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  #41  
Old 12-28-2007, 08:05 PM
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That's so cute...
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  #42  
Old 01-01-2010, 03:57 PM
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Here's a learned essay on the many ways of pronunciation by the peoples of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, and more....

Received pronunciation
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  #43  
Old 10-07-2010, 11:42 AM
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Originally Posted by BeatrixFan View Post
Well bear in mind that most people don't speak like that and even the Queen has reigned in the Windsor accent. For example, British people no longer say 'Orf' or 'One' instead of "I".
By the way, that's referred to as an "intrusive r". It's still present to a certain extent in the Boston accent, ie "Take a barth". Australians do it as well. But in the UK it's an RP thing.

When I listened to Edward VIII's abdication speech I noticed that his Rs were a little W-like, if that makes sense. It's called rhotacism and is a stereotype of RP pronunciation (think of the stereotype upper-crust Englishman who can't pronounce his r's). The Queen's RP seems to have evolved further from this.

RP used to be taught at speech and drama schools, and you couldn't get a job (for instance) in radio without being able to speak it. You didn't have to be upper class, but you did have to be able to put on the accent. Regional accents are now a lot more present on radio and television.
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  #45  
Old 11-30-2010, 03:45 PM
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Television certainly has a large influence. I have been dismayed thinking the English might pick up American accents. But in fact, I have noticed in recent years that some British words or phrases have entered American speech. For example, more Americans are now saying "in hospital" instead of "in the hospital", "at university", instead of "in college", and "went missing" instead of "is missing". It's interesting.
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  #46  
Old 12-01-2010, 02:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Elspeth View Post
Apparently the younger members of the royal family aren't the only ones whose English is beginning to sound like the rest of us; according to this article, the Queen's English has also become less "upper class" and more in line with the way the rest of the country speaks. Is nothing sacred?

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/global/ma...4/nqueen04.xml

I've seen reports that the younger royals and their close relations like Prince Edward, Diana Princess of Wales, and the Phillips children are/were using something between regular received pronunciation and Estuary English whereas the older royals still spoke with "cut glass" accents, but apparently the older ones are coming a bit downmarket too.

I wonder if this has to do with the media or whether it's because the members of the royal family meet more middle- and working-class people than they used to.

Frankly, I find this a travesty. HMQ, Diana, Princess of Wales and Prince Charles have enviable speech and articulation. PW and PH not so much. I hope they gain some gravitas with age and maturity.
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  #47  
Old 12-04-2010, 07:56 AM
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I'm from a part of Maritime Canada that's known for strong accents. According to my husband, every member of my immediate family speaks with a different accent. When I finished high school, we moved to a small community about 30 miles away. My brother, who's four years younger than I, picked up the accent of the junior and senior high schools that he attended. My sister spent considerable time in Toronto before moving back "home". My parents were from different communities that were within a couple of hours' drive from each other. The odd thing with me was that I began hearing my own accent once I moved to a different province.
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  #48  
Old 12-04-2010, 10:03 AM
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I retained the mid-west accent that my parents and grandparents had but with a twist. The mid-west accent is flat (some people are very flat), not a lot of inflection. If you aren't careful, you can sound monotone to others outside the mid-west. I had a little bit of Southern accent mixed in it but it's so slight that most people don't notice it.

While having my hair done, I met a woman who had been in the navy and was was a specialist in linguistics. She could tell where in the United States the person came from or if they had lived in other places in the United States. I started talking and was amazed that this woman from my speech patterns could tell regionally where I had lived. This woman even knew my family had lived around the Chicago area.
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  #49  
Old 12-04-2010, 11:56 AM
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So many parts of the U.S. have such different regional accents and I've always been interested in where my family's "Baltimore accent" came from. For example, "home" will sound like "hame".

Up thread, someone mentioned the queen pronouncing "home" in a similar way and I've always wondered if some of the "Baltimore accent" might have come from the U.K.

I'm so glad this thread has been resurrected! I didn't know it was here.
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  #50  
Old 12-04-2010, 12:25 PM
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There's a theory that North American English is pronounced more like the English of the early immigrants than today's British English is, because the USA and Canada had fewer influences on the language than the UK did in the last three hundred years or so. Presumably the same would be the case for the French who settled in North America at around the same time.


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Up thread, someone mentioned the queen pronouncing "home" in a similar way and I've always wondered if some of the "Baltimore accent" might have come from the U.K.
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  #51  
Old 12-04-2010, 09:36 PM
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I remember reading in an American history book that by the time the American Revolution came about, the speech patterns had changed so much that the American English sounded nothing like the Queen's English. Over time we developed our own speech patterns.
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  #52  
Old 12-05-2010, 12:49 PM
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Aldu, it depends on where you live and in which circles you are moving.

I think there is a huge shift happening in English, ranging from RP via Americanised English to a plethora of dialects.

Youth culture, supported by new media, is playing its part also.

I, an older lady, have caught myself saying "Cool !" to my son. Predictably, he laughed.
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  #53  
Old 12-05-2010, 12:52 PM
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It is said that the Midwesterners pronounce words with flat accents,which means that the words approximate the dictionary pronunciation. There is not a lot of inflection when it comes to Midwesterners. But we still have our dialects and accents -- just take a look at Chicago, which is a true melting pot.
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  #54  
Old 12-05-2010, 01:53 PM
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There's a book on amazon about the Queens English, only noticed it today.
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  #55  
Old 12-05-2010, 02:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Mermaid1962 View Post
There's a theory that North American English is pronounced more like the English of the early immigrants than today's British English is, because the USA and Canada had fewer influences on the language than the UK did in the last three hundred years or so. Presumably the same would be the case for the French who settled in North America at around the same time.
I've heard that too. The idea is certainly intriguing.
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  #56  
Old 12-05-2010, 02:18 PM
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Originally Posted by nascarlucy View Post
I remember reading in an American history book that by the time the American Revolution came about, the speech patterns had changed so much that the American English sounded nothing like the Queen's English. Over time we developed our own speech patterns.
I wish I could go back and compare accents!! I wonder how difficult it would be to understand early American accents.
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  #57  
Old 12-05-2010, 05:45 PM
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That would be fascinating if they could record a person's voice or people talking back then. I received a book on the American Revolution as a Christmas gift and quotes from people's diaries were included. A lot of Ye and thee and thou were used. The only time you see or hear these words are in the King James Version of the Bible. In the play the Scarlet Letter, these words are also used. This of course was influence from the Queen's English.
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  #58  
Old 12-05-2010, 11:47 PM
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Originally Posted by nascarlucy View Post
That would be fascinating if they could record a person's voice or people talking back then. I received a book on the American Revolution as a Christmas gift and quotes from people's diaries were included. A lot of Ye and thee and thou were used. The only time you see or hear these words are in the King James Version of the Bible. In the play the Scarlet Letter, these words are also used. This of course was influence from the Queen's English.
The funny thing is, the thee/thy/thou was actually the informal one, and you/your was what was used formally. Since thee/thy/thou is archaic now, most people probably think it would have been the opposite.
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  #59  
Old 12-23-2010, 02:05 PM
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The thee / thou etc. is still used in the Book of Common Prayer, by those Anglican churches which still use it. I used to work in a church where the congregation had a choice between the "modern version" and the BCP.
So, the thees and thous won't disappear for a while yet!
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  #60  
Old 12-27-2010, 02:13 PM
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Don't forget the Amish. They still speak the/thy/thou. As for me, I've been exposed to so many dialects and versions of English that most people think I've been to Speach Neutral School. I disagree, but I only hear me cranially(sp?).
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