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  #81  
Old 04-02-2018, 10:08 AM
Majesty
 
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Location: *******, Canada
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None of the debate is new. 117 years ago we were told the ‘young people’ would no longer support the monarchy after Victoria.

Here we are with her great-great granddaughter on the throne.
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  #82  
Old 04-02-2018, 10:23 AM
Heir Apparent
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitty1224 View Post
One mistakes I always did was look to the past to judge the future. You can’t do that always. Times change, people change. You can not simply flat out say thy will happen.

The higher international profile of Queen Elizabeth II (and, by extension, the BRF) compared to other sovereigns is due to multiple (rather straightforward) facts:

  1. Queen Elizabeth II is the Head of State not only of the United Kingdom, but also of 15 other countries, including Australia, Canada, New Zealand and various Caribbean countries, making her the only truly multinational/imperial monarch today.
  2. On top of that, Queen Elizabeth II is also the Head of the Commonwealth, which, in addition to the 16 realms where she is Queen, also includes, I think, 38 other countries, including important countries like India, South Africa, Nigeria, Pakistan, etc. That makes Queen Elizabeth II an icon in many different parts of the world.
  3. Queen Elizabeth II has also been on the throne for over 65 years, has traveled extensively all over the world and met most of the major world leaders of the past 50 years at least. That gives her a level of international exposure and recognition that is unmatched by another living Head of State.
  4. And, last but not least, it is true that the British Royal Family is the only RF that is widely known and covered in the United States (most Americans don't even know that Spain, Sweden or the Netherlands have a monarchy for example). Since most of the international media organizations with a global reach, because of the English-language advantage, are de facto based in the US or the UK (e.g. CNN, BBC, Sky/Fox, etc.) , the fact that the BRF is pretty much the only RF regularly covered by those outlets does make a difference in terms of international exposure, especially outside Europe.
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  #83  
Old 04-02-2018, 10:26 AM
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I think that popularity of the institution of the monarchy should be distinguished from the popularity of the individual monarch.

While it can't be denied that Charles is less popular than his mother and son, he is popular enough, and the institution is certainly popular enough, that I don't see the monarchy being abolished during his reign.

Now what will undoubtedly happen is that the UK will lose some dominion countries, but that will not be a reflection on Charles, it will be a reflection of the times.
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  #84  
Old 04-02-2018, 10:31 AM
Majesty
 
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Popularity of course is relative. Charles on his worst day is still more popular than the Prime Minister. Politicians are the greatest asset to hereditary monarchy.

Plus as stated, the ‘institution’ of monarchy is as strong as ever.
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  #85  
Old 04-02-2018, 10:55 AM
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Given that 'Possession is nine-tenths of the Law', the institution at the 'top' of the state is always in a better position than any potential rival.
In Britain for example [aside from the constitutional difficulties for instituting a Republic] COUNTLESS major changes would need to be made [and require SUPPORT from the Public].. 'Royal Air Force' to 'National Air Force', anyone ?

People are notoriously 'averse to change', so the re-naming of countless 'Household Names',familiar for generations, re-design of Uniforms, stationary,Law Courts, etc,etc is unlikely to be popular.[IMAGINE the financial cost] !

It will take some HUGE scandal or unimaginable cataclysm to persuade a MAJORITY of the virtues of such a radical change..
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  #86  
Old 04-02-2018, 11:53 AM
Heir Apparent
 
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Originally Posted by wyevale View Post
Given that 'Possession is nine-tenths of the Law', the institution at the 'top' of the state is always in a better position than any potential rival.
In Britain for example [aside from the constitutional difficulties for instituting a Republic] COUNTLESS major changes would need to be made [and require SUPPORT from the Public].. 'Royal Air Force' to 'National Air Force', anyone ?
People are notoriously 'averse to change', so the re-naming of countless 'Household Names',familiar for generations, re-design of Uniforms, stationary,Law Courts, etc,etc is unlikely to be popular.[IMAGINE the financial cost] !
It will take some HUGE scandal or unimaginable cataclysm to persuade a MAJORITY of the virtues of such a radical change..
.

The Monsrchy suffered two important setbacks in the 20th century when Ireland and, to a lesser extent, (white-ruled) South Africa became republics. If, in the next decades, Australia voted to become a republic, I believe it would send ripple effects not only to New Zealand and Canada obviously, but to the UK itself as it would be a practical example of the feasibility of a more or less seamless transition from the monarchy to a republic in a country that is still seen culturally as part of the “Anglosphere” , including renaming the Navy or Air Force, or removing references to the Crown from other elements of daily life , the law and state institutions.
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  #87  
Old 04-07-2018, 05:40 AM
Heir Presumptive
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Queen Claude View Post
I think that popularity of the institution of the monarchy should be distinguished from the popularity of the individual monarch.

While it can't be denied that Charles is less popular than his mother and son, he is popular enough, and the institution is certainly popular enough, that I don't see the monarchy being abolished during his reign.

Now what will undoubtedly happen is that the UK will lose some dominion countries, but that will not be a reflection on Charles, it will be a reflection of the times.
that's true. Charles isn't as popular as his mother.. who has achieved something of the admiration that the British traditionally give to people who have lived a long time and been around in public life for decades. He has been controversial at times and there are for some people issues about the ending of his first Marriage. however I agree that he's reasonably popular and the institution of Monarchy is generally tolerated and preferred in Britian to any alternative.
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