The Royal Forums Coat of Arms

Go Back   The Royal Forums > Reigning Houses > British Royals > Queen Elizabeth II and the Duke of Edinburgh

Join The Royal Forums Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
  #201  
Old 08-29-2009, 02:41 AM
Courtier
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 802
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skydragon View Post
It was indeed HM I was talking about, but also the right to a visa, either because they hold UK citizenship or on an ancestry claim.
The right to a working holiday visa for young Australians isn't restricted to just Britain. Australians can also get a working holiday visa for Japan, as well as young Japanese being entitled to a working holiday visa for Australia. (Just as UK citizens can get a working holiday visa for Australia, it's a reciprocal agreement between countries)

Australia recognises dual citizenship as since young Australians are a very mobile population many opt for a EU passport as that makes life easier to work and in the UK or Europe (no need for a visa) So passports by ancestry aren't just claimed by Australians with British grandparents, but also Australians with grandparents from other EU countries which allow dual citizenship.

Neither the working holiday visas nor British passports by ancestry are sought after because people want a connection with the UK but rather as a means to an end. The mobile young adult who wants to broaden their horizons.
__________________

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #202  
Old 08-29-2009, 05:31 AM
Roslyn's Avatar
Heir Presumptive
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Tintenbar, Australia
Posts: 2,629
I think you might find that the older Australians who are entitled to visas because of their ancestry may be at least partly motivated by a desire to maintain their connection with the UK. There are at least two categories that I am aware of: Ancestry Visas which you can apply for with one British grandparent, but you have to work there on this one, and right of abode visas, which require a British parent, and you don't have to work with one of those.
__________________

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #203  
Old 08-29-2009, 09:48 AM
Skydragon's Avatar
Imperial Majesty
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: London and Highlands, United Kingdom
Posts: 10,943
If and when any country becomes a republic, IMO dual citizenship availability is should be withdrawn immediately. The very stringent controls Australia has in place regarding work visas, should be introduced in the UK, as should the 'repatriation' of Australian workers, no longer required because of the recession, (a move already implemented by Australia).

I can't see any problems for Britain when Australia becomes a republic, nor can I see what difference it would make in reality to Australians, not to have HM addressed as Queen of Australia.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #204  
Old 08-29-2009, 06:28 PM
Roslyn's Avatar
Heir Presumptive
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Tintenbar, Australia
Posts: 2,629
I have very mixed feelings about the issue.

I was born a British Subject, and my father's parents were both English. My mother's family came out a generation before that, but they all came to live in a British Colony. My ancestors on both sides lie in English soil (and a few in Scotland and Ireland). My blood is British; British history is my history.

On the other hand, the majority of Australian citizens now have no such links with Britain, and the younger ones who do have been brought up in a different society and taught differently at school and don't feel a special connection to Britain. Similarly, a significant part of the British population is now comprised of people who are not of Anglo-Saxon-Celtic blood and they wouldn't give a hoot about us and wouldn't see any reason why we should have any special rights. Britain is now looking towards Europe, and has no formal interest in its former Colonies.

Both countries have changed in many ways politically and demographically over the last half century or so during my lifetime. Both have changed direction and become melting pots for want of a better expression, and neither can give preference to its parents/children as the case may be, any longer.

You've kicked us out of the nest and don't want to let us back in. And if you won't let us go back "home" when we want to go back, I want my own distinctly Australian, Head of State, because at present when both countries are represented together on the world stage at State level we don't have our own Head of State. We share the same person and she is always going to put her own countrymen first. It didn't matter in the past when we were special to Britain, but we aren't any more.

And the part of me that remembers with affection when God Save the Queen was our National Anthem and the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council was our highest appeal Court, doesn't like it at all.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #205  
Old 08-29-2009, 06:40 PM
Iluvbertie's Avatar
Majesty
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Bathurst, Australia
Posts: 8,443
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skydragon View Post
If and when any country becomes a republic, IMO dual citizenship availability is should be withdrawn immediately. The very stringent controls Australia has in place regarding work visas, should be introduced in the UK, as should the 'repatriation' of Australian workers, no longer required because of the recession, (a move already implemented by Australia).

I can't see any problems for Britain when Australia becomes a republic, nor can I see what difference it would make in reality to Australians, not to have HM addressed as Queen of Australia.

Most Australians who have dual citizenship don't hold British and Australian citizenship but that of their homelands.

For most Aussies of British descent they were born here and so are Australian by birth and haven't considered taking British as well (although many younger ones do due to ability to work in the EU).

Many Australians have come from other countries and keep that citizenship and take out (or being born here gain automatically) Australian citizenship.

Last year I surveyed my Year 10 classes - total 52 students (2 classes) and over 60 nationalities. About 30% are not Australian citizens due to not being born here and parents refusing to take Australian citizenship at this stage (some not yet eligible as well as haven't lived here long enough) but of the 52 students 45 hold citizenship other than Australian and none hold British citizenship. The 7 who are only Australian are also the only kids from totally British backgrounds.

When Australia becomes a republic there will be no need to change the laws regarding dual or even multiple citizenship (some students I teach have four - Greece, Malta, Lebanon and Australian is one child due to grandparents).

Until the 1970s (if my memory serves me correctly) Australians weren't allowed to hold dual citizenship but that changed as we became more multicultural.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #206  
Old 08-29-2009, 09:11 PM
Courtier
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 802
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skydragon View Post
If and when any country becomes a republic, IMO dual citizenship availability is should be withdrawn immediately...
Republics also allow dual citizenship, Italy for example is a republic and yet allows its citizens to hold dual or multiple citizenships, from other republics as well!
Quote:
Until the 1970s (if my memory serves me correctly) Australians weren't allowed to hold dual citizenship but that changed as we became more multicultural.
Until 1972 Australians were British subjects and Australian citizens and travelled on British passports, after 1972 Australian passports were issued. The Whitlam government brought it in, prior to 1949 all Australians were just British subjects, there was no Australian citizenship. Dual citizenship was brought in as other countries allowed their citizens to keep their citizenship when they became Australian citizens. Beforehand certain countries required you to renounce your old citizenship if you became an Australian citizen. This was the case with Italy as I counsel frustrated young people (who want to work overseas) who have Italian born grandparents and parents and find they can't get an Italian passport (EU one) through descent as prior to 1992 the Italian government required that you renounce your Italian citizenship if you took on Australian. Their parents and grandparents became proud Australians on paper and their descendents lost forever the right to dual citizenship, those that became Australian citizens after 1992( due to change in Italian law, not Australian) can get dual citizenship. The British government always has allowed for dual citizenship and many young people then qualify and get their EU passport by having just one British born grandparent.

Quote:
Most Australians who have dual citizenship don't hold British and Australian citizenship but that of their homelands.
I think you'll find that for adult Australians who have dual, one of those citizenships is Australian, simply if they work overseas for extended periods they risk loosing their permanent residence status in Australia. I have dual citizenship, one being Australian, one EU (not British) and I qualify for another throught descent. I could have also qualified for permanent residence status for another country due to time spent living and working there, I'm not that unusual when looking at young mobile professionals, thanks to Australia's multicultural nature being able to move and work worldwide isn't an unusual situation.


I have no British descent or history and am quite happy for Australian to stay a Consitutional Monarchy and be spared totally unnecessary expense. In all honesty it would make no difference to have a president or Governor-General except for the cost. First the cost of having the public debate and referendum, the 1999 one cost well over a million dollars, ( as far as I'm concerned money better spent on education, rural health care, road, disablity services, all of which actually make a real difference in people's lives) If Australia becomes a republic the model that seems to have the most support is the elected president, so then there's the cost of a political campaign by the candidates, all funded with government money. (which again could be better spent) Then finally when the president retires, he or she receives a pension for life, along with other perks, more money! The office of the Italian president (purely ceremonial) currently costs more to run than the monarchy does in the UK, it's a good comparison as the population is about the same, Italians are also paying for the pensions of at least 3 former presidents who are still alive.
For a figurehead Head of State, currently money is not spent on campaigns, the monarch inherits, the governors-general are appointed, the role is ceremonial, spend money on things that actually affect Australians in their daily lives.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #207  
Old 08-30-2009, 05:52 AM
Skydragon's Avatar
Imperial Majesty
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: London and Highlands, United Kingdom
Posts: 10,943
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iluvbertie View Post
When Australia becomes a republic there will be no need to change the laws regarding dual or even multiple citizenship
On that we will have to agree to differ.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlotte1
Republics also allow dual citizenship, Italy for example is a republic and yet allows its citizens to hold dual or multiple citizenships, from other republics as well! - The British government always has allowed for dual citizenship and many young people then qualify and get their EU passport by having just one British born grandparent.
Why when many Australians want a republic, would they want to hold on to anything other than an Australian passport? The Italian example is wonderful I am sure but Britain is not Italy.

Lets see Britain implement stringent rules regarding dual nationality when Australia becomes a republic, it is almost as bad as the plastic Scots.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #208  
Old 08-30-2009, 07:04 AM
Iluvbertie's Avatar
Majesty
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Bathurst, Australia
Posts: 8,443
Why should we have to change our laws because we become a republic and break any sort of links with Britain?
What laws we have will be for us and whether we are a republic or not will not enter into it.
Most people with dual or multi-national citizenship aren't British anyway so why would they have to give up something they have been able to do for the last 30 years?
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #209  
Old 08-30-2009, 07:22 AM
Skydragon's Avatar
Imperial Majesty
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: London and Highlands, United Kingdom
Posts: 10,943
I am not suggesting Australia change her rules, I am suggesting Britain does!
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #210  
Old 08-30-2009, 07:42 PM
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Melbourne & Sydney, Australia
Posts: 3,983
I was born in Australia though have spent alot of time either living or travelling between here and the UK. My father was born and bred there, my parents own considerable property in London, I've worked there and I also hold a British passport.

Should Australia become a republic, I'd be quite disheartened if I should have to relinquish my dual-citizenship which has served me, and my life, most significantly. To me, it's provided an entirely personal opportunity to live as a dual citizen and has benefited me and my career well.

It's something which means alot to me. I'm an Australian lady with a bi-cultural (global) upbringing and I appreciate that fact.
__________________

"Dressing is a way of life" - Monsieur Saint Laurent
Reply With Quote
  #211  
Old 09-01-2009, 09:41 AM
Commoner
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Los Angeles, United States
Posts: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skydragon View Post
On that we will have to agree to differ.
Why when many Australians want a republic, would they want to hold on to anything other than an Australian passport? The Italian example is wonderful I am sure but Britain is not Italy.

Lets see Britain implement stringent rules regarding dual nationality when Australia becomes a republic, it is almost as bad as the plastic Scots.
Yes, the Italians are steadfast! Are the Australians worse?
_________________________

LIFE IS GOOD!
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #212  
Old 09-02-2009, 05:08 AM
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Melbourne & Sydney, Australia
Posts: 3,983
Quote:
Originally Posted by olla86 View Post
Are the Australians worse?!
Could you elaborate, please?
__________________

"Dressing is a way of life" - Monsieur Saint Laurent
Reply With Quote
  #213  
Old 09-04-2009, 08:16 AM
Commoner
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Los Angeles, United States
Posts: 10
I mean that Australians have all rights to make own country a republic.
__________________
These games are the best!
Reply With Quote
  #214  
Old 09-04-2009, 06:15 PM
Lumutqueen's Avatar
Imperial Majesty
Royal Blogger
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Carlton, York, United Kingdom
Posts: 17,105

They do have all the rights to make their country a republic, but as of yet they haven't acted on those rights.
__________________
We Will Remember Them.
Reply With Quote
  #215  
Old 10-26-2009, 01:34 AM
Lighthouse's Avatar
Nobility
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 383
What is meant by 'when Australia becomes a republic it's almost as bad as the plastic Scots'? I don't understand the figure of speech.
__________________
Denial ain't just a river in Egypt.
- Mark Twain
Reply With Quote
  #216  
Old 10-26-2009, 06:13 AM
Skydragon's Avatar
Imperial Majesty
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: London and Highlands, United Kingdom
Posts: 10,943
The full quote might help.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #217  
Old 11-15-2009, 07:06 AM
Australian's Avatar
Heir Presumptive
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Perth, Australia
Posts: 2,152
Charles 'hoped for Australian republic'

PRINCE Charles secretly confided he believed Australia should split from Britain and become a republic while touring there 32 years ago, a new book claims.
A new autobiography claims the heir to the throne told a 1977 dinner party in Sydney that he did not understand “why Australia bothered with us – we really are yesterday's news”.
The Sunday Express newspaper said entertainment mogul Harry M. Miller reveals in his autobiography details of the prince's gaffe and how Charles bedded several Australian women while on tour.

Charles 'hoped for Australian republic' | World Breaking News | News.com.au
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #218  
Old 11-30-2009, 04:00 AM
wbenson's Avatar
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: -, United States
Posts: 2,234
Visit to Australia, Autumn 2011

Queen Elizabeth II expected to attend the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in Perth in 2011 | Herald Sun

The Queen is expected to visit Perth to attend the 2011 Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting, which Australia won ahead of two other bidding countries.
__________________
TRF rules and FAQ
Reply With Quote
  #219  
Old 12-16-2009, 06:41 PM
Sonjapearl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: In front of my Mac, United States
Posts: 607
I've read somewhere that the reason Australians want to do away with the monarchy is because they want an Australian head of state, not a British one. The same probably goes for Canada.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #220  
Old 12-16-2009, 07:17 PM
Sereta's Avatar
Heir Presumptive
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: The, United States
Posts: 2,019
Yeah we have nothing against the monarchy itself we just want one of our own (an Australian) representing us.
Besides one of the articles made it clear that William isn't trying to sway the republic movement with this visit. Perhaps they just want him to get his feet wet with overseas visits and they decided that Wonderful Australia would be a good place to start.
__________________

__________________
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
australia, british commonwealth, elizabeth ii, governor general, julia gillard, monarchy versus republic, parliament, queen elizabeth ii


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The Queen and Canada, Residences, Governor General, etc... Duchess Queen Elizabeth II and the Duke of Edinburgh 398 08-15-2014 03:31 PM
General discussion about royal residences auroraDaniel British Royal Residences 87 08-09-2014 08:29 PM
Swedish Residences General Discussion Josefine Swedish Royal Residences 54 06-21-2014 10:12 AM
Official Visit from Australia to The Netherlands; September 26-27, 2006 fanletizia Dutch Royals 46 10-08-2006 01:22 AM




Additional Links
Popular Tags
birth bourbon-parma charlene chris o'neill crown prince frederik crown prince haakon crown princess letizia crown princess mary crown princess mette-marit crown princess victoria current events fashion grand duchess maria teresa grand duke henri hohenzollern infanta elena infanta sofia jordan kate middleton king abdullah ii king carl xvi gustav king felipe king felipe vi king harald king juan carlos king philippe king willem-alexander luxembourg olympic games ottoman picture of the month pieter van vollenhoven pom president hollande president komorowski prince albert prince albert ii prince carl philip prince constantijn prince felipe prince floris prince pieter-christiaan princess princess aimee princess alexia (2005 -) princess anita princess ariane princess beatrix princess catharina-amalia princess charlene princess claire princess laurentien princess letizia princess mabel princess madeleine princess margriet princess mary queen letizia queen mathilde queen maxima queen rania queen silvia queen sofia royal russia sofia hellqvist spain state visit wedding william



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:30 PM.

Social Knowledge Networks

eXTReMe Tracker
Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2014
Jelsoft Enterprises

Royal News Delivered to your Email!

You can get the latest Royal News right in your inbox.

unsusbcribe at anytime with one click

Close [X]