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  #21  
Old 04-25-2009, 01:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crisińaki View Post
How about bringing water from the Jordan River to christening the little ones?
I think this is a wonderful tradition.
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  #22  
Old 05-10-2010, 12:50 AM
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Getting the water from the Jordan river, i think, signifies a link with Christ's baptism...I mean, most of the royalties are Christians
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  #23  
Old 05-20-2010, 09:12 AM
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Children of royals are treated no more differently than childrten of commoners by the Church. What a preposterous and silly idea that they are.
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  #24  
Old 07-18-2010, 10:00 PM
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About the presence of parents at christenings, a few decades ago in some catholic regions (I'm portuguese) the mother wouldn't be present at a baby's christening. For example, my grandmother stayed home during the christening of all her 4 children.

This has to do with some ancient traditions that forbade newmothers from entering a church for some time after birth (most places said 40 days I believe).
Nowadays no one cares about it and also children are bapthised much older.
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  #25  
Old 07-19-2010, 11:39 AM
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I believe the same applies to the Russian Orthodox faith. I think the Tsar and Empress had to wait outside until the baptism of their child was complete.
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  #26  
Old 03-12-2011, 07:47 PM
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I would find it very odd if all British children were baptized with water from the actual Jordan River.

And, are you sure, Duchessmary, that this custom is in Russian Orthodoxy? In Greek Orthodoxy, the parents are present. I'm not sure where to check this fact, modern Russian orthodoxy might be quite different, considering the hiatus it had.

But surely, this must be broadly known by members of the faith.
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  #27  
Old 03-17-2011, 12:24 PM
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Actually, until the late 19th - early 20th century Greek Orthodox mothers were also not present in their children baptism, I have no idea why, but this practice has been abandoned for at least a century. So when the Grand Duchesses and Alexei were baptised , many Greek Orthodox mothers were doing the same with Alexandra and were missing the christening
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  #28  
Old 04-14-2011, 12:59 AM
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Explain This?



Not a royal orb and Aztecs on the right.
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  #29  
Old 10-17-2011, 12:38 AM
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Hmm... I can't think of a strange royal tradition. The ones mentioned in this thread are quite interesting, though.
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  #30  
Old 12-21-2015, 10:21 PM
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What is the history and the purpose(s) of the "rotting room" used for deceased Spanish royals? HM Queen Victoria Eugenia's (188? - 1969) remains will be the next to be removed from there (remains are placed there for 50 years) in 2019 and officially buried.
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  #31  
Old 12-21-2015, 10:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NotHRH View Post
What is the history and the purpose(s) of the "rotting room" used for deceased Spanish royals? HM Queen Victoria Eugenia's (188? - 1969) remains will be the next to be removed from there (remains are placed there for 50 years) in 2019 and officially buried.
Interesting read with some information

Morbid Monday: The Royal Rotting Room | Atlas Obscura
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  #32  
Old 12-21-2015, 11:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Princess Agnes View Post
About the presence of parents at christenings, a few decades ago in some catholic regions (I'm portuguese) the mother wouldn't be present at a baby's christening. For example, my grandmother stayed home during the christening of all her 4 children.

This has to do with some ancient traditions that forbade newmothers from entering a church for some time after birth (most places said 40 days I believe).
Nowadays no one cares about it and also children are bapthised much older.
Yes it was called being churched. Back in the days (If you watched the show the Tudors for instance you would see it on the show) women would go into seclusion for months before birthing the baby. And it was not until after 40 days, when the mother was cleansed of the birth, she could enter church again.

Back then of course they couldn't wait 40 days to baptize a baby. Babies were usually baptized within 3 days of life, because of high infant mortality. It is how many births are dated like Shakespeare. Births were not often registered, but baptisms were. So they often take 3 days off a baptism date for a figure like Shakespeare, to settle on his birth date.
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  #33  
Old 12-22-2015, 01:54 AM
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I know that when it comes time for High Sheriffs of counties in Britain to be chosen (nowadays it's a ceremonial role) Queen Elizabeth pricks out the names with a bodkin during a Privy Council meeting. That tradition dates from Elizabeth I, who was sitting embroidering when she was first asked to choose the names and used a bodkin to do so.
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  #34  
Old 12-22-2015, 02:16 AM
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You mean that Queen Elizabeth uses a needle to pick out sheriff's? Does she do embroidery or sew? I mean I know that in the past ladies of leisure, royals or nobles had to know how to do that for that was part of their job in making shirts /clothing for the family, but today's day and age? I can't see HM sewing in my mind, do we know it her mother did or that Queen Mary did? Don't get me wrong for I grew up with a needle and thread attached to me as a baby/child and can do all those things today thanks to my grandmother which I think is slowly becoming a lost art, so in my mind picturing HM with a needle and thread is hard. How would a person pick someone with a needle even that type of needle? If HM does do some needlework, that would be amazing, I actually carry my knitting on public transportation when I use it to keep me sane and from being bored.
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  #35  
Old 12-22-2015, 02:26 AM
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I don't think the Queen is a keen knitter or sewer, though apparently she and her sister Margaret were taught to sew and knit during the war. The Queen simply uses a needle called a bodkin to prick out the names of chosen High Sheriffs on a piece of parchment. (Their names are already written there.) The first Elizabeth was a very accomplished needle woman who was proud of her embroidery.
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  #36  
Old 12-22-2015, 04:02 AM
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Thank you for letting me know. I do remember that HM was a volunteer for the Red Cross I believe in WW2 and having that skill does come in handy during times like that. Now I understand what you mean, at first I was like what....I wonder if any of the women in the royal family today has developed the skill for the needle work arts for doing that is an art, it takes lot of time and patience to make something out of a needle and thread, I know for I do lots of needlework and some pieces can have over 200 colors of threads, try keeping all that in order, sometimes impossible.

Thank for the info on Queen Victoria and I wonder if any of her works has survived to this day? Would love to see it.
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  #37  
Old 12-22-2015, 04:05 AM
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Curryong:
I also love the fact that HM keeps the traditions alive to this day that were carried out by Queen Victoria, I strongly believe in keeping traditions alive for they are our heritage and history.
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  #38  
Old 12-22-2015, 04:40 AM
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Queen Elizabeth I was Queen of England and Wales between 1558 to 1603. She was the one who did embroidery and first used the bodkin. So the tradition of pricking the names has been going on for about 450 years.

Queen Victoria was Queen of Britain between 1837 and 1901.
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  #39  
Old 12-22-2015, 05:59 AM
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450 years and it is still being done.............AMAZING! sorry for the caps, that took me by surprise. Well I am glad to see that some traditions are still alive today. Thank you for letting me know, I have a few of those large needle and I use them for various things. Seriously doubt if any of Queen Elizabeth 1 needlework would still be around, but it would be something nice to see if it was....Many thanks for the info and conversation..
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  #40  
Old 12-22-2015, 06:24 AM
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Just on a whim I thought I'd see what I could come up with and found one piece of needlework that Elizabeth 1 did when she was still Princess Elizabeth and 11 years old.

Scroll down a bit in this link to see it.

ARTIFACTS of the Tudors - The Tudors Wiki

I think the most unusual tradition for me has to be the Hostage MP. One member of parliament is taken to and held hostage at Buckingham Palace before the Queen leaves for the State Opening of Parliament. It dates back to when the monarchy and parliament weren't on friendly terms.

If any monarchy embodies the history and traditions of the past, its the British hands down.
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