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  #1  
Old 08-10-2008, 03:30 AM
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Alternate succession methods to the British Crown

Alternative Orders of Succession
Succession of the Britsh Crown, from 1901

(not taking abdications or Catholic excusions into account)

Cognatic Primogeniture is where male heirs take precedence over female, with children representing their deceased ancestors; and the older child precedes the younger. Currently used by Denmark, Monaco and Spain; and previously by Brazil, Greece and Portugal.
  • King Edward VII (1901-1910)
  • King George V (1910-1936) – eldest son
  • King Edward VIII (1936-1972) – eldest son
  • HM Queen Elizabeth II (1972- present) – eldest niece
  • HRH The Prince Charles (Heir Apparent) – eldest son
  • HRH Prince William (2nd Heir Apparent) – eldest son
Absolute Primogeniture is where the right of succession passes to the eldest child of the sovereign, regardless of gender, females enjoying the same right of succession as males.
Belgium, the Netherlands, Norway and Sweden all switched to this system in the 1980’s.
  • King Edward VII (1901-1910)
  • King George V (1910-1936) – eldest son
  • King Edward VIII (1936-1972) – eldest son
  • HM Queen Elizabeth II (since 1972) – eldest niece
  • HRH The Prince Charles (Heir Apparent) – eldest son
  • HRH Prince William (2nd Heir Apparent) – eldest son
Agnatic Primogeniture, also known as Salic Law, entirely excludes females from the hereditary succession. This was practised by most continental European monarchies, as well as Japan and Nepal. In some cases, females could inherit upon the extinction of every male in the order of succession.
  • King Edward VII (1901-1910)
  • King George V (1910-1936) – eldest son
  • King Edward VIII (1936-1972) – eldest son
  • King Henry IX (1972-1974) –only surviving brother
  • HM King Richard IV (since 1974) – the current Duke of Gloucester
  • HRH The Prince Alexander (Heir Apparent) – the current Earl of Ulster
  • HRH Prince Xan (2nd Heir Apparent) – the current Lord Culloden
Agnatic Seniority is where thesuccession to the throne passes to the monarch's next-eldest brother (even if the monarch has his own sons), and then only to the first monarch's sons (the next generation) after males of the eldest generation have all been exhausted. This is the system used in Saudi Arabia, and was also in use in Ethiopia and Russia.
  • King Edward VII (1901-1910)
  • King Arthur (1910-1942) –only surviving brother
  • King Edward VIII (1942-1972) – eldest grand-nephew
  • King Henry IX (1972-1974) –only surviving brother
  • HM King Richard IV (since 1974) – the current Duke of Gloucester
  • HRH The Prince Alexander (Heir Apparent) – the current Earl of Ulster
  • HRH Prince Xan (2nd Heir Apparent) – the current Lord Culloden
Matrilineal primogeniture is where the eldest female child inherits the throne to the total exclusion of males. The order of succession to the position of the Rain Queen is an example in an African culture of matrilineal primogeniture: not only is dynastic descent reckoned through the female line, but only females are eligible to inherit.
  • Queen Victoria II (Jan-Aug 1901) – eldest daughter of Queen Victoria
  • Queen Charlotte (1901-1919) - eldest daughter
  • Queen Feodora (1919-1945) - only daughter
  • Queen Victoria III (1945-1950) - senior cousin
  • Queen Alice (1950-1969) - eldest daughter (mother of Prince Phillip)
  • Queen Margarita (1969-1981) - eldest daughter (sister of Prince Phillip)
  • HM Queen Beatrix (since 1981) - only surviving daughter
Male inheritance through females. This particular system of inheritance applied to the thrones of the Picts of Northern Britain and the Etruscans of Italy. Although the ruler was always male, inheritance was matrilineal so a king would typically be succeeded by his daughter's husband or his sister's son.
  • King Edward VII (1901-1910)
  • King Olav (1910-1991) - maternal grandson - Olav V of Norway
  • HM King Haakon (since 1991) – maternal grandson
Ultimogeniture is an order of succession where the subject is succeeded by the youngest son. This was practised within the Mongol Empire as a method of renewal.
  • King Edward VII (1901-1910)
  • King George V (1910-1936) – youngest surviving son
  • King George VI (1936-1942) – actually the former Duke of Kent
  • HM King Michael (since 1942) – actually Prince Michael of Kent
  • HRH Prince Frederick (Heir Apparent) – Lord Frederick Windsor
Lateral Succession mandates the principle of seniority among members of a dynasty or dynastic clan. The monarch is the most mature elder of the clan. This ensures that mature leaders are in charge, removing a need for regents. When no male heir is mature enough, a female heir is usually determined by proximity to the last monarch. This system was used amongst Scottish clans, and some Asian monarchies.
  • King Edward VII (1901-1910)
  • King Arthur (1910-1942)
  • King Charles Edward (1942-1954)
  • King Alexander (1954-1960)
  • King Edward VIII (1960-1972)
  • King Henry IX (1972-1974)
  • HM King Edward IX (since 1974) – the current Duke of Kent
  • HRH The Prince Michael (Heir Presumptive) – Prince Michael of Kent
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  #2  
Old 08-10-2008, 03:31 AM
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More Alternate Successions

Gavelkind was a method of succession in Ireland and Wales, by which the land was divided at the death of the holder amongst his sons. Illegitimate sons, but not daughters, were included in the division. The father normally prescribed the division before his death. Alternatively, the youngest son divided the land into equal parts. The eldest son chose first, followed by the second and so on until the youngest received the remaining land. This resulted in many petty kingdoms, and a similar system (only benefiting legitimate sons) reduced the Holy Roman Empire to over 300 princely states by the 19th century. If there were no male successors, the land was resumed to be re-divided amongst other surviving kin.
  • King Edward VII (1901-1910) – kingdom to only surviving son:
  • King George V (1910-1936) – kingdom quartered amongst sons:
    • Prince Edward gains England
    • Prince Albert gains Scotland – ( the late King George VI)
    • Prince Henry gains Ireland
    • Prince George gains Wales & the Isle of Man
  • King George VI of Wales (1936-1942) dies, Wales is divided between his two sons:
    • Prince Edward gains South Wales
    • Prince Michael gains North Wales & The Isle of Man
  • King Albert of Scotland (1936-1952) dies without a male heir, Scotland is divided amongst his brothers and nephews:
    • King Edward VIII of England gains the Scottish Lowlands
    • King Henry IX of Ireland gains the Scottish Highlands
    • King Edward of South Wales gains the Northern Isles
    • King Michael of North Wales gains the Western Isles
  • King Edward VIII of England (1936-1972) dies without an heir, England and the Scottish Lowlands are divided amongst his brother and nephews
    • King Henry IX of Ireland gains the Scottish Lowlands & Northern England
    • HM King Edward of South Wales gains Southern England
      • Prince George ( Senior Heir Apparent)
      • Prince Nicholas (Junior Heir Apparent)
    • HM King Michael of North Wales gains the English Midlands
      • HRH Prince Frederick (Heir Apparent)
  • King Henry IX of Ireland & Scotland (1936-1974) dies, realm inherited by
    • HM King Richard IV of Ireland & Scotland (since 1974)
      • HRH Prince Alexander (Heir Apparent)
      • HRH Prince Xan (2nd Heir Apparent)


Tanistry, or elective monarchy, is a system where a king was elected from candidates who were members of the kindred descended in the male line from a common ancestor, all of whom are considered to have equally legitimate claims on the Throne. Those eligible to vote are princes who have attained their majority. This system is in use in Cambodia, Kuwait, Malaysia and the United Arab Emirates, and was formerly used to choose the King of Scotland and the High King of Ireland. It was also in use in Anglo-Saxon England, Hawaii, Poland, and medieval Scandinavia. Typically, votes would be cast in family blocks.
  • King Edward VII (1901-1910) – successor from candidates:
    • Prince Arthur (brother) – probable victor
    • Prince George (son)
    • Prince Arthur (nephew)
    • Prince Charles Edward (nephew)
  • King Arthur (1910-1942) – successor from candidates:
    • Prince Arthur (son)
    • Prince Edward (grand-nephew) – probable victor
    • Prince Albert (grand-nephew)
    • Prince Henry (grand-nephew)
    • Prince George (grand-nephew)
    • Prince John Leopold (grand-nephew)
    • Prince Hubert (grand-nephew)
    • Prince Alastair (grandson)
    • Prince Frederick Josias (grand-nephew)
  • King Edward VIII (1942-1972) - successor from candidates:
    • Prince Henry of Gloucester (brother) – probable victor
    • Prince Ernest (second cousin)
    • HRH Prince Edward of Kent (nephew)
    • HH Prince Peter of Saxe-Coburg & Gotha
    • Prince William of Gloucester(nephew)
    • HRH Prince Michael of Kent (nephew)
    • Prince Federick Josias (second cousin)
    • HRH Prince Richard of Gloucester (nephew)
    • HRH Prince Charles of Wales (grandnephew)
  • King Henry IX (1972-1974) – successor from candidates:
    • Prince Ernest (second cousin)
    • HRH Prince Edward of Kent (nephew) – probable victor
    • HH Hereditary Prince Peter of Saxe-Coburg & Gotha (second cousin)
    • HH Prince Andreas of Saxe-Coburg & Gotha
    • HRH Prince Michael of Kent (nephew)
    • Prince Federick Josias (second cousin)
    • HRH Prince Richard of Gloucester (son)
    • HRH Prince Charles of Wales (grandnephew)
  • King Edward IX (since 1974) – currently eligible succession candidates:
    • HH Prince Peter of Saxe-Coburg & Gotha
    • HH Prince Andreas of Saxe-Coburg & Gotha
    • HRH Prince Michael of Kent
    • HRH Prince Richard of Gloucester
    • HRH Prince Charles of Wales
    • HRH Prince Andrew of York
    • George Windsor, Earl of St Andrews
    • HRH Prince Edward of Wessex
    • Lord Nicholas Windsor
    • Alexander Windsor, Earl of Ulster
    • HH Prince Hubertus of Saxe-Coburg & Gotha
    • Lord Frederick Windsor
    • HRH Prince William of Wales
    • HRH Prince Harry of Wales
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  #3  
Old 08-10-2008, 03:52 AM
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So, which method of succession do you prefer?
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  #4  
Old 08-10-2008, 04:03 AM
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I hope they would have picked a more conventional name than Xan if he was going to be a prince.
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  #5  
Old 08-10-2008, 04:47 AM
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according to wikipedia:

Xan Windsor, Lord Culloden (Xan Richard Anders Windsor; born 12 March 2007) is the only son and heir of Alexander Windsor, Earl of Ulster and his wife, Claire Windsor, Countess of Ulster (nιe Booth).
His father being the only son of Prince Richard, Duke of Gloucester and Birgitte, Duchess of Gloucester, Lord Culloden is second in line to the Dukedom of Gloucester, and 21st in line to the British Throne. He is currently the only grandchild of The Duke and Duchess of Gloucester.
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