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  #21  
Old 08-19-2009, 12:23 PM
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I have always loved ethics, especially, concerning royal manners.
Thank you, Ashelen, for an amazing video!
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  #22  
Old 08-19-2009, 11:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lilytornado View Post
Yes, this is the American style, but in Europe there is no crossing over - you keep the fork in the left hand all the time and the knife in the right hand all the time.
Actually this is a good way to distinguish Americans and Europeans if you watch them eating (only if they know some manners though LOL)

Edit: I found this about
Eating utensil etiquette - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
My father uses the European etiquette with the fork in his left hand, facing down, and its very convenient. I think it looks nice too. Its almost as if its simpler and we can focus on the conversations rather than the more busy crossing over actions. There's probably fewer knives and forks dropped too.
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  #23  
Old 08-20-2009, 03:16 AM
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the arrangement of drinking glasses is in Europe different than in the video:
waterglas nearby, to its left white wine glass, behind it champagne/sparkling wine glass.
The red wine glass behind the white wine glass but a bit "out of the square" to the left.
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  #24  
Old 08-20-2009, 05:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ashelen View Post
I just was looking at this photo and I notice that the cuttlery is upside down at least for me:
4.jpg (image)
I always thought that in a formal dinner the forks would do the other way that there are in the photo, is anybody out there know about royal table settings and manners?
anyone has photos of formal table settings, specially royal tables? is any difference between countries for setting a table royal or not??
how we can set a nice table, very formal like the royals do and any other information related with this?
I know that between courses there are a person who pass a bowl with rose petals water to wash your hands, but i do not know if this is still in use or not, may be soembody out there can tell us more .
for the moderators , please if i put this in the wrong forum move it where should to go, thank you
Everyone has their own ideas about how to set a table formally or correctly or what the proper way to do things is and I had no idea about the French formal way of placing forks! I suppose it makes sense to place the fork with the prongs facing downwards because when you start eating the food, you will hold the fork in that way! At a dinner party, the main thing is to make your dinner guests as comfortable as possible and to keep your table as simple and elegant as possible - I went to a wedding reception once which had so many extra's on the table that to reach the butter dish your hand had to do a careful assault course through candles, vases, name cards, wine glasses, finger bowls and all sorts of things! It all looked so cluttered and got worse when the food arrived because everyone was so squashed up!

My only advice for a successful and elegant table setting:

Make sure all the crockery/plates/cutlery etc match
Ensure there is plenty of room between guests to avoid "elbowing"
Simply fold napkins into a rectangle
A bowl of flowers for a daytime event is elegant. In the evening use candles and on each place setting/folded napkin place a single flower

What do other people do?!
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  #25  
Old 08-20-2009, 10:22 AM
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Originally Posted by Jacknch View Post
Everyone has their own ideas about how to set a table formally or correctly or what the proper way to do things is and I had no idea about the French formal way of placing forks! I suppose it makes sense to place the fork with the prongs facing downwards because when you start eating the food, you will hold the fork in that way! At a dinner party, the main thing is to make your dinner guests as comfortable as possible and to keep your table as simple and elegant as possible - I went to a wedding reception once which had so many extra's on the table that to reach the butter dish your hand had to do a careful assault course through candles, vases, name cards, wine glasses, finger bowls and all sorts of things! It all looked so cluttered and got worse when the food arrived because everyone was so squashed up!

My only advice for a successful and elegant table setting:

Make sure all the crockery/plates/cutlery etc match
Ensure there is plenty of room between guests to avoid "elbowing"
Simply fold napkins into a rectangle
A bowl of flowers for a daytime event is elegant. In the evening use candles and on each place setting/folded napkin place a single flower

What do other people do?!
Thank you so much for your advice and it is true sometimes we are too close to eachother and your elbows touch the next person , this is very unconfortable!!! I think one thing would help is one one has guest to have somebody else serving, I hate everytime we have guests , mu husband is the cook and serve and he is so worry about the food and the serving and all that he hardly sit and eat or enjoy the meal or the guests , i am trying to convince him everytime we have a formal dinner to pay somebody to come and serve and take care of the kitchen even if he is doing the cooking! this stand up in and out of the table gets on my nervs!!!!!!!!!!!1
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  #26  
Old 08-20-2009, 02:07 PM
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How funny. Every night when the family sits down to dinner I always set a semi-formal table. With the plates, utensils, napkins and glasses, all facing the correct way/order. I use my everyday china and regular glass for drinking, but I always set the table, and now I'm teaching my daughter to do the same thing. (her new chore)
To me, a table is not complete unless it has all of this. I'm so retarded, that even when we use paper plates and plastic cups & utensils, I will still set the table this way!
And from reading this thread, I guess I'm teaching my daughter how to cut her meat the european way. It's too much for her fingers to do the cross over technique, so I just have her cut with her right hand and her fork in her left when she is a right handed person.
I'm glad to know that I'm teaching her something the right way rather than just the "easier" way.
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  #27  
Old 08-20-2009, 02:29 PM
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I think the American way is just as right as the European
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  #28  
Old 06-18-2010, 07:08 PM
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I just came across this thread, and here is the explanation to why forks and spoons are sometimes placed "upside down":
All silverware bears a stamp, and in most countries, you will find the stamp on the backside. In France and Italy, you will find the stamp on the front of forks and spoons. When setting a table, you always turn the stamp away from the guest. Therefore, silverware stamped in front will (or should be) always be facing down.
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  #29  
Old 12-07-2011, 06:20 PM
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I haven't posted here in a while, but just reading it occasionally, great forum btw. I am not sure if someone answered this already( I tried reading all the posts and couldn't see it) , but the placing on the forks upside down has nothing to do with the guests to feel comfortable and it's not only a french tradition either. It used to be a very common tradition between the European noble families, because they used to engrave their personal code of arms on the back of the forks and this way, when the guests came over, they were able to show the family code of arms in a way of a welcoming manner.
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  #30  
Old 01-01-2014, 01:03 AM
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Originally Posted by segolen View Post
I haven't posted here in a while, but just reading it occasionally, great forum btw. I am not sure if someone answered this already( I tried reading all the posts and couldn't see it) , but the placing on the forks upside down has nothing to do with the guests to feel comfortable and it's not only a french tradition either. It used to be a very common tradition between the European noble families, because they used to engrave their personal code of arms on the back of the forks and this way, when the guests came over, they were able to show the family code of arms in a way of a welcoming manner.
very interesting!Thank you so much! it is a great idea, I wonder how much work and expense to do that in the hole set of cutlery? I never saw one, any photos available to see ?
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  #31  
Old 01-14-2014, 05:27 PM
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Segolen that is correct! I did not see this being answered but between the different corses the sever will bring a personal bowl of water with petals for the washing of ones finger tips also another server will come around again in between corses and Crum the area,
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  #32  
Old 12-27-2016, 12:03 PM
eya eya is online now
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How to Host a Party Like Kate Middleton - Royal Hosting Etiquette
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  #33  
Old 12-27-2016, 12:14 PM
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Off topic, but I do wonder. If it is the thing to show up 10-15 minutes after the event start time and it is another the thing to call 2 minutes in advance of every minute that you will be late, does everyone call the hostess 30 minutes before the start of the party and explain that they will be fashionable?

I think this would make a smashing Math and Ethics question for 6th graders!
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  #34  
Old 12-27-2016, 05:32 PM
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It could be offered in the same textbook that explains the three second rule. "If it drops on the floor and you retrieve it in under three seconds, its still OK to eat."
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  #35  
Old 12-27-2016, 06:08 PM
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Originally Posted by AdmirerUS View Post
Off topic, but I do wonder. If it is the thing to show up 10-15 minutes after the event start time and it is another the thing to call 2 minutes in advance of every minute that you will be late, does everyone call the hostess 30 minutes before the start of the party and explain that they will be fashionable?

I think this would make a smashing Math and Ethics question for 6th graders!
Hmm... I feel like if it's the thing to show up 10-15 minutes late, then it's fair to assume that no party actually starts until 10-15 minutes after the official event start time. Therefore, unless you're going to be more than 10-15 minutes late you shouldn't have to pre-warn the host.

The real question is, if you're supposed to call 2 minutes in advance of every minute you're going to be late, and you're going to be 20 minutes later than the official start time, do you call 40 minutes ahead of the start time, 10 minutes ahead of the start time, or 5 minutes after the start time?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Osipi View Post
It could be offered in the same textbook that explains the three second rule. "If it drops on the floor and you retrieve it in under three seconds, its still OK to eat."
That should be an entire chapter. There's the basic "it's okay if you retrieve it under three seconds", but then the added dynamics of if it's your home, vs. someone else's home, hardwood/laminate vs. carpet, solid vs. soft or runnier food... and that's without considering how it applies to small children - the younger a person is, the longer you have. Three seconds for an adult, five for a teenager... I believe for toddlers/pre-schoolers the limit is "if you find the food before the dog finds the food, regardless of how old it is, it's still good unless an adult stops you from eating it."

What should also be discussed is the rules for double dipping.
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