The Royal Forums Coat of Arms


Join The Royal Forums Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
  #21  
Old 12-07-2006, 01:14 PM
BeatrixFan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: London, United Kingdom
Posts: 6,843
RP is still heard just as Birmingham accents are still around. The only differewnce is that the media isn't fronted by only RP accents.
__________________

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 12-07-2006, 01:35 PM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: mar del plata, Argentina
Posts: 9
ok, thank you beatrixfan!
__________________

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 12-07-2006, 06:59 PM
lilytornado's Avatar
Courtier
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: -, United States
Posts: 504
Sorry, this might be a stupid question, but what is RP?
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 12-07-2006, 07:03 PM
BeatrixFan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: London, United Kingdom
Posts: 6,843
RP is "Recieved Pronunciation" and is the more technical name for the "Queen's English".
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 12-07-2006, 08:21 PM
Elise27's Avatar
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: , United States
Posts: 153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Madame Royale
Like in the Rolf Harris documentary (painting commissioned for her 80th) where asked if seeing herself age bothered her, she replied...'Naaahhh'.
that was rather shocking wasn't it but I quite enjoyed it, i dont think i would have ever imagined the queen saying 'naaahh". I wish there were a video on the net of that. I do wonder what else the queen says that we would never expect her to say.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 12-13-2006, 04:12 AM
Queen Marie's Avatar
Commoner
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: West Midlands, United Kingdom
Posts: 30
The simple fact is that the English language is a constantly evolving one.
This process is only speeding up, owing to television and globalisation, hence Her Majesty's seemingly quick descent into a "lower" form of English.
If we were to jump forward in time, just a few hundred years, we would have enormous trouble keeping up with a conversation in our own language!
In some ways it's a sad thing, as the Queen's English really is a lost art, but it's also interesting to study how English has changed over the centuries.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 09-09-2007, 03:02 PM
CasiraghiTrio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Burbank, United States
Posts: 6,402
I don't know.... I still hear the same vowel pronunciations in her latest commonwealth speech. The same clipped, clenched speech of always for HM, at least I can't hear any difference.
I remember reading in Brian Hoey's book on Charles (the first one, at 30 or something) that Charles has mostly his father's voice and accent (obviously, of course) but his vowel sounds are his mother's. With Prince William, I used to hear the same Philip-Charles voice, only now William's is highly altered. Maybe his university years, stepping from the Etonian class to the upper middle class, is what did it.
__________________
Chewsteraghi on Tumblr. Schmichaelira on Twitter. Tumblr aka obsessivechewsteraghidisorder. Be warned: I'm weird.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 09-15-2007, 10:08 PM
Al_bina's Avatar
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: City, Kazakhstan
Posts: 5,805
Oh!!!! My God!!!

The articles submitted by the members have broken my heart. Oh! My God! This isn’t happening!!!!
I admit that the language is an alive and ever-evolving structure, which is deeply affected by the environment at large (society, the sprit of times, and other developments). However, it is sad that URP tends to undergo rather unpleasant changes. I am trying so hard to acquire this veneer named the URP….
__________________
"I never did mind about the little things"
Amanda, "Point of No Return"
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 09-16-2007, 04:18 PM
Onassis Line's Avatar
Commoner
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Loches, France
Posts: 27
The funniest thing is the image of Princes Harry and William teaching the Queen Mother to do the Ali G finger click and say "Booyakasha" or what ever the saying was. I remember watching them confess to doing so


Estuary English is a pet hate of mine, as is deep regional accents on television presenters these days. I mourn the days of crisp clear speech on the television and love the likes of Stephen Fry all the more, for his precise manner of speaking.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 09-24-2007, 01:13 AM
Vanishing Lady's Avatar
Gentry
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Winter Haven, United States
Posts: 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elspeth View Post
I remember that twenty-first birthday broadcast from South Africa, where "my whole life" sounded quite a bit like "may hale lafe." When she did that voice-over for the documentary about her life a few years ago, I remember being struck by how deep her voice was compared to the early broadcasts, where it was almost painfully high-pitched.
That happens because of the recording medium and how it changes over the years. If you have a tape of your voice from some years back, play it and listen to yourself -- your voice might sound a little higher.

Also, when you hear yourself talk, you are listening from the inside of your own head by convection (sound bouncing off the bones in your skull), so your perception of how you sound may be different from how you actually sound. It's always such a jolt to hear yourself recorded because recording isn't done by convection.

Another thing is the vocal cords do tend to stretch with age and use, making the voice seem lower as we get older -- this isn't true with everyone, but it does happen. Also, when she is more relaxed, her voice may be lower. I have a low voice myself, but when I need to speak up or into a microphone, it does go up in pitch a bit. The mechanics are fascinating -- I could be here all night.

On the topic of the relaxation of the Queen's English, it's partially due to evolution of the language itself, and partially due to societal relaxation and more of an attempt at egalitarianism...well, in public, anyway...
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 09-24-2007, 03:34 PM
selrahc4's Avatar
Courtier
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: , United States
Posts: 760
Even back in the day (1950's) when the Queen was being criticised for her high-pitched voice when delivering speeches, there were many who mentioned that her normal speaking voice in private was normally lower. So, it makes sense that it was from nervousness, at least partially,.
__________________
aka Janet on some other forums
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 11-08-2007, 12:16 PM
Lady Bluffton's Avatar
Nobility
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Bluffton, United States
Posts: 348
I would say don't underestimate the power of television to modify a person's accent or even dialect. Linguists throughout the world are scrambling to find "untainted" subjects who have never travelled more than a few hours from their home and who don't watch television. In the United States, that's a very rare person, indeed. I would imagine the same in England and other developed nations.

Dare say that the Queen does not fall into that category, and can be expected to have an evolving accent / pronunciation...just like the rest of us!
__________________
"You can dance, you can jive, having the time of your life / See that girl, watch that scene, diggin' the dancing queen"
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 11-21-2007, 03:13 PM
Picmajik's Avatar
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Atlanta, United States
Posts: 161
Smile constantly changing here

I can tell a difference just traveling across my home state with regional dialects. Back in the 70's when President Carter was elected there were many books and magazine articles "analyzing" his accent and how we had at least 9 distinct dialects in our state and on and on. It's just that some in the media were making fun of the fact that if you do not speak as they do the assumption is that you are less educated and we know more, etc. If you do not have their trained "neutral" broadcast voice then you must be a hick, redneck or other country bumpkin. One thing they did get right in some of these articles is that the influence of radio, then TV and our more mobile society has made a difference in homogenizing our accents more. The best example they gave is how Carter's generation would pronounce his last name as "cot-tuh", dropping both r's. My generation would say "car-tuh", just dropping the last r.

I made a point of videotaping my great aunt before she passed on just so I could have copies of some of her stories with her great regional accent and laugh. I was born in Louisiana while my father was in college and when I first moved back to Georgia full time when I was 7 I could barely understand half my relatives. It took a while but soon I sounded more like them but still a mix of both parents. I love being able to pick up on some regional accents now and more often than not I can tell what part of the US someone is from but I'm nowhere near Henry Higgins. It is possible to find some "untainted" accents in rural areas but most of them are older and it is harder to find. I would love to sit down and videotape relatives with family stories just to preserve accents and stories. I love colloquialisms also--where did this phrase come from and whatever does it mean?

As for the "cut glass" accent I can sit and listen to it all day. My mom gets frustrated though as she can't understand it at all if I'm watching any British tv show. I found a book once that I wish I'd bought now explaining the different between U and non-U vocabulary and accents, similar to URP but Americanized.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 12-23-2007, 06:05 PM
BeatrixFan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: London, United Kingdom
Posts: 6,843
Well bear in mind that most people don't speak like that and even the Queen has reigned in the Windsor accent. For example, British people no longer say 'Orf' or 'One' instead of "I".
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 12-23-2007, 07:05 PM
Skydragon's Avatar
Imperial Majesty
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: London and Highlands, United Kingdom
Posts: 10,943
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeatrixFan View Post
For example, British people no longer say 'Orf' or 'One' instead of "I".
Errrrr!
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 12-23-2007, 07:16 PM
BeatrixFan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: London, United Kingdom
Posts: 6,843
Oh you don't? I thought you lot had gone out with the teasmaid.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 12-23-2007, 08:38 PM
CasiraghiTrio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Burbank, United States
Posts: 6,402
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeatrixFan View Post
Well bear in mind that most people don't speak like that and even the Queen has reigned in the Windsor accent. For example, British people no longer say 'Orf' or 'One' instead of "I".
It is interesting to me that you say "no longer". So the difference of the Queen's speech is not so much a difference of socio-economic class, but actually is generational?
__________________
Chewsteraghi on Tumblr. Schmichaelira on Twitter. Tumblr aka obsessivechewsteraghidisorder. Be warned: I'm weird.
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 12-23-2007, 08:41 PM
BeatrixFan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: London, United Kingdom
Posts: 6,843
I'd say so actually. I think it shows with William and Harry who say "Longing" and not "Lornging" etc. I think it's a matter of age.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 12-27-2007, 10:53 PM
trinny's Avatar
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: On the coast, Australia
Posts: 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Onassis Line View Post
The funniest thing is the image of Princes Harry and William teaching the Queen Mother to do the Ali G finger click and say "Booyakasha" or what ever the saying was. I remember watching them confess to doing so
Oh that was funny!!

This is my memory of it but I could have got it a bit wrong:

It was in a TV show about the late Queen Mother: the members of the family talking about their memories of her ...the boys were saying what a cool Great Grandmother she was, they had been telling her about Ali G and how fantastic they thought he was and they taught her how to do the finger click (as you've said) and to say "Respect!" ...

they all went into luncheon and at the end of the meal she leaned back in her chair, said to her butler (I guess) "Ahhh So-and-So that was very nice ... *does finger click* RESPECT!"

The whole room fell apart laughing!



SORRY TO GO OFF TOPIC, by the way!
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 12-28-2007, 09:42 AM
WindsorIII's Avatar
Nobility
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Tucson, United States
Posts: 406
Very funny! I would have loved to have seen that
__________________

__________________
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
accents and dialects, british royal family, class system, elizabeth ii, queen elizabeth ii, queen's english


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Germanic Ancestry of the House of Windsor BeatrixFan British Royals 104 10-23-2014 07:26 PM
Queen Mary, consort of George V (1867-1953) gaoshan1021 British Royal History 279 10-15-2014 01:09 AM
British Royal Family Genealogy Claire Royal Genealogy 384 10-06-2014 07:27 PM
English/British Queens and Queen Consorts mknyazev British Royal History 46 02-18-2013 03:48 PM




Popular Tags
abdication belgium birth carl philip charlene chris o'neill crown prince frederik crown prince haakon crown princess mary crown princess mette-marit crown princess victoria current events engagement fashion genealogy grand duchess maria teresa grand duke henri hohenzollern infanta leonor infanta sofia jewellery jordan king abdullah ii king carl xvi gustav king felipe king felipe vi king harald king juan carlos king philippe king willem-alexander luxembourg nobility olympics ottoman poland president hollande prince albert prince albert ii prince carl philip prince constantijn prince floris prince maurits prince pieter-christiaan princess aimee princess anita princess beatrix princess charlene princess claire princess laurentien princess mabel princess margriet princess mary princess mary fashion queen letizia queen mathilde queen maxima queen rania queen silvia queen sofia royal royal fashion russia sofia hellqvist spain state visit sweden the hague visit wedding winter olympics 2014



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:17 AM.

Social Knowledge Networks

eXTReMe Tracker
Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2014
Jelsoft Enterprises

Royal News Delivered to your Email!

You can get the latest Royal News right in your inbox.

unsusbcribe at anytime with one click

Close [X]