the dead prince.

The Netherlands finally became independent of Spain in the mid-17th century, a year after the end of the reign of Frederick Henry, William's son by his fourth wife, Louise.
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  #29  
Old 06-09-2009, 07:04 AM
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And another one: Louis Antoine Henri de Bourbon-Condé, duke of Enghien. He was the last in the line of Bourbon-Condé princes. Napoleon Bonaparte was widely blamed for his death.

From this wikipedia article:

Quote:
Early in 1804, Napoleon Bonaparte, then First Consul of France, heard news which seemed to connect the young duke with the Cadoudal-Pichegru conspiracy then being tracked by the French police. The news ran that the duke was in company with Charles François Dumouriez and had made secret journeys into France. This was false; the acquaintance was Thumry, a harmless old man, and the duke had no dealings with either Cadoudal or Pichegru. Napoleon gave orders for the seizure of the duke. French dragoons crossed the Rhine secretly, surrounded his house and brought him to Strasbourg (15 March 1804), and thence to the Château de Vincennes, near Paris. There a military commission of French colonels presided by General Hulin was hastily convened to try him.
Meanwhile, Bonaparte had found out the true facts of the case, and the accusations were hastily changed. The duke was now charged chiefly with bearing arms against France in the late war, and with intending to take part in the new coalition then proposed against France — these latter charges were more accurate than the original ones; the argument is whether or not his actions were sufficiently severe to merit execution. Claims that he presented a threat to the life of the First Consul are probably exaggerated. The military commission hastily and most informally drew up the act of condemnation, being incited thereto by orders from Anne Jean Marie René Savary, who had come charged with instructions. Savary intervened to prevent any chance of an interview between the condemned and the First Consul, and, on 21 March, the duke was shot in the moat of the castle, near a grave which had already been prepared.
Apparently Josephine begged Napoleon to change his mind and later either Fouché of Boulay have said: 'it was worse than a crime, it was a mistake'.

------
A very interesting and more elaborate article can be found here.
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  #30  
Old 06-09-2009, 02:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vecchiolarry View Post
Hi again Marsel77,

Yes, I agree with you 100%...

Sigismund was no better nor no worse than many of the rulers of history; it makes for an interesting read!!!

May I suggest that you bring other such stories to light on this board or perhaps a book about 'unknown infamous personages'... You write very well and very clearly - a true education for us all....
I can see a talent there for clear, concise literature.... Really....

Hoping to read more!

Larry
Thank you very much indeed, Larry.
I will do my best to find more 'unknown infamous personages' for this thread, ones that will be interesting read for everyone.

Quote:
Originally Posted by susan alicia
although I know everyone can look it up for themselves for convenience and because they were such remarkable women:

Marie-Louise, princesse de Lamballe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Princess Mafalda of Savoy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The murder of Princess de Lamballe is one of the darkest stains of the French revolution, compared only to the murder of Nicholas II and his family. Princess de Lamballe had never done anything bad to anyone, was a gentle and kind person, who only decided to stay in France because of her devotion to the Queen. I find her brutal murder even more shocking than the execution of Marie-Antoinette or Princess Elizabeth (Louis XVI's sister).

They did parade poor Marie-Louise's head in front of the balcony of the prison Marie-Antoinette and her family were kept. The mob were laughing and warning the 'Austrian Princess' that she would have similar ending as well.
It is said that the Queen fainted at the side of her most faithful friend's head.
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  #31  
Old 06-11-2009, 06:23 PM
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Thats terrible; was there a reason why?
Marsell gave you a great explanation. In a nutshell, Elizabeth of Bosnia was a victim of political conspiracy. I am not sure if anyone mentioned it, but Elizabeth was strangled before her 16-year-old daughter's eyes.

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Originally Posted by lumutqueen View Post
And may I ask enquire as to why we should no include those executed that is still murder? And which commoners have been included?
We shouldn't discuss the executed ones because execution is not the same as murder. For example, we shouldn't discuss about the death of Mary I of Scotland because she was not murdered. No commoner has been mentioned so far, I was just reminding all of us. We wouldn't this thread to go off topic
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  #32  
Old 06-11-2009, 06:36 PM
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I had read your post Marsel, last week but for some strange reason I have not thanked you for it. That was a wonderful explanation and I am glad you took the time to write it

It's strange how i used to think that royals to me seemed "untouchable" yet here we are dicussing royals that have been murdered.
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  #33  
Old 06-11-2009, 09:03 PM
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I am glad it helped you, lumutqueen.

I have long since come to the conclusion that the 'job' of a Royal is one of the most dangerous professions in the world. Not a minute of quiet life!
They were constantly in fear of being poisoned, stabbed, imprisoned, executed, invaded, producing (or disposing of) an Heir before, and now they have even more terrible enemy: the press, freedom of speech and very sharp photo lenses.
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  #34  
Old 06-11-2009, 09:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Marsel77 View Post
I have long since come to the conclusion that the 'job' of a Royal is one of the most dangerous professions in the world. Not a minute of quiet life!

They were constantly in fear of being poisoned, stabbed, imprisoned, executed, invaded, producing (or disposing of) an Heir before, and now they have even more terrible enemy: the press, freedom of speech and very sharp photo lenses.
And even worse: it's a job you're born to, for many of them, not something they were able to choose or reject.
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Old 06-12-2009, 03:19 AM
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Maximillian I of Mexico was a member of the Habsburg House who served with distinction in the Navy and as Viceroy of Lombardy and Venetia. In 1859, Napoleon III and Mexican monarchists offered him the crown to be the Emperor of Mexico. After some reluctance, he renounced his Habsburg titles and became Emperor. His brief reign was full of repeated attempts to reform the country but eventually lot financial and military backing from the French Government and was eventually overthrown in 1867, before being executed by republican forces. His last words were said to have been "Mexicans! Today I die for a fair cause: the freedom and independence of Mexico. May God allow my spilling blood to put an end forever to the disgraces of my new homeland. ¡Viva México!"

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  #36  
Old 06-12-2009, 12:50 PM
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To be more precise, those murdered in Sarajevo in 1918 were not Archduke and Archduchess of Austria-Hungary, but rather HI&RH Archduke Francis Ferdinand of Austria, Prince of Hungary, the heir to the Habsburg thrones, and his wife, HH the Duchess of Hohenberg. The Archduke's wife was born a countess, so their marriage was morganatic and Sophie was never Archduchess of Austria. Though I'm sure you already know this...
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Old 06-12-2009, 09:43 PM
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I see we haven't had any Swedish royals mentioned. Well, there's king Erik XIV (1533-1577), who was dethrowned by his half-brothers Johan and Karl (who both later became kings as well). He was put in prison, and according to an old tradition, he died there after he had eaten poisoned pea soup.

And there's also King Gustav III (1746-1792), who was shot at a custome party and later died from the injuries.
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Old 06-21-2009, 07:15 AM
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was Queen Astrid of Belgium murdered?
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Old 06-21-2009, 08:31 AM
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No, she died in a car accident in Switzerland, near Kussnacht, in 1935.
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  #40  
Old 06-21-2009, 01:14 PM
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Royals murdered

Prince Arthur, nephew of King John of England was also murdered.
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