The Royal Forums Coat of Arms


Join The Royal Forums Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
  #41  
Old 03-11-2010, 05:10 AM
Wisteria's Avatar
Courtier
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Maidenhead, United Kingdom
Posts: 632
May I make a summary of this subject.

1. Some went some stayed.
2. Some were exemplary and some were not.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 03-12-2010, 03:44 AM
RoyalistRiley's Avatar
Courtier
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 511
The Duke fo Windsor (ex King Edward VIII) spent the war as Governor of the Bahamas. It was believed that the Duke should be kept as far away as possible from the war due to his fascist leanings.
__________________

__________________
God Save the Queen! Advance Australia Fair!
"Life is a game in which the player must appear ridiculous" - The Dowager Countess of Grantham, Downton Abbey
http://twitter.com/FutureSirRiley
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 03-12-2013, 12:54 PM
Commoner
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Visiting MacDuff, United Kingdom
Posts: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoyalistRiley View Post
The Duke fo Windsor (ex King Edward VIII) spent the war as Governor of the Bahamas. It was believed that the Duke should be kept as far away as possible from the war due to his fascist leanings.
That's a fascinating fact.

Thanks!
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 03-12-2013, 01:17 PM
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Philadelphia, United States
Posts: 4,460
I may be mistaken about this, but weren't many of the people who fled to Canada and the USA considered cowardly by those who stayed? I read Nancy Mitford's books set in that era, and she had some scathing things to say about people who used children as a ticket out.

(I remember there was a popular song titled The King is still in London that lauded him for refusing to evacuate.)

There was also that story that when Parliament was considering leaving the capital, the King and Churchill wore Sten guns onto the floor and said that if nobody else would stay and fight, they would.
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 10-25-2016, 10:10 PM
CyrilVladisla's Avatar
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Conneaut, United States
Posts: 4,419
King Ferdinand I of Romania decorated French General Berthelot during World War I.
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 11-03-2016, 09:55 PM
CyrilVladisla's Avatar
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Conneaut, United States
Posts: 4,419
Starting in 1917 Emperor Charles I of Austria tried to make a separate peace treaty between Austria and the Allies. To this end he sent his brothers-in-law, Prince Sixtus and Prince Xavier, on several occasions, to the governments of France and England.
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 11-22-2016, 08:56 PM
CyrilVladisla's Avatar
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Conneaut, United States
Posts: 4,419
Queen Consort Elizabeth spoke at the beginning of the Second World War to the nation.
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 08-08-2017, 10:13 AM
Nobility
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Paris, France
Posts: 268
Looking at these images 99 years after the end of the 1914-18 War has made me speculate about how, if at all, the centenary of the end of so many monarchies will be marked next year when the thrones of Austria-Hungary, the German Empire/Prussia, Bavaria, Saxony, Wurttemberg, Montenegro, the German Grand Duchies, Principalities and Duchies plus the embryonic Kingdoms of Finland and Lithuania were all swept away. 1918 will also be the centenary of the murder of Tsar Nicholas II, as well.
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 08-08-2017, 11:04 AM
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Pittsburgh, United States
Posts: 4,221
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mirabel View Post
I may be mistaken about this, but weren't many of the people who fled to Canada and the USA considered cowardly by those who stayed? I read Nancy Mitford's books set in that era, and she had some scathing things to say about people who used children as a ticket out.

I suppose that the monarchs who fled to England and continued the war from there with a government in exile, e.g. Wilhelmina of the Netherlands and Haakon VII of Norway, were viewed mostly favorably by the populace of their respective countries. Christian X stayed in Denmark during the war , but is still viewed mostly favorably as someone who (at least pasively) opposed / defied the Nazi occupation; the extent to which that was actually true is debatable.

Leopold III of the Belgians, who also stayed in the country and was effectively held under house arrest by the Germans, is on the contrary viewed mostly negatively for two main reasons: first, he was at odds with the Belgian government in exile in London, who had advised him to leave with them for England and continue the war from there; second, it was inevitable that his decision to surrender to the Germans would be contrasted to his father's heroic stance during WWI when King Albert I never surrendered and took personal command of the Belgian army, holding on to a small piece of unoccupied Belgian territory throughout the war. The latter, however, was not an option for Leopold III as, unlike in WWI, there was no stalemate and years-long trench warfare in Belgium; the German blitzkrieg pretty much overran the country and the Allies were not in a position to strike back until 1944.

In hindsight, following Wilhelmina's and Haakion's examples and leaving for England rather than surrendering and staying in Belgium against the advice of his own ministers would have been better in the long run for Leopold III's image, but subsequent insinuations that he was a collaborationist, especially after meeting with Hitler personally in 1940, are again debatable.
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 08-08-2017, 11:48 AM
Majesty
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 6,215
I think Nancy Mitford's books mentioned upper class English people, some with American connections, who opted to sit out the war in comfort in Canada and the US, rather than monarchs etc who fled to England because their countries were conquered.

Of course, for those who had Jewish blood, saw what had been happening on the Continent, and feared a German invasion of Britain, there was some excuse. As well, people of means feared mass bombing and wanted to at least get their children out even if they stayed. Quite a few such children crossed the Atlantic in the first year or so of the war. Then a u-boat attacked one of these vessels carrying youngsters and there was a huge loss of life. So the voyages virtually stopped.

Some were criticised in newspapers for flights out of Britain. I know Alexander Korda (the filmmaker) and Noel Coward, both of whom crossed over to the US frequently, were the subject of attack. Churchill was embarrassed, as Korda was often undertaking secret diplomatic missions in Washington on behalf of the British Government, but frequent Press attacks meant he had to defend Korda (a naturalised Englishman) on the floor of the House of Commons.

Coward was also on 'showing the British flag' endeavours on these excursions. The poet WS Auden, who had left the UK permanently for the US just before the start of the war, was also hauled over the coals by newspaper journalists, though what use he would have been in the British armed services, heaven knows!

As for more obscure middleclass people, who knows whether their departure across the Atlantic was greatly resented. No doubt opinion was mixed. Perhaps some said they were cowards, others 'Half their luck!' Some were too old to be of much help in the war effort anyway.
Reply With Quote
  #51  
Old 03-29-2018, 05:32 PM
CyrilVladisla's Avatar
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Conneaut, United States
Posts: 4,419
Queen Marie of Romania was dubbed "Mother of the Wounded" and "Mother of Soldiers" thanks to her active role during the First World War. She travelled to both the front line and to hospitals to ease the suffering of soldiers.
Reply With Quote
  #52  
Old 06-17-2018, 04:36 AM
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: London, United Kingdom
Posts: 3,640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curryong View Post
I think Nancy Mitford's books mentioned upper class English people, some with American connections, who opted to sit out the war in comfort in Canada and the US, rather than monarchs etc who fled to England because their countries were conquered.

Of course, for those who had Jewish blood, saw what had been happening on the Continent, and feared a German invasion of Britain, there was some excuse. As well, people of means feared mass bombing and wanted to at least get their children out even if they stayed. Quite a few such children crossed the Atlantic in the first year or so of the war. Then a u-boat attacked one of these vessels carrying youngsters and there was a huge loss of life. So the voyages virtually stopped.

Some were criticised in newspapers for flights out of Britain. I know Alexander Korda (the filmmaker) and Noel Coward, both of whom crossed over to the US frequently, were the subject of attack. Churchill was embarrassed, as Korda was often undertaking secret diplomatic missions in Washington on behalf of the British Government, but frequent Press attacks meant he had to defend Korda (a naturalised Englishman) on the floor of the House of Commons.



As for more obscure middleclass people, who knows whether their departure across the Atlantic was greatly resented. No doubt opinion was mixed. Perhaps some said they were cowards, others 'Half their luck!' Some were too old to be of much help in the war effort anyway.
tehere is a difference between the monarch leaving and ordinary people, usually rich ones, leaving. The monarch was the symbol of the country, and if he or she stayed, they were in effect giving in to the Nazis and accepting their rule.. It was difficult for htem to avoid accusations of collaboration, even if their motives were to try and protect their people and keep the Nazis from the worst excesses... For ordinary rich people who were able to leave or send their children away, the implication was that they were avoiding the bombs and the shortages and avoiding having to fight or help the war effort.. If they were Jewish it was understandable.. but otherwise, many thought they were being cowardly...
Reply With Quote
  #53  
Old 07-07-2018, 05:17 PM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Orkanger, Norway
Posts: 3
you wrote:
CP Märtha and the children (Princess Astrid, Princess Ragnhild and Prince Harald) tried to escape to Sweden, but was refused entry. They were evacuated to the USA, and stayed there the entire war. They visited Norwegian training camps for pilots and soldiers in Canada to boost morale. They also became friends with president Roosevelt and his wife.[/QUOTE]

This is what happend:
WW2
When Germany attacked Norway on April 9, 1940, the Royal Family, the Government and most of the parliamentarians managed to leave Oslo before the German troops moved in. Crown Princess Märtha and the three children crossed the border to Sweden the same night. On August 12, they traveled to the United States, on invitation from Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Crown Prince pair had become close friends with the American presidential couple during a long visit to the USA in the summer of 1939. Crown Princess Märtha worked tirelessly for Norwegian interests, and her friendship with the presidential couple helped to make her go through. She participated in a wide range of areas, from official visits, lectures and talks, to relief missions and refugee work.

The Crown Princess returned to Norway with the children and King Haakon, June 7, 1945. She was met with great warmth - her great efforts during the war had made her even more popular among the people at home.

While king and Crown Prince continued the flight to northern Norway and later to England, Crown Princess Märtha traveled across the border with Sälen with his child and sought shelter with his Swedish family.

Eventually it became Ulriksdal Castle at Edsviken just north of Stockholm, which became the temporary resting place while the war raged in Norway and outside Europe.

Prince Harald becomes great politician
The summer idyll on Ulriksdal lasted only a few months. The Crown Princess was exposed to a strong political press from Oslo, where heavy political interests would cooperate with the occupation power and insert the three-year-old Prince Harald as new king in Norway. Also, King Gustav V and the Swedish government believed that this could save the Norwegian kingdom, and Gustav V sent a letter to Hitler and recommended this solution.

The situation was completely unsustainable for the wars of refugees on Ulriksdal. The Norwegian royal house had to choose a page. The Crown Princess and the children could not risk standing on one side while King Haakon VII and Crown Prince Olav stood on the other with the Allies in London.

It was time to travel from Ulriksdal. In a hurry, the Norwegian warships break up in August 1940 and travel through Sweden and Finland to the port of Petchenga in the present Russia. There they board aboard a US troop ship that brought them to safety in the United States.

My dear Godfather
In the documentary "Crown Princess Märtha's War" we follow the Norwegian war refugees throughout their stay in the United States in the period 1940-1945. From the dramatic press conference at the Waldorf Astoria New York hotel, when the Crown Princess is in the center of the World Press, to their new home outside of Washington on the property "Pooks Hill". Through brand new sources, not least the crown princess's own slim film footage and photographs, we get close to the royal exile existence.

From the very first day, the Crown Princess and her children were practically incorporated into President Franklin D Roosevelt's own family. They often lived in the White House and in the president's private country-house, and Roosevelt engages strongly and personally in everything that happened in the life of the little family. In his letter, the Crown Princess calls the American president for "My dear Godfather".

In the documentary we also follow the Norwegian author Tor Bomann-Larsen in the crown princess's footsteps in Washington and New York. - Crown Princess Märtha meant a lot to the American president, and she gave a huge human contribution to ease the huge burden rested on the president during the war. Her role was in the international arena. Crown Princess Märtha belonged to world history, says King Biennographer Tor Bomann-Larsen.


There is also made a movie about those days in 1940 and its called: The King's Choice ( it can be seen on Amazon)

Good movie
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old 07-07-2018, 05:23 PM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Orkanger, Norway
Posts: 3
About H.R.H CP Märtha

WW2
When Germany attacked Norway on April 9, 1940, the Royal Family, the Government and most of the parliamentarians managed to leave Oslo before the German troops moved in. Crown Princess Märtha and the three children crossed the border to Sweden the same night. On August 12, they traveled to the United States, on invitation from Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Crown Prince pair had become close friends with the American presidential couple during a long visit to the USA in the summer of 1939. Crown Princess Märtha worked tirelessly for Norwegian interests, and her friendship with the presidential couple helped to make her go through. She participated in a wide range of areas, from official visits, lectures and talks, to relief missions and refugee work.

The Crown Princess returned to Norway with the children and King Haakon, June 7, 1945. She was met with great warmth - her great efforts during the war had made her even more popular among the people at home.

While king and Crown Prince continued the flight to northern Norway and later to England, Crown Princess Märtha traveled across the border with Sälen with his child and sought shelter with his Swedish family.

Eventually it became Ulriksdal Castle at Edsviken just north of Stockholm, which became the temporary resting place while the war raged in Norway and outside Europe.

Prince Harald becomes great politician
The summer idyll on Ulriksdal lasted only a few months. The Crown Princess was exposed to a strong political press from Oslo, where heavy political interests would cooperate with the occupation power and insert the three-year-old Prince Harald as new king in Norway. Also, King Gustav V and the Swedish government believed that this could save the Norwegian kingdom, and Gustav V sent a letter to Hitler and recommended this solution.

The situation was completely unsustainable for the wars of refugees on Ulriksdal. The Norwegian royal house had to choose a page. The Crown Princess and the children could not risk standing on one side while King Haakon VII and Crown Prince Olav stood on the other with the Allies in London.

It was time to travel from Ulriksdal. In a hurry, the Norwegian warships break up in August 1940 and travel through Sweden and Finland to the port of Petchenga in the present Russia. There they board aboard a US troop ship that brought them to safety in the United States.

My dear Godfather
In the documentary "Crown Princess Märtha's War" we follow the Norwegian war refugees throughout their stay in the United States in the period 1940-1945. From the dramatic press conference at the Waldorf Astoria New York hotel, when the Crown Princess is in the center of the World Press, to their new home outside of Washington on the property "Pooks Hill". Through brand new sources, not least the crown princess's own slim film footage and photographs, we get close to the royal exile existence.

From the very first day, the Crown Princess and her children were practically incorporated into President Franklin D Roosevelt's own family. They often lived in the White House and in the president's private country-house, and Roosevelt engages strongly and personally in everything that happened in the life of the little family. In his letter, the Crown Princess calls the American president for "My dear Godfather".

In the documentary we also follow the Norwegian author Tor Bomann-Larsen in the crown princess's footsteps in Washington and New York. - Crown Princess Märtha meant a lot to the American president, and she gave a huge human contribution to ease the huge burden rested on the president during the war. Her role was in the international arena. Crown Princess Märtha belonged to world history, says King Biennographer Tor Bomann-Larsen.

There is a good movie that was made in 2016 or 2017, its called The Kings Choice, its about those first days of war in Norway 1940. It is with english sub. You can find it on Amazon
Reply With Quote
  #55  
Old 07-08-2018, 11:14 AM
Courtier
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: St Thomas, U.S. Minor Outlying Islands
Posts: 977
Thank you for the excellent post! I agree that Crown Princess Märtha was a real advocate for her country.
Reply With Quote
  #56  
Old 07-22-2018, 10:44 PM
CyrilVladisla's Avatar
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Conneaut, United States
Posts: 4,419
Emperor Wilhelm II's speech about the First World War
Reply With Quote
  #57  
Old 07-23-2018, 12:10 AM
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Pittsburgh, United States
Posts: 4,221
Quote:
Originally Posted by CyrilVladisla View Post
Emperor Wilhelm II's speech about the First World War

Let's not forget:


1) Emperor (Kaiser) Wilhelm II, King George V, and Empress (Tsarina) Alexandra Feodorovna (Alix of Hesse) were first cousins (all of them were grandchildren of Queen Victoria).


2) King George V and Emperor (Tsar) Nicholas II were also first cousins (both were grandsons of King Christian IX of Denmark).



3) King George V and Kaiser Wilhelm II, if I am not mistaken, were also both second cousins once removed to King Albert I of the Belgians since Albert I was a great-grandson of Francis, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, whereas George V and Wilheim II were both great-great-grandsons of the same said duke.
Reply With Quote
  #58  
Old 07-23-2018, 03:00 AM
Heir Presumptive
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: alpine village, Germany
Posts: 2,132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mbruno View Post
Let's not forget:

3) King George V and Kaiser Wilhelm II, if I am not mistaken, were also both second cousins once removed to King Albert I of the Belgians since Albert I was a great-grandson of Francis, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, whereas George V and Wilheim II were both great-great-grandsons of the same said duke.

Yep. Because Ernst I. (father of prince Albert), Victoria (mother of queen Victoria) and Leopold I (first king of the Belgians) were siblings, the Belgian Royal family is related to the BRF through several lines.

Leopold's daughter Charlotte of Belgium (so a direct cousin of Victoria and Albert) was the sister-in-law of emperor Franz Joseph I., married to the unfortunate Archduke Maximilian who died on trying to defend his throne as emperor of Mexico).



Plus queen Luise of Prussia, the mother of German Emperor Wilhelm I was the niece of Sophie Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strehlitz, George III.'s queen.

Thus queen Victoria and Wilhelm I. were cousins.



Another sibling was prince Ferdinand, whose son (named Ferdinand, too) became king of Portugal as husband of the Portugese heiress queen Maria II.


The husband and prince consort of queen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands, who granted Wilhelm II. asylum after WWII., was a cousin of the emperor. His grandmother Alexandrine of Prussia was a sister of Wilhelm I.. The Dutch Royal House in the time between 1850 and 1918 had lots of intermarriages between Prussian princes and princesses and Royals from the Netherlands, so Wilhelm I. and queen Wilhelmina were closely related, too.
Reply With Quote
  #59  
Old 08-04-2018, 09:56 PM
CyrilVladisla's Avatar
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Conneaut, United States
Posts: 4,419
Princess Antoinette of Monaco rolled bandages in the Second World War and visited the Italian and German soldiers who had been sent to Monaco's hospital for medical help.
Reply With Quote
  #60  
Old 08-10-2018, 10:36 PM
CyrilVladisla's Avatar
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Conneaut, United States
Posts: 4,419
Emperor Charles I of Austria at the bedside of a wounded man in 1917.
http://www.gettyimages.com/license/551900891
__________________

Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Hitler, the Hohenzollerns and WWII BlenheimSpaniel The Royal House of Prussia and Princely House of Hohenzollern 11 12-17-2014 06:51 PM
What If WWI/WWII Hadn't Happened? CSENYC General Royal Discussion 4 07-15-2013 12:27 AM
what would have happened if the emperor was dethroned after WWII? KathyMoore Japanese Royal History 30 11-17-2009 06:30 AM




Popular Tags
belgian book bracelets british royal family britishroyals camilla caracciolo clothes countess of wessex crown princess victoria current events current events thread daughters denmark documentary duchessofcambridge duchess of sussex duke of cambridge dutch royal family fashion felipe vi forum genetics gordon hasnat khan helena iñaki urdangarín juan carlos kate middleton king felipe and queen letizia current events king philippe king willem-alexander letizia lineage meghan markle member patron porphyria prince prince charles prince harry prince harry of wales princenapoleon prince of belgium princess beatrice princess claire princess diana princess eugenie queen elisabeth queen elizabeth queen mary of teck quizz remarriage royal royal ancestry royal geneology royal wedding sarah duchess of york spain state visit surname sweden swedish royal family swedish royal registry tradition visit from sweden visit to spain wedding windsor castle windsor wedding



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:12 AM.

Social Knowledge Networks

eXTReMe Tracker
Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2018
Jelsoft Enterprises