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  #141  
Old 11-27-2010, 04:41 PM
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Talking !

A few points:

I disagree with Hereditary Thane's statement that tiaras are not worn on private occasions. I have read that Queen Mary dined each night in full evening gown, jewels, including tiara.

Some etiquitte of tiaras:

1. At least in the English-speaking cultures, unmarried girls aren't supposed to wear tiaras. Their youth is considered more than sufficient adornment. They don tiaras for the first time on their wedding day, to hold the veil. (Anyway, that's the guideline I followed.) Similarly, the old rules say that young girls and young unmarried women shouldn't wear elaborate jewelry at all. Again, superfluous when youth is such a rare, fine adornment. Married ladies have lost their bloom, I suppose, and therefore need help from the diamonds!

2. A related rule I grew up with was that one did not wear diamonds during daylight hours. Unfair competition with the sun, I suppose. Queen Elizabeth II wears diamonds in daylight hours frequently. So I suppose this is not a valid rule anymore. If anybody would know, she would. And she's certainly not the sort of person who breaks rules recklessly!

3. One needn't have a royal or noble title in order to wear a tiara. And it is perfectly okay to borrow a tiara if you haven't got one of your own, or if Lady Mary's tiara looks better with Mrs Kennedy's dress than Mrs K's own tiara, for example.

4. My friend Carol is adamant that one NEVER EVER wears a tiara in a hotel. EVER. But I've seen photographs of royal ladies in tiaras at events supposedly in hotels, so maybe this is a rule in the US only?
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  #142  
Old 11-28-2010, 03:02 AM
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Platinum is a very, very heavy metal, and I would think that a platinum tiara would weigh far too much to be comfortable for anyone to wear. Also it's extremely expensive, though for royalty that probably wouldn't be a problem...but yes, weight---I own a very fine, thin platinum neckchain to wear small pendants on, and it weighs amazingly much more than gold chains that are far thicker and more ornate.
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  #143  
Old 01-10-2011, 03:44 PM
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this thread may belong to the jewllery forum

i have heard one never wears a tiara in hotel, but is there not return dinners at state visit sometimes in a hotel?
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  #144  
Old 01-10-2011, 05:31 PM
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The rule about not wearing a tiara in an hotel is possibly somewhat out of date. I remember being taught that since tiaras were only worn by members of the nobility who would never have need of such a mundane thing as an hotel anyone wearing a tiara in an hotel was obviously not really entitled to do so.
I think this so called rule is not valid any longer since as you point out many functions to which one might properly wear a tiara are nowadays held in hotels.
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  #145  
Old 01-10-2011, 05:40 PM
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Another rule which is no longer observed is that unmarried women don't wear tiaras. Afaik both Princess Margaret and Princess Anne wore tiaras before their wedding. And if we don't see the York girls in tiaras is because there are no white ties galas that they attend. If the Queen would have a white tie dinner for her jubilee, both Bea and Eugenie, and maybe also Zara would don a tiara without being married. Alas, I can't prove this theory because of the lack of tiara events!
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  #146  
Old 01-10-2011, 06:38 PM
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Oh there was that rubbish about how young girls shouldn't wear diamonds too. I think much of that isn't in force any longer as long as the tiaras or other jewelry is appropriate and not garish.
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  #147  
Old 02-08-2011, 06:50 PM
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Tiaras or no Tiaras?

Hi, I hope I've put this in the right place.

I'm trying to help my son find out why at some royal weddings that he's seen on You Tube, like Crown Princess Victoria's and Crown Prince Frederik's, the female guests wear tiaras whereas at others they do not.

He's mostly curious to know if it is that the British Royal Family do not wear tiaras to weddings or if it's for another reason. We've looked online and I think it's to do with the dress code perhaps, but I'm hoping someone can answer him better than I.

Thanks
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  #148  
Old 02-08-2011, 07:03 PM
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I think that when the wedding is a morning affair, with a luncheon following then no tiaras are worn, whereas when it is a noon affair and with an evening dinner tiaras are worn, I suppose it also follows what is tradition in that country. In the UK there will probably be a state banquet before the wedding which will be a tiara clad one, and the wedding not. In Denmark and Sweden the private celebrations b4 the wedding were of 2 types, state banquets with the heads of states and parliament and private celebrations, The private ones were dress, but no tiara, and the state banquets were tiara worn, each as they are accustemed, and of course the wedding was tiara and full regalia
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  #149  
Old 02-08-2011, 07:08 PM
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Thank you Auntie.

I knew there would be a protocol about it and I totally forgot about morning dress. So for ladies a morning wedding would mean a hat and an afternoon wedding would be when it could be a tiara.

Thanks
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  #150  
Old 02-09-2011, 03:53 AM
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In most cases an afternoon Wedding means the dresscode is white tie. But not always. For example the Wedding of Edward and Sophie or Peter Phillips and Autumn where bot in the afternoon but the dresscode was not white tie.
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  #151  
Old 02-09-2011, 08:59 AM
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In general the Scandinavian RFs' weddings are tiara-wearing events, while all the other European RFs' are not.
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  #152  
Old 03-11-2011, 12:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by missmaggy View Post
A few points:
1. .....Similarly, the old rules say that young girls and young unmarried women shouldn't wear elaborate jewelry at all. Again, superfluous when youth is such a rare, fine adornment. Married ladies have lost their bloom, I suppose, and therefore need help from the diamonds!
And what about older and mature old maids( who were also a commom thing back in the old days when the old rules applied)? I suppose a 50 years old woman who had lost her youth and the chance to marry should have been somehow compensated . On the other hand I don't I have ever seen a picture of Princess Vctoria ( QAlexandra's daughter) wearing a "real" tiara, only airgrettes
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  #153  
Old 03-11-2011, 12:55 PM
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You mean 'aigrettes'? These are popular and don't always have to include
Feathers although that is usually the theme. Pretty!
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  #154  
Old 04-07-2011, 01:11 PM
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Tiara traditions, protocol, history and meanings

Recently with the upcoming wedding between Prince William of the UK and Catherine Middleton, it has brought up several questions and musing about tiaras. When is one worn, when is one appropriate and who gets to wear one.

Someone has asked for a link to a photo of Princess Anee wearing a tiara before her marriage. Going lurking about I did find this site and think it has a wealth of information on the tiaras of the United Kingdom.

More British Royal Tiaras - The Tudors Wiki
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  #155  
Old 05-05-2011, 06:34 AM
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Jewellery in the hair (such as tiaras) used to be associated with white tie occasions, including private ones. It used to be common among certain classes to wear white tie to dinner every night (hence Queen Mary in a tiara at family dinners).
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  #156  
Old 05-08-2011, 10:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josefine View Post
this thread may belong to the jewllery forum

i have heard one never wears a tiara in hotel, but is there not return dinners at state visit sometimes in a hotel?

I've posted quite a bit about Tiaras on various other threads here!

What MissMaggy sets out above is basically correct so far as the BRF is concerned. The General Rule is that Tiaras are only worn at White Tie Occasions and by married women. This rule is varied on occasion - the most recent occasion I can think of is at the party the Queen gave in 1990 to celebrate the birthdays of the Queen Mother, Princess Margaret, Princess Royal and Prince Andrew. The dress code was Black Tie or Lounge suit [because of the wide variety of people invited, not just Royals and nobility, but many 'ordinary' people with a connection to the BRF who might not have had 'White Tie'. However, because the Queen knows that people with Tiaras love to wear them [and the opportunities for doing so are so limited now] she decreed that Tiaras could be worn at this party even though the dress code was Black, not White Tie.

Also the general rule that only married women could wear tiaras is waived to allow a bride to wear a Tiara at her marriage ceremony, even though she arrives as an unmarried woman.

As to the general rule that Tiaras are not worn at hotels, this rule has been reiterated in recent times by Wartski's managing director and Tiara expert Geoffrey Munn. I think that this has been modified though for two reasons: as Josefine states, there is the 'State Dinner exception'. I cannot speak about other Royal Families, but so rar as the British Royal Family is concerned, when there is a State Visit, the Queen [as hostess] throws a State Banquet for the visiting head. By convention, the Visiting Head then has to reciprocate, at the following or subsequent night. Very often, these 'return matches' are held at the Embassy or High Commission of the nation concerned; however, not ALL of these Embassies / High Commissions are large enough to hold all the guests: for this reason, an hotel is sometimes used: from memory, this is almost ALWAYS Claridges. Hotels hosting these 'return fixtures' are therefore standing in the place of Embassies / High Commissions.

[This does not really fit in here, as it is not about tiaras, but I can remember being amused when the French President cut his State Visit to Great Britain down to the bear minimum of one night, which meant that he in fact failed to host the 'return match' dinner for the Queen! Very much Lese Majeste!]

The other reason for tiara wearing at white tie events in hotels is of course a matter of practicality, because many of the noble families of the United Kingdom no longer have the traditional large London home that they used to [ Grosvenor House, the Dorchester, Spencer House etc] to entertain in! Many of these grand houses have now been redeveloped as hotels, or in the case of Spencer House, as venue for events, including Corporate 'events'. For this reason, many families who hold large parties / balls do so at hotels, because the traditional family home no longer exists in many cases, with aristocratic families often retaining only(!) a large apartment.



As a matter of interest, it is said that the Queen only ever visits three hotels: Claridges, The Ritz and the former Hyde Park hotel [now the Mandarin Oriental]. I can remember a little talk before the wedding about whether the Queen would go to the party the Middletons were throwing at the Goring, with many people saying that the Queen would not, because she never visits the Goring, although it was actually one of the Queen Mother's favourite hotels.

There is one other tiara-wearing-in hotels exception that I should mention: the London Debutante Season. This is mostly dead now, but even when I was 17, although presentations at court had long ceased, some form of London Season still limped on, and one of the important events was Queen Charlotte's Ball. This was a white tie event, and took place in the Grosvenor House Hotel. It commerated the Birthday of Queen Charlotte and was in fact an important fundraising occasion for Queen Charlotte's hosptial. The climax of the event was when the debutantes made a curtesy before the presiding Peeress, who was chosen annually to be Queen Charlotte's representative. The Peeress in question stood by a large cake, and received debutantes making their curtesy - the press always got it wrong and spoke of 'girls curtseying to a cake', but the press was very wrong, as the young girls were curtesying to the Peeress, who was actually there in her capacity as Queen Charlotte's Representative, and so the girls were technically NOT curtseying to the Peeress as peeress, but to the Peeress in her capacity as Queen Charlotte's representative. Anyway, the Peeress always wore a tiara, and the Grosvenor House was very much a hotel!

Hope some of this helps,

Alex
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  #157  
Old 05-16-2011, 08:48 PM
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I have a few books about royal jewels--Suzy Menkes, Leslie Field and a few on the Romanovs. Are there any others that you could recommend?
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  #158  
Old 05-17-2011, 12:24 PM
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See the Royal Library and the thread Royal Jewels.
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  #159  
Old 05-25-2011, 09:49 PM
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Thank you! I found a treasure trove of information in the Royal Jewels.
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  #160  
Old 06-27-2011, 12:52 PM
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On Diamonds and Settings...

Quote:
Originally Posted by MARG View Post
Looking at the Boucheron, the RFO and the bracelet it seems that their quality is far superior to that of the earrings and the necklace. The colour just seems so much more brilliant and multi-faceted, almost as if they have an age and style in common. Has anyone any ideas?
All the diamonds Camilla is wearing are white. There can often be a difference in disbursement due to the cutting and placement. The stones closer to the light are going to sparkle more.

Also, it also matters what metal the stones are set in. Brightest in silver, then white gold, then platinum or palladium, then yellow gold. Sometimes it is difficult to tell what the framing material is, especially if the prong tips are white --- which they normally are.
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