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  #61  
Old 02-07-2010, 04:11 AM
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Queen primed for hung parliament - Times Online

The civil service has quietly begun preparing for a hung parliament, codifying in a single document the role of the monarch in the event that no party wins an overall majority.

Officials want to ensure there is no risk that uncertainty could lead to a constitutional crisis over the Queen’s powers to accept or refuse a request to dissolve parliament.
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  #62  
Old 02-07-2010, 04:50 AM
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Looks like we might be in for an interesting time after the election.
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  #63  
Old 02-07-2010, 07:09 AM
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I'm sure the Queen will enjoy that, a hung parliament would put the country in an interesting situation.
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  #64  
Old 02-08-2010, 02:34 AM
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A Good one also? why Interesting exactly? Sorry just Curious
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  #65  
Old 02-08-2010, 05:21 AM
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Originally Posted by lumutqueen View Post
I'm sure the Queen will enjoy that, a hung parliament would put the country in an interesting situation.
IMO, the situation will be extremely tricky if there is a hung parliament. This is a time for a strong leader, to take the difficult decisions required to help the UK rebuild its economy. A huing parliament really is not an attractive prospect!
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  #66  
Old 02-08-2010, 05:59 AM
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A Good one also? why Interesting exactly? Sorry just Curious
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Originally Posted by muriel View Post
IMO, the situation will be extremely tricky if there is a hung parliament. This is a time for a strong leader, to take the difficult decisions required to help the UK rebuild its economy. A huing parliament really is not an attractive prospect!
I never said it was a good thing, I said it was an interesting thing.
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  #67  
Old 02-11-2010, 12:02 AM
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Ministers ‘should hold meetings with Queen every month’ | News

Government ministers or leading civil servants should be forced to outline any economic concerns to the Queen each month to prevent a repeat of the credit crunch, it was suggested today.

A panel convened by the British Academy believes that Whitehall departments will remain vigilant to another crisis if ministers have to account for themselves to the monarch.
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  #68  
Old 02-12-2010, 08:26 PM
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This makes sense to me.
Great Idea wait.....isnt that what The Privy Council Does??
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  #69  
Old 02-12-2010, 09:17 PM
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What a good idea. I thought one of rights as Head of State was to be consulted, so I am suprised this does not occur already. Maybe the UK could even move to be like Denmark where the Monarch and Heir sit in on Cabinet/Council of State meetings.
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  #70  
Old 02-13-2010, 10:27 PM
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The meetings of the Privy Council simply have the Queen saying 'Approved' when the name of an item on the agenda is read out. In the Danish Council of State of which the Queen and Crown Prince are members, there is a discussion about what certain bills are about, their provisions etc, what is good/bad about it and so on. Proposed bills have to be approved by the Queen-in-Council before they are presented to Parliament.
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  #71  
Old 02-13-2010, 10:42 PM
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If the bills have to be approved by the Queen first then she would cease to be above politics but is part of the political situation.
What happens if the Queen doesn't approve the bill?

In Britain the Queen is above politics and thus is briefed by the PM every week, sees minutes of cabinet meetings etc but she isn't there to hear the bickering or have a say in that decision making process.

Personally I prefer that to a Head of State who is actually involved as it gives the HoS an impartiality that otherwise isn't there.
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  #72  
Old 02-14-2010, 07:40 PM
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The Queen is not elected by the people and having her involved in the political process would be disastrous. Much better to have her consulted by her ministers and then sign the laws they enact for the people
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  #73  
Old 02-15-2010, 12:55 AM
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How a hung parliament would put the Queen centre stage | UK news | guardian.co.uk

Britain's most senior civil servants and royal courtiers, known as the "golden triangle", are preparing for a hung parliament, when the Queen would wield strong power over the formation of a government. Sir Gus O'Donnell, the cabinet secretary, is understood to have *distributed secret memos dating back to March 1974 to guide discussions.
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  #74  
Old 02-15-2010, 07:00 PM
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That would be interesting but is it really that likely?
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  #75  
Old 02-16-2010, 05:00 AM
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That would be interesting but is it really that likely?
It is certainly a possibility given the very fractured polity
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  #76  
Old 02-21-2010, 07:58 PM
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This BBC blog by Newsnight's political editor Michael Crick spells out how a hung parliament could come about, i.e. through the growing number of "unaligned MPs".

BBC - Newsnight: Michael Crick: Why a hung Parliament is a good bet

A hung parliament does not have to be a disaster - quite the opposite.

I live in Scotland where the Parliament is permanently "hung", i.e. no party has a majority, but the SNP (Scottish National Party) has been able to form a minority government, with "ad hoc" support from the Tories and the LibDems.
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  #77  
Old 03-14-2010, 04:08 PM
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Just found a document from the House of Commons Library SN/PC/04951 on "Hung Parliaments", citing six occasions when a Hung Parliament occurred, from 1910 to this day.

http://www.parliament.uk/commons/lib...snpc-04951.pdf

Another document (House of Commons Library), SN/PC/03861 is on the Royal Prerogative, setting out the powers of the Monarch as a Head of State, or acting on his/her own capacity...

http://www.parliament.uk/commons/lib...snpc-03861.pdf
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  #78  
Old 03-15-2010, 09:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Renata4711 View Post
Another document (House of Commons Library), SN/PC/03861 is on the Royal Prerogative, setting out the powers of the Monarch as a Head of State, or acting on his/her own capacity...
http://www.parliament.uk/commons/lib...snpc-03861.pdf
The main points from this document:

General prerogative powers

Because of the diverse subjects covered by royal prerogative and because of the uncertainty of the law in many instances where an ancient power has not been used in modern times, it is difficult to give a comprehensive catalogue of prerogative powers. However, the constitutional lawyers Bradley and Ewing summarise the main areas where the prerogative is used today as follows:

Powers relating to the legislature, e.g. - the summoning, proroguing and dissolution of parliament; the granting of royal assent to bills; legislating by Order in Council (e.g. in relation to civil service) or by letters patent; creating schemes for conferring benefits upon citizens where Parliament appropriates the necessary finance.

Powers relating to the judicial system, e.g. - various functions carried out through the Attorney General and the Lord Advocate; pardoning of convicted offenders or remitting or reducing sentences; granting special leave for appeal to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council.

Powers relating to foreign affairs, e.g. – the making of treaties, the declaration of war and the making of peace; restraining aliens from entering the UK and the issue of passports.

Powers relating to the armed forces e.g. – the Sovereign is commander in chief of the armed forces of the Crown and the control, organisation and disposition of the armed forces are within the prerogative.

Appointments and honours, e.g. – appointment of ministers, judges and many other holders of public office; creation of peers and conferring of honours and decorations.

Immunities and privileges, e.g. – the personal immunity of the Sovereign from being sued.

The prerogative in times of emergency, e.g. – requisitioning of ships (where compensation would be payable).

Miscellaneous prerogatives - various other historic powers relating to such things as royal charters, mining precious metals, coinage, franchises for markets, treasure trove, printing, guardianship of infants.

The Crown’s personal prerogative powers

There are three main prerogative powers recognised under the common law which still reside in the jurisdiction of the Crown.

• Firstly, the appointment of a Prime Minister; the sovereign must appoint that person who is in the best position to receive the support of the majority in the House of Commons. However, this does not involve the sovereign in making a personal assessment of leading politicians since no major party could fight a general election without a recognised leader.

However, if after an election no one party has an absolute majority in the House (as in 1923, 1929 and February 1974) then the Queen will send for the leader of the party with the largest number of seats (as in 1929 and 1974) or with the next largest number of seats (as in January 1924). Alternatively, the sovereign would have to initiate discussions with and between the parties to discover, for example, whether a government could be formed by a politician who was not a party leader or whether a coalition government could be formed.

• Secondly, the dissolution of Parliament, in the absence of a regular term for the life of Parliament fixed by statute, the Sovereign may by the prerogative dissolve Parliament and cause a general election to be held. The sovereign normally accepts the advice of the Prime Minister and grants dissolution when it is requested; a refusal would probably be treated by the Prime Minister as tantamount to a dismissal. These areas of the prerogative are the subject of continuing academic debate.

• Thirdly, the giving of royal assent to legislation, in 1708 Queen Anne was the last sovereign to refuse royal assent to a bill passed by Parliament. Additionally, no monarchs since the sixteenth century have signed Bills themselves and Queen Victoria was the last to give the Royal Assent in person in 1854.
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  #79  
Old 05-07-2010, 08:04 AM
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Some insight into the Queen's role in dealing with a hung parliament:

BBC News - The Queen and a hung Parliament


"The one thing that can be said with certainty amid all the uncertainty of a hung parliament is that Buckingham Palace is determined to maintain a distance from the political process and to keep the Queen well away from the discussions about who is in the strongest position to command the confidence of the Commons.

That is something for the politicians to sort out. It is not for the Queen to decide who should be prime minister and, after nearly 60 years on the throne and eleven different prime ministers - from Winston Churchill to Gordon Brown - she is keenly aware of the potential pitfalls for a hereditary monarchy of being drawn into refereeing the outcome of an inconclusive election. The Queen may be the font of authority, but it is not her role to determine who should receive her invitation to exercise that authority.

In the case of a hung parliament, the prime minister (who remains in office until such time as he tenders his resignation) is one of those vying for power.He is an obviously interested party, whose advice can no longer necessarily be considered as neutral. Consequently, this is one situation in which it is accepted that the monarch should take the advice of other knowledgeable figures.

Two Whitehall officials, the Cabinet Secretary Sir Gus O'Donnell, and the prime minister's principal private secretary Jeremy Heywood, will play important roles, liaising with the Queen's Private Secretary Christopher Geidt.

The Palace has also been consulting several leading academics who specialise in constitutional law. They have assisted the Palace in preparing for any eventuality, and they will be on hand over coming days to offer further advice if called upon. The fervent wish within Buckingham Palace will be that the political leaders can determine amongst themselves who is in the best position to command the support of the House of Commons."

Gawd bless yer, Ma'am – a hung parliament shows how crucial the Queen is – Telegraph Blogs

Next time someone says, “What’s the point of the monarchy?”, think about the mood in the country this morning. The only certainty is that we will have a hung parliament. It’s still not clear who will be Prime Minister. The bond markets and sterling are in a nervous panic. But, still, no one’s taking to the streets, and an underlying confidence remains that a Prime Minister will eventually be found.

The reason for the calm in the storm is the Queen, the ideal longstop in situations like this. Her insistence that she wouldn’t see any party leaders until this afternoon was exactly the right thing to do; bedding in the notion that it doesn’t matter too much if we don’t choose a Prime Minister immediately.

We may not have our next Prime Minister; we still have a leader.
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  #80  
Old 01-04-2011, 06:08 AM
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I wish more power..status was given to the Sovereign

I wish the Queen's Majesty was given more power and authority. I wish she had to rely less on the Cabinet and the Prime Minister of the day...and that she could make decisions of her own...for she is the Queen...the Monarch...the Sovereign...the sole of the Nation and of the Commonwealth...
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