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  #101  
Old 07-26-2011, 08:12 PM
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Couldn't the monarch just refuse to give Royal Assent to legislation? That'd be like vetoing a bill in the US. That probably hasn't been done in a long time but it is an option.

In Australia, the Governor General sacked the government in the 1970s. He was Queen Elizabeth II's representative. She refused to get involved. A monarch technically could fire the government, I think, along the same lines.
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  #102  
Old 07-26-2011, 08:38 PM
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The last monarch to refuse the Royal Assent was Queen Anne. Since then it has been accepted that the monarch can't refuse to do so.
The Australian constitution actually gives more powers to the GG than the monarch has in Britain so the British monarch can't dismiss the PM or government.
The British monarch has no political power beyond appointing the PM and even that is decided by the public and the political parties.
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  #103  
Old 07-26-2011, 08:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nascarlucy View Post
...they could influence the House of Lords...
The House of Lords can only block legislation for a limited period of time and then it automatically goes through anyway.
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  #104  
Old 07-26-2011, 08:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Bundtrock View Post
...Let's say that the reigning Monarch of the day vehemently disagrees with some policy / position of the then British government.... What could the Monarch actually and in a practical sense do?
The best example for this would be the Belgian King who found himself in this exact situation - solution - he abdicated.
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  #105  
Old 07-27-2011, 06:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Iluvbertie View Post
The best example for this would be the Belgian King who found himself in this exact situation - solution - he abdicated.
He had himself declared non-ruling for a day so that he wouldn't have to sign some abortion legislation. King Baudoin.
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  #106  
Old 07-27-2011, 08:36 AM
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In my view the monarch could do nothing more than counsel against such action.

The British form of government is a democracy, and therefore the British people elect the majority of their legislature. If their elected representatives propose any policy or position which would not be in the interests of the people, it would be up to the people to call for or demand the removal of such representatives.. or to make their voice heard during an election.
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  #107  
Old 07-27-2011, 03:39 PM
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I want to THANK everyone that has replied thus far for taking their time to share their insights, I am very appreciative.

HM Queen Catherine, your reply leads me to another question please, since the British Monarch has no real political power, unlike say the British Prime Minister, but is the Head of State, is the British Monarch held accountable in anyway for political decisions made in their name, by the British people, directly or indirectly?

Thank you again, everyone! You are very kind to share your knowledge.
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  #108  
Old 07-27-2011, 05:24 PM
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Directly no - but some people do question her decisions indirectly e.g. some accuse her of selling out Britain by signing the Lisbon treaty (or signing the British legislation that allowed Britain to agree to the Lisbon treaty - I am not sure if the Head of States had to actually sign the treaty in person but it did involve some legislation).

She can't be held accountable when she has no choice but to abdicate or agree to the government of the day's decisions, publicly.
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  #109  
Old 07-27-2011, 09:12 PM
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I totally agree with what Iluvbertie says.

The British are well aware that the Queen is a figurehead of government, and has no political power even though Parliament acts "in her name". For the people to hold her accountable for what their elected officials do would be rather unfair.. as Iluvbertie says, she has no choice in matters of state.
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  #110  
Old 07-27-2011, 09:30 PM
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I remember when a group of people tried to attack Prince Charles and Camilla in their vehicle. Footage of the attack was shown on tv. I heard a couple of people yelling at them and blaming them for some legislation that had been passed. Whomever was yelling at them said they were the government as they were throwing things at the fleeing vehicle.

I agree with Iluvbertie said. Prince Charles had no say in the legislation and wouldn't have if he were King. To personally blame him and Camilla is very unfair.
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  #111  
Old 08-06-2011, 08:45 PM
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Absolute Monarchy + Constitutional Monarchy

Could an Absolute Monarchy work in today's modern age in Britain.
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  #112  
Old 08-07-2011, 06:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam20045 View Post
Could an Absolute Monarchy work in today's modern age in Britain.
No - the people fought too many wars to establish the system they have today to go back to the system pre 1215 when the first checks were put on the powers of the monarch.

100000s of Englishmen and women gave their lives over many centuries to bring about a say for the people in the government, of England, Britain, and countries like Australia which have virtually the same system.

Would an abolute monarchy work in Australia - no - yet we have the same basic system so why would you think that the British people would be anymore accepting of an autocrat than we would?

They didn't want one in 1215 and fought for a parliament from 1399 and even killed a king to get a parliamentary system of government.
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  #113  
Old 08-07-2011, 08:25 PM
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Who in their right mind would suggest dictatorship (which is what absolute monarchy is) as a favourable option for government? Did you not see the Arab Spring? People revolt against dictators no matter if they are called Presidents or Kings, and those that will survive in the long run will have to adapt to their peoples demands.
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  #114  
Old 08-08-2011, 03:22 AM
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The only absolute monarchs we have in Britain are people like Rupert Murdoch.
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  #115  
Old 08-08-2011, 08:57 PM
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People revolt against a lot of things - but today's paper's list far more Brits than just Murdoch as being way too wealthy (according to other Brits who are commenting).
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  #116  
Old 08-10-2011, 03:36 PM
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I think the Commons' reaction to the revelations said it all, for me.
It's less about physical wealth rather than a spectacular lack of basic integrity.
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  #117  
Old 08-12-2011, 04:37 AM
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Is the Queen the most controlled person in Britain?

On various boards I have seen criticism of the Queen for not making some comment about the riots and then elsewhere there was a comment about British monarchs in Europe and it got me thinking.

The Queen can't say what she thinks, publicly on any issue.
The Queen can't leave the country without the consent of the government.
The Queen has to go to work every day of the year - except for a couple of religious holidays.
The Queen has to visit people and countries she may not want to do.
The Queen has to have stay in her home people that she may not like, or respect.


When you look at a list like this - and I am sure it isn't complete - it seems that the Queen has the most restrictions on her basic freedoms than any other person in Britain - except those incarcerated of course - but they don't qualify for my comparison as that is a result of their own actions while the restrictions on her are because of her job and she had no choice about that job either.
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  #118  
Old 08-12-2011, 04:50 AM
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The only "perk" of the job is having Philip as a husband.

He would probably show her the funny or quirky side of things.
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  #119  
Old 08-12-2011, 05:00 AM
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Wow,reading that list showed me it's not easy being Queen!
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  #120  
Old 08-12-2011, 06:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Renata4711 View Post
The only "perk" of the job is having Philip as a husband.

He would probably show her the funny or quirky side of things.
I do agree Renata. I think the Prince has quite a humorous side to him. I think this has certainly helped "lighten the load" and assisted HM to carry out her duties in a most gracious manner. After all being a King or a Queen is a job with a a huge amount of responsibility attached. One is definitely tied down and controlled with regard to everything that you can and cannot do. Definitely takes a person with patience, understanding and high tolerance levels.
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