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  #21  
Old 12-21-2005, 04:02 PM
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Lahore Fort - Details

Pictures from APL, Alamy, and Archnet
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  #22  
Old 12-21-2005, 04:49 PM
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Lahore Fort - Naulakha Pavillion

The Naulakha pavilion is a marble building located at the Sheesh Mahal courtyard, which is itself located at the Lahore Fort in Lahore, Pakistan. Its western face provides a panoramic view of the ancient city of Lahore. When it was built in 1631 A.D. by the Mughal emperor Shahjahan, it cost Rs.900,000, an exorbitant amount at the time. It is called Naulakha because that word in Urdu means 'worth 9 lakhs' (one lakh equals 100,000).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naulakha_pavilion

Pictures from Alamy and wikipedia:


This isn't related to the topic but I found this at wikipedia and just loved it! Looks like historic Mughal architecture continues to inspire:

The Pakistani embassy in Washington D.C. is modelled on the Naulakha pavilion. (Wikipedia)
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  #23  
Old 12-21-2005, 05:03 PM
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Lahore Fort - "Sheesh Mahal"

The Sheesh Mahal (شيش محل), literally "Palace of Mirrors", is one of the most lavish rooms within the Lahore Fort (in present-day Pakistan). The walls and ceiling are covered with small pieces of colored mirror. The Sheesh Mahal was constructed by the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan in 1631.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sheesh_Mahal

Pictures from APL, Oriental architecture, Alamy & wikipedia:
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  #24  
Old 12-21-2005, 11:22 PM
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Those pictures are breath taking, thanks Humera! :)

Warren, I have the first of those books. Many books in my collection are from tag sales or obscure New England used book stores where people sell their old books to the store and are re-sold again. One of my favorites is an oversize book I have I think called desert kingdom that contains 19th and early 20th century photos of one of the Indian Kingdoms during the British Raj times.
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  #25  
Old 12-22-2005, 09:44 PM
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Infrastructure from Seljuk-Safavid Iran and Timurid Uzbekistan

Source - Wikipedia

(From left to right)

The Kharagan Twin Towers in Iran - Tombs of Seljuk Princes

The Golestan Palace in Iran

The Gur-Imir in Uzbekistan - Mausoleum of Timur

The Shah-i-Zindah in Uzbekistan - Timurid Tombs

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In my dream I saw a tree: green, bright, vast, of indescribable beauty; and on this tree were three kinds of fruit, such as I had never seen among all the fruits of this world. Red, white, and yellow; they shone like globes and living suns ~ Rabia of Basra * Let the beauty we love be what we do ~ Rumi *

MuslimHeritage.com :: Rumi's Poetry :: Ancient Civilizations
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  #26  
Old 12-22-2005, 10:56 PM
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Buildings from Moorish Spain

Source - Wikipedia

(From left to right)

The Mezquita x 3 - Ancient Palace and House of Worship

The Alhambra x 3 - Ancient Palace and Fortress

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In my dream I saw a tree: green, bright, vast, of indescribable beauty; and on this tree were three kinds of fruit, such as I had never seen among all the fruits of this world. Red, white, and yellow; they shone like globes and living suns ~ Rabia of Basra * Let the beauty we love be what we do ~ Rumi *

MuslimHeritage.com :: Rumi's Poetry :: Ancient Civilizations
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  #27  
Old 12-23-2005, 12:00 AM
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Architecture from Byzantine Rome and/or Ottoman Turkey

Sources - Getty Images, myLoupe, Webshots and Wikipedia

(From left to right)

The Hagia Sophia x 3 - Present day Museum

The Sultan Ahmed Mosque x 3

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In my dream I saw a tree: green, bright, vast, of indescribable beauty; and on this tree were three kinds of fruit, such as I had never seen among all the fruits of this world. Red, white, and yellow; they shone like globes and living suns ~ Rabia of Basra * Let the beauty we love be what we do ~ Rumi *

MuslimHeritage.com :: Rumi's Poetry :: Ancient Civilizations
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  #28  
Old 12-23-2005, 12:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toledo
Thanks, Lovy_bear. And those are some interesting links in your signature :)
No prob and thanks, that's why I thought that they were worth posting up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ~*~Humera~*~
yes Mughal architecture is breathtaking, along with the Moorish, it is my favourite among all Islamic architecture. It is a great pity that so many Mughal buildings have been damaged throughout history during various conflicts. The brilliant precious and semi-precious stones that once adorned all those buildings are all but gone.
I think so too. Both Moorish and Mughal buildings are very unique, vibrant and extremely detail-oriented (as are many other infrastructures around the world), which is the main reason as to why I find them so fascinating as well. But I think that the Sultan Ahmed Mosque (in Turkey) has one of the most gorgeous interiors of all Muslim architecture out there, because of its vast rings of glowing light and beautiful stained glass windows.

As for damaged buildings around the world (regardless of the type), I've heard that certain organizations actually give money to individual government officials of different countries, in order to help repair the destruction. But some politicians unfortunately decide to keep the money for personal material gain, as opposed to using it for its actual cause and goal. :( This is what allegedly happened in Uzbekistan a little while ago (for example). If you look closely at the dome of Timur's tomb, you'll notice that it has fungus growing all over it.
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In my dream I saw a tree: green, bright, vast, of indescribable beauty; and on this tree were three kinds of fruit, such as I had never seen among all the fruits of this world. Red, white, and yellow; they shone like globes and living suns ~ Rabia of Basra * Let the beauty we love be what we do ~ Rumi *

MuslimHeritage.com :: Rumi's Poetry :: Ancient Civilizations
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  #29  
Old 12-23-2005, 07:11 AM
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Thanks for all the pictrues, Humera, the Sheesh Mahal is one of my favourite parts of Lahore Fort. Have you ever been when they've had candles lit? It's spectacular.
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  #30  
Old 12-23-2005, 05:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovy_bear
I think so too. Both Moorish and Mughal buildings are very unique, vibrant and extremely detail-oriented (as are many other infrastructures around the world), which is the main reason as to why I find them so fascinating as well. But I think that the Sultan Ahmed Mosque (in Turkey) has one of the most gorgeous interiors of all Muslim architecture out there, because of its vast rings of glowing light and beautiful stained glass windows.
oh yes, I forgot about the Ottomans. I love that style of architecture too, especially the mosques and palaces (topkapi).
I think the reason I love Mughal and Moorish styles is because they're a brilliant mixture of Islamic and local influences.

Quote:
As for damaged buildings around the world (regardless of the type), I've heard that certain organizations actually give money to individual government officials of different countries, in order to help repair the destruction.
thats true. There's also the fact that, as Little star mentioned, some of the governments have other priorities. And ofcourse modern development continues to threaten historic sites. Only recently I saw two amazing documentaries on the subject, one of them was about an ancient Roman villa discovered in Turkey. Miraculously it had a perfectly preserved and stunning mosaic floor which literally had to be cut out in pieces and carted off to a local museum because the area was going to be flooded (I think, in order to be turned into a dam). The local population had to be evacuated as well. The other doc was about an egyptian site where archaeologists had to race against time in order to salvage as many artifacts as possible before the government could pour concrete all over it and build a bridge.

About some of the sites in Lahore. I think the government does realize the need to take action and had asked UNESCO and the World Heritage committee for help to preserve sites like Shalimar:
http://whc.unesco.org/pg.cfm?cid=31&id_site=171

An excerpt from the wikipedia article on the Lahore fort:

"The Pakistani Government seems to understand the historic value of this fort, as is evident from this warning prominently placed at the visitor entrance to the fort:
WARNING: The Fort is a protected monument under the Antiquities Act 1975. It is incumbent upon everyone to take care and so safeguard it by avoiding any damage, destruction, misuse, bill posting, fixing of commercial sign, other scribbling on the structure etc. If anybody is found involved in the violation of aforementioned acts he/she shall be punishable with fine, which may extend to Rs.200,000/= (US $3,300) or with rigorous imprisonment for a term which may extend to three years or with fine or with both under the Antiquities Act, 1975. (The activity indicated was undertaken with the support of the World Heritage Fund of UNESCO)."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lahore_Fort

The British did their part in damaging historic Mughal buildings as well (destroying a part of the Lahore Fort) not to mention the stories of them carrying off the jewels adorning some of these buildings.
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  #31  
Old 12-23-2005, 06:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Little_star
Thanks for all the pictrues, Humera, the Sheesh Mahal is one of my favourite parts of Lahore Fort. Have you ever been when they've had candles lit? It's spectacular.
no I haven't. I know places like Shalimar get all decked out for state occasions like indepence day this year, they have fireworks and everything. It must look breath-taking.
When I was little I did see Badshahi mosque though...it is so majestic!
My mom's family lives in Lahore and everytime we visited them we always took in the sights. You have been there but for those who haven't Its difficult to describe how steeped in history and myth that ancient city is. Often we'd just be driving down a road and would spot an old Mughal building, we'd stop and get out of the car to take a better look. And there would always be a guide or some local person to tell us about its history.
Simply amazing.
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  #32  
Old 12-23-2005, 08:48 PM
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Badshahi Masjid

The Badshahi Masjid (بادشاەى مسجد), literally the 'King's Mosque', was built in 1673 by Aurangzeb in Lahore, Pakistan. It is one of the city's best known landmarks, and a major tourist attraction epitomising the beauty and grandeur of the Mughal era.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Badshahi_Mosque

The emperor or the Badshahi Mosque is across the courtyard from Alamgiri Gate of the Lahore Fort. The Mosque which is made up entirely of sand-stone was built by Emperor Aurangzeb, the last of the great Mughals, in a record time of the two and-a-half years. Its construction was completed by 1674 A.D. It has a beautiful gate-way which measures 21.33 meters in length and a courtyard that measures 161.5 x 160.6 meters and is said to be the largest mosque courtyard in the world for outdoor prayers.

The marble domes cover seven prayer chambers. Four lofty minarets stand at the four corners of the mosque, each with an outer circumference of 20 meters, soaring up to 54 meters. In the chambers above the gate of the mosque, are housed relics attributed to the Holy Prophet of Islam peace be upon him, His Daughter and His Son-in-Law and are said to have been brought to the sub-continent by Amir Taimur. Within the Mosque almost all the colors have been used for painting the floral designs but the overall effect remains one of sobriety, piousness and simplicity.

http://www.vista-tourism.com/geography/punjab.htm

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  #33  
Old 12-23-2005, 08:53 PM
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Badshahi Masjid ("King's Mosque") - Details

Pictures from APL and oriental architecture

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  #34  
Old 12-23-2005, 09:08 PM
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Badshahi Masjid ("King's Mosque") - Interior

the interior is my favourite part. Its absolutely beautiful, pictures dont do it justice.

From APL and oriental architecture

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  #35  
Old 12-23-2005, 09:59 PM
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Badshahi Masjid ("King's Mosque") - At night

the mosque, like other mosques and buildings in Pakistan, is lavishly decorated with lights during Ramadan and the festivals of Eid.

Pictures from APL and webshots:


Lahore fort across the mosque
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  #36  
Old 12-23-2005, 11:40 PM
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aawww... Humera... you made my day!

i love seeing all these gorgeous palaces from the east.
we often "go west" to see all the glamour & grandeur of palaces, but as you can see... the splendour belong to the east too...
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Old 12-24-2005, 04:45 PM
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Originally Posted by ~*~Humera~*~
no I haven't. I know places like Shalimar get all decked out for state occasions like indepence day this year, they have fireworks and everything. It must look breath-taking
Next time you visit, be sure to take a lighter and some candles with you, the palce looks so beautiful. We did all the old Mughal sights back in 1996 and we had our English neighbours with us, so at all of these places, the caretakers went all out to ensure they saw the places at their best. So one guy actually went to find some candles for us so we could view it in all its glory. You could imagine how breathtaking it must have been with the precious stones in the walls!

I love the Badshahi Mosque as well, next time I go, I'm definitely going to try and see some of those places again, I really want to see Jehanghir's tomb as well.
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  #38  
Old 12-26-2005, 07:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by purple_platinum
aawww... Humera... you made my day!

i love seeing all these gorgeous palaces from the east.
we often "go west" to see all the glamour & grandeur of palaces, but as you can see... the splendour belong to the east too...
Im glad you enjoyed it!
Lets not forget the inspirtion the west has always drawn from the east.
not to mention the fact that the people who built these magnificent monuments had to be a lot more creative than their western counterparts, they couldn't rely on depictions of the human body, statues etc. (I am speaking of Islamic art and and architectrue here) Which is why we see such splending murals, geometric and floral designs inlaid with precious stones etc.
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  #39  
Old 12-26-2005, 07:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Little_star
I love the Badshahi Mosque as well, next time I go, I'm definitely going to try and see some of those places again, I really want to see Jehanghir's tomb as well.
I saw Emperor Jehangir and his wife Empress Noor Jehan's tomb years ago.
The visit to the Empress' tomb was especially memorable. The cenotaph itself is beautifully decorated, but the actual grave is several feet below it underground. A guide took us down a flight of stairs, it was really dark so he brought a candle with him. And then we saw the actual grave of Noor Jehan, it was simply covered with soil. And if I remember correctly, there was another grave right next to hers (not her husband's...I dont remember who it was). And right around us we could see secret tunnels dating back to Mughal times. But their entrances had been closed up.
Jehangir's grave is probably laid out the same way because it is in keeping with Islamic tradition to be buried in a simple unmarked grave. If you find a guide be sure to ask him about it and take you underground. It is a very humbling experience to see the modest resting place of a once great empress.
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Old 12-27-2005, 08:32 AM
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"The British did their part in damaging historic Mughal buildings as well (destroying a part of the Lahore Fort) not to mention the stories of them carrying off the jewels adorning some of these buildings."

I know,it's absolutely horrible, you can see the gaps in the walls where they gouged out precisous stones, looking at the gaps some of them must have been incredibly big.

Thanks for the info on Noor Jehan's and Jehanghir's tombs, I always find it incredibly humbling when rulers and Kings have such modest graves, I believe King Fahd was also buried in a similar manner. I cannot wait to see both!
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