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  #301  
Old 08-20-2010, 05:35 AM
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Originally Posted by wedmonds View Post
I think that if the UK ever became a republic (highly-unlikely) that the Queen would move to Australia...
Reading this I get a picture in my mind. IF by chance this did happen, I can see the Queen very happily retiring to her beloved Balmoral in Scotland. I truly believe she loves it there.
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  #302  
Old 08-21-2010, 02:47 AM
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Originally Posted by wedmonds View Post

Or there is a chance that all of the Commonwealth Realms will get together and sign a treaty that will end the monarchy in all of their countries. And they all at once become republics?
Well I still think this is a very good option ^ once the UK becomes a republic
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  #303  
Old 08-21-2010, 04:02 AM
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In Australia and Canada, the monarchy cannot be ended by treaty. There is a formal constitutional amendment process in both countries (and possibly more) that would have to be gone through.
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  #304  
Old 08-22-2010, 01:08 AM
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Originally Posted by wbenson View Post
In Australia and Canada, the monarchy cannot be ended by treaty. There is a formal constitutional amendment process in both countries (and possibly more) that would have to be gone through.
Yes you are correct, I put incorrect information by suggesting the monarchy could be ended by treaty. In both of those countries you have mentioned I think the Provincial/State governments in different parts of the country all have to pass legislature granting the abolition of the monarchy. And then after that the federal government has to "okay" it NATIONWIDE all over the country. It is a long process that would take a few years (which is a very long time). I just looked it up, thanks for correcting me!
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  #305  
Old 08-22-2010, 01:13 AM
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Another way the monarchy could be put to end is if a Prime Minister and Governor-General team up to form some type of dictatorship and use their powers to take over the country. Together they could disband parliament and cause a constitutional crisis. Making themselves President and Prime Minister over the country. Form a new constitution, but I HIGHLY DOUBT THIS WILL EVER HAPPEN. Just another possibility.
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  #306  
Old 08-22-2010, 04:18 AM
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In Australia it is simpler than that.

It is a referendum of the people that requires two conditions to be met:

1) a majority of the population (50% + 1 - so out of 14,000,000 7,000,001 would meet the first point)
2) a majority of the states (4/6 states have to also have a majority in favour - the two territories don't count here).

If we got that (we didn't in 1999 where neither condition was met) then we would become a republic.

The legislation reguired would be in the federal government to set up the referendum and no state legislation would be needed as it would be automatic once it happened federally.
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  #307  
Old 08-28-2010, 06:09 PM
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Australia not ready for a republic until after Queen Elizabeth II

Public support for a republic has slumped to a 16-year low with more Australians in favour of retaining the monarchy for now.
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  #308  
Old 08-28-2010, 06:58 PM
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Originally Posted by wbenson View Post
Australia not ready for a republic until after Queen Elizabeth II

Public support for a republic has slumped to a 16-year low with more Australians in favour of retaining the monarchy for now.

As you read the article there are some interesting figures - it isn't so much that Australians are in favour of keeping the monarchy indefinitely but rather when it should end.

- 31 per cent said Australia should never become a republic.
- 29 per cent said Australia should become a republic as soon as possible.
- 34 per cent said Australia should become a republic only after Queen Elizabeth II's reign ends.

Only 31% of Australians now support keeping the monarchy indefinitely and 63% want us to be a republic according to the poll - it is a question of timing not fact. That also leave 6% undecided. On that basis a simple 'Do you think that Australia should become a republic?' question put to the Australian people would get a resounding 'Yes' vote.
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  #309  
Old 08-29-2010, 06:31 AM
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Putting off constitutional change is just a way of deflecting the issue, the current reality in Australia is that the push for a republic has all but died down. The perceptions that the media (especially the non Australian media) like to give is that Australia is right on the edge of declaring itself a republic.

That's not the case. Julia Gillard 2 weeks ago to the Canberra Press Club was asked about Australia becoming a republic. Her reply made a small article in print media no online. She said that unlike in the 1990s there is no major movement for a republic, no public push, currently there is no great call for constitutional change. By deferring questions on the republic by saying 'wait until the Queen passes' was better than saying 'well I'm a republican but it's not likely to happen'. Politicians choose what issues to push often based on what is of high importance to the public at large. This was well illustrated in the 1990s when Australia had a monarchist Prime Minister and yet public lobbying meant that a referendum on constitutional change was called. If there were major support and interest in a republic right now, then that's when the referendum or plebiscite would be called. The fact that Bob Brown's call was defeated last year in the Senate showed that there isn't a call and the elected government members didn't vote for it shows that the support is not there.

Kevin Rudd when he was campaigning for PM said he would have a referendum, as soon as he was elected that changed to 'not in his first term of office' it then progressed to 'not until the Queen passes' and that's the line his successor has gone with. Had their been support for constitutional change then it would not have been pushed into a nebulus future. (who knows when the Queen will die? The process takes time, will it even succeed?)

Last year being that it was 10 years since the referendum, various polling took place. The information from their polls showed that support for the republic dropped, support for the monarchy remained static, but what actually increased was those who didn't care, and saw no need for change. In 1999 the age group that was the main supporter of a republic was the 19 to 29 year group, in 2009 it was the 29 to 39 year group. So the same age group remains the strongest supporters of a republic and what's happened in 10 years is that they've aged a decade, but younger people have not joined the support for a republic. From my experience with that young adult age group constitutional change is not a priority with them. Environmental issues, climate change, financial issues--being able to own their own homes, globilisation are the issues that are important to them. Republic or the status quo has no impact on their lives or their futures, therefore it's not something that they are going to lobby for or push for.

It's this type of lack of interest that frustrates members of the republican movement (which at the moment has its lowest membership), the media deferring the decision on a republic until after the Queen dies is an attempt not to admit defeat. OK so you don't want a republic now, how about we put it to you, after the Queen dies?

It's easy to say Australians won't vote for a republic now as they have respect and admiration for the Queen, but then does that mean that during the 1990s Australians had no respect or admiration for the Queen and so lobbied for a referendum on the republic? No. it's all in the timing, and the momentum for the push for a republic has passed.
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  #310  
Old 08-29-2010, 07:02 AM
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I wonder whether Bob Brown will put up his private member's bill again when his party controls the Senate (which they didn't do last time and which is why it was defeated).

Based on the kids I have taught over the last 10 years - sure the republic isn't high on their agenda but consistently they have been strongly supportive of a republic. We teach the Republican debate as part of the compulsory NSW History course (although many schools don't) and we run a mock referendum each year even asking the parents to vote as if they were doing absentee votes. We also include in the package for parents questionsd relating to how they voted in 1999 and whether or not their views have changed and why (all anonymously of course). We even have had parents who have done this three or four times now due to number of children and some of them have been interesting as to when they changed their views (if they did).


We are now running over 90% for a republic but we are in a high migrant area where 'spot the Aussie' (a person of British or Northern European descent) is a regular pasttime in the classroom, streets etc. Reasons for changing from monarchist to republican include - Charles wedding to Camilla, Mary's marriage to Frederick (they are so much more loving than the BRF so get rid of the BRF), defeat of Howard government and recently the deposition of Kevin Rudd. Personally I changed because of this, and other royal foras on which I post, from ardent monarchist to 'bring on the republic as soon as possible'.

No matter how you slice the figures or the arguments about timing the majority of Australians want to be a republic at some time in the future and the Queen's death seems likely to trigger a new push if one doesn't come sooner. I would doubt that William will be King of Australia (thank goodness).
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  #311  
Old 08-29-2010, 07:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iluvbertie View Post
... a simple 'Do you think that Australia should become a republic?' question put to the Australian people would get a resounding 'Yes' vote.
Not quite. The article in the Sun-Herald also stated:

"A Sun-Herald/Nielson poll two weeks before the federal election [held on 21 August] showed that - when asked straight out if Australia should become a republic -
48% of the 1400 respondents opposed a constitutional change (a rise of 8% since 2008)
44% said we should change (a drop of 8% since 2008).
Backing for a republic is at its lowest since 1994."

Of course the responses will depend entirely upon the wording of the question asked, but as I posted back on the 17th of August, the republic issue is off the political agenda.
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  #312  
Old 08-29-2010, 07:34 AM
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And yet over 60% say become a republic now or when the Queen dies in the same article.
Something doesn't quite gel.
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  #313  
Old 08-29-2010, 07:46 AM
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As I said, the wording of the question will produce different responses.
A question such as "Do you want an Australian republic?" will get quite a different answer to "Are you in favour of constitutional change to bring about an Australian republic?" or "Should an Australian republic wait until the death of the Queen?" or "Should the constitution be rewritten to make Australia a republic?"

What we can say for sure is that at the moment neither of the two major political parties is interested in raising the issue.
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  #314  
Old 08-29-2010, 09:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Warren View Post
As I said, the wording of the question will produce different responses.
A question such as "Do you want an Australian republic?" will get quite a different answer to "Are you in favour of constitutional change to bring about an Australian republic?" or "Should an Australian republic wait until the death of the Queen?" or "Should the constitution be rewritten to make Australia a republic?"

What we can say for sure is that at the moment neither of the two major political parties is interested in raising the issue.
Totally agree that it depends on how it is worded.

For me I have to say that although I would support a republic if it was put to the vote I am not bothered that it is not being raised at the moment.

Personally I am more concerned about the cost of housing, increased costs of living etc which affect me everyday rather than something that does not impact on my day to day life. Although Australians I believe do support a republic I personally think that a lot of people are doing it tough financially at the moment (at least in the area I am in) and would not appreciate the costs involved in becoming a republic.

In the recent election there was a lot of debate on which party wasted the most money and I think that the cost of becoming a republic would also potentially come into this category at the moment although once the GFC is over maybe the mood will change again.

This is all just my opinion of course.
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  #315  
Old 12-31-2010, 10:19 PM
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Queen extends sympathies to flood victims - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

The Queen has sent a message to the her representative in Queensland, HE The Governor Penelope Wensley in regards to the devestating floods currently impacting vast areas of the state.

The full text of the Queen's Message
Message following the flooding in Queensland, Australia, 31 December 2010
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  #316  
Old 01-04-2011, 07:58 AM
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God Save the Queen of Australia!
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  #317  
Old 01-04-2011, 08:03 AM
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When the Republican issue arises. Do we not have an obligation through being subjects of Her Majesty, the Queen our Sovereign to support her. Do we not have a duty to serve her when the question arises and to defend her. Is she now our Sovereign Lady...our source of unity, the living, alive symbol of our nation of peoples. Does she not represent all people of society. She is our Sovereign, our Queen, our Lady we must defend her. No Government shall rid us of our Sovereign Lady...they do not have the power in my eyes. I believe when the Republic comes...the Monarch of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, they shall always be our Sovereign and Monarch. Always. He/She shall remain in my and I hope our hearts. They cannot take Her away from us. I believe even though she may not play a major role..in this Realm or her Own Realm she plays a major part in symbolism and in Name.

In my eyes....to rid the Monarchy of Australia..to rid its Sovereign from this Realm is an act of high treason.
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  #318  
Old 01-04-2011, 08:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Iluvbertie View Post
As you read the article there are some interesting figures - it isn't so much that Australians are in favour of keeping the monarchy indefinitely but rather when it should end.

- 31 per cent said Australia should never become a republic.
- 29 per cent said Australia should become a republic as soon as possible.
- 34 per cent said Australia should become a republic only after Queen Elizabeth II's reign ends.

Only 31% of Australians now support keeping the monarchy indefinitely and 63% want us to be a republic according to the poll - it is a question of timing not fact. That also leave 6% undecided. On that basis a simple 'Do you think that Australia should become a republic?' question put to the Australian people would get a resounding 'Yes' vote.
Is it not true...as subjects of HM the Queen, our Sovereign we are too respect and love whomever holds the office of Monarch...whether it be The Prince of Wales or The Queen.

You respect the office.
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  #319  
Old 01-05-2011, 05:31 AM
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HM the Queen and Prime Minister Julia Gillard

I wonder when and if, Prime Minister Julia Gillard is going to meet Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II, Queen of Australia. Maybe she might go to Buckingham Palace or it might be CHOGM 2010.
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  #320  
Old 01-05-2011, 05:34 AM
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Her Majesty, The Queen and Australia

I wonder whether Her Majesty, will do a visit to Australia and its States. Does anyone know?
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