The Royal Forums Coat of Arms

Go Back   The Royal Forums > Reigning Houses > Royal House of Jordan > King Abdullah and Queen Rania and Family

Join The Royal Forums Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
  #61  
Old 02-20-2005, 07:50 PM
Balqis's Avatar
Nobility
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by maryshawn
I read it as QR was trying to say she and KA work very, very hard--12-14 hour days are the norm, not the exception. So, despite pretty photos of lovely occasions, it's kind of like the late Diana saying "80% is sheer slog; 20% is fantastic" and QN saying "you wouldn't wish this job on your worst enemy unless you felt they were the right person to handle it." That was, I felt, her kudos to KA/QR as she went onto say they were the right choice--the only choice in her opinion--to handle it. But that was her opinion. Hassan seemed equally well-equipped. I have a gorgeous photo of he and his family but is 2 pages and won't fit onto scanner properly.....still, will try to post. When I read about the precarious helicopter ride, I know I would've been sick to my stomach and likely called it off or postponed. And then taking red-eye flights while still not missing a beat in her hectic schedule.....well, that doesn't seem like a fantasy....I think she is quite aware of the image Queens and royals are shown wearing gorgeous clothing but the reality is a lot of time and energy goes to fulfilling commitments, preparing for appearances and substantive speeches like the ones Balqis posted....She seems to be trying to approach it all in a practical manner while subtly addressing it is all far more than elegant attire. This is sooooo poorly phrased; does it make any sense?
It makes alot of sense! I think what I have seen here at the ME forum is that most people see the superficial side, the fairytale if you wish. This is both good and bad, Good in that it (the fairytale) brings Jordan to the world's attention but bad because if all they see is a beautiful queen dressed in elegant clothes, it can give an impression that that's all there is. When I started to become interested in Queen Rania, my interest made me dig deeper. That's the type of person I am. It wasn't hard to see that each event the Queen attends has a more meaningful side to it. I guess that's what should be more prominent, the actual event not what Queen Rania is wearing. But the blame shouldn't rest on the Queen alone (should she recycle more, should she wear less designer clothes that catch our eye every time), it is in us. We enjoy the clothes and the fairytale I think a little too much and some of us even begin to resent Rania for it and look for reasons to criticize and attack her. From all I have seen she isn't a bad person, she certainly isn't superficial or lazy (her involvement in serious issues and her eloquence shows that), she is actually very inspiring and caring.
__________________

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #62  
Old 02-20-2005, 07:53 PM
Balqis's Avatar
Nobility
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 319
Excellent Speech!

“Human Dignity and Humanitarian Space”

Remarks by Her Majesty Queen Rania Al-Abdullah, Launch of Women and War Exhibit, 28th International Conference of the Red Cross and Red Crescent, Geneva, 4 December 2003


I’m deeply honored to be a part of the 28th International Conference of the Red Cross and the Red Crescent. In wars and famines, outbreaks and earthquakes, the Red Cross and Red Crescent are always there… putting lives on the line for others, replacing horror with hope.

It is noble work. It is dangerous work. And now, more than ever, it is necessary work, in a world crying out for compassion.

Nearly half a century ago, the photographer Edward Steichen composed an exhibition called “The Family of Man.” Its 503 photos from 68 countries captured the sweetness and struggles of life… reminding a world still scarred by war that we are sisters and brothers at heart. We all feel passion. We all feel pain. We all strive and hope and dream. As Steichen said, “Photography records the gamut of feelings written on the human face… the beauty of the earth and skies that man has inherited… and the wealth and confusion man has created. [Photography] is a major force in explaining man to man.”

The photographs you will see today will evoke more questions than explanations.

Why, in an age of progress, do we see so much brutality?

Why, in a world of plenty, do so many people still suffer such deprivation?
And how are we to comprehend the strength of the human spirit? For in the faces of the women in these photos, and the words alongside their images, we witness their struggles, their sorrow, but also their will to carry on. From female amputees in Angola, awaiting medical care, to Bosnian women, praying at a memorial for missing relatives, they seem to be saying, “We will not give up…so don’t give up on us.”

These women have found loyal champions in the Red Cross and Red Crescent, who understand that women’s well-being is more than just a marginal concern. An unsettled woman means shrinking levels of health and education for her family. And troubled families mean a troubled future for social and economic development. But by the same token, if we can uphold the safety and rights of women – if we can protect their human dignity, even in times of upheaval – we can lift the horizons for humanity as a whole.

The goal of protecting human dignity is what brought us here to Geneva today. Every day, in every country, we witness violations of this right.

Those who perpetrate such abuses are never at a loss for “why.” Security, order, even workplace efficiency are offered as explanations.

But a company’s rise in profit margin does not justify lesser treatment of its workers. A government’s obligation to preserve security does not override people’s right to self-respect. Men, women and children should never have to trade in their dignity for survival – to abandon their homes… suffer persecution … or endure any kind of abuse.

Let’s make no mistake about it: The right to human dignity is non-negotiable.

International law is a powerful tool to confront and address these problems. But we don’t have to be legal scholars to understand what feels right. The world’s great faiths and philosophies all draw strength from the same core belief: Dignity is intrinsic to humankind. It’s a universal birthright.

Human dignity matters deeply to us as individuals who seek self-improvement. It matters to us as parents who want the very best for the children we love. And it has to matter to us as citizens of a globalizing world. In an age when borders no longer define the limits of culture and commerce, neither can they contain the enormous costs of human suffering.

Today, we find our global moral conscience lagging behind our global markets. The sophisticated international networks that have been employed to facilitate and enhance our everyday lives should also serve as the delivery system of a universal code of human values and ethics.

Human dignity should never be viewed as an expensive commodity, one that is least attainable in our hierarchy of needs. None of us can truly get ahead if most of us are left behind. Closing this “moral lag” will require a common conviction that access to human dignity and respect is just as important as access to medicine, education and technology.

And access to all is what the Red Cross and Red Crescent are about. Your efforts are guided by the fundamental impulse of human empathy. Neutrality and impartiality are the currency of your realm. You are defenders of human dignity, wherever it’s at risk.

But you cannot protect others if you are vulnerable yourselves. And in recent years, we’ve seen an alarming erosion of humanitarian space. Encroachments on your neutrality have made it harder to do your jobs. Violence against aid workers, such as the bombing of the Red Cross offices in Baghdad, has shocked and saddened the civilized world.

If we do not address these problems, we will pay the price. We have to safeguard humanitarian space – in both physical and moral terms.

And more than that, we have to make room for humanitarian space in our hearts – and awaken the part of ourselves that aches at the sight of another in pain. We cannot afford to ration compassion… reject the unfamiliar… or save our sympathy only for people who look or sound like us.

I believe this exhibit is an excellent place to begin. For here, we will gaze not at strangers but at mothers and sisters and daughters we know. Perhaps it’s the way she smiles, or frowns. Perhaps it’s her quiet resilience. Perhaps it’s the way she holds her baby tenderly to her chest.

It’s been said “The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera.” Let us offer the women in these photos our promise:

We see you. And we care.

Thank you very much
__________________

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #63  
Old 02-20-2005, 08:03 PM
marezdote's Avatar
Royal Highness
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Baltimore, United States
Posts: 1,528
What a great speech! Thanks for posting Balqis.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #64  
Old 02-20-2005, 08:45 PM
maryshawn's Avatar
Serene Highness
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Green Bay, United States
Posts: 1,214
Another excellent post, Balqis! Enjoyed QR's speech very much.....

OK, I was not initially enamored by Rania because of whole succession thing and I got drawn into rumors about it but even my favorite, QN, said you have to dress a certain way to draw interest to your country--even if she, for instance, went into her marriage with blue jeans, 2 skirts and a plain dress. She quickly had it made clear to her by palace officials and other JRF this would not suffice...so she turned to designers used by her mother in law and predecessor, Alia. It irritated her that the focus was often on her appearance rather than the substance of her speeches though. Diana, during her marriage, found herself in same position--wearing haute couture--although, in her case, she was pressured to wear UK designer clothes to draw attention to them and promote that side of the British economy. So it's kind of a lose-lose situation if one wants to be royal yet would prefer simplicity over style. There is a ME designer QR uses (name escapes me) and I just read an article emphasizing jordanian designers are on the rise....hopefully, we will see QR wearing more of their work but she could get criticized for that as the dresses are drop-dead gorgeous but elaborate in their beading and design.

Then--probably because of her fashions--I started seeing more articles on QR and Jordan. And I read them and became more interested. Now, does that hurt the country or her causes? I don't think so. If her appearance opens doors or causes writers to feature her, it enhances peoples' interest in Jordan.

It really struck a chord with me when one of QN's friends said (Vanity Fair, 1999) by being queen "she gave up the right to even have a bad hair day." I would hate it if everytime I left my home, everything I wore, did or said was examined. I'm not saying QR doesn't like fashion ("I understand the value of retail therapy" ("O" magazine)). But to go out looking "normal" like the rest of us would be perceived as disrespectful in some circles.

She married a prince who was never destined, it seemed, to be King. So it's not like she planned all of this and I just am trying to give her the benefit of the doubt as she learns an entirely unexpected role. Her speeches are interesting and substantive; she does not cancel appointments or commitments; she shows respect on state visits to all she meets;.....I don't honestly know what more the lady can do.

I commented in one post QN was reinventing herself now and was reminded so was KA, Hassan and others. I think it's safe to say QR is in that category. It bothers me when people say they want to know about her work, then when directed to information, respond "don't go there." Either you have an interest or you don't. If you like another royal better, wouldn't it be more productive to focus on letting us all know of their good works?
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #65  
Old 02-20-2005, 10:05 PM
maryshawn's Avatar
Serene Highness
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Green Bay, United States
Posts: 1,214
QR in Vogue and Hello



With children, working and presiding over meeting (looks like me during some meetings--bored!) and posing for official portraits.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	qrnew2.jpg
Views:	700
Size:	9.8 KB
ID:	96333   Click image for larger version

Name:	qrnew3.jpg
Views:	681
Size:	15.3 KB
ID:	96334   Click image for larger version

Name:	qrnew4.jpg
Views:	698
Size:	11.6 KB
ID:	96335   Click image for larger version

Name:	qrnew6.jpg
Views:	648
Size:	6.9 KB
ID:	96336  

Click image for larger version

Name:	qrnew7.jpg
Views:	635
Size:	5.5 KB
ID:	96337   Click image for larger version

Name:	qrnew9.jpg
Views:	662
Size:	6.5 KB
ID:	96338   Click image for larger version

Name:	qrnew13.jpg
Views:	737
Size:	9.5 KB
ID:	96339  
Attached Images
 
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #66  
Old 02-21-2005, 08:34 PM
Balqis's Avatar
Nobility
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 319
To Mary Shawn

Thanks very much for posting those pics, Mary Shawn. She does look bored in one of the pics, but at the same time looking intently too LOL. Strange combination
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #67  
Old 02-21-2005, 08:44 PM
Balqis's Avatar
Nobility
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by maryshawn
Another excellent post, Balqis! Enjoyed QR's speech very much.....

OK, I was not initially enamored by Rania because of whole succession thing and I got drawn into rumors about it but even my favorite, QN, said you have to dress a certain way to draw interest to your country--even if she, for instance, went into her marriage with blue jeans, 2 skirts and a plain dress. She quickly had it made clear to her by palace officials and other JRF this would not suffice...so she turned to designers used by her mother in law and predecessor, Alia. It irritated her that the focus was often on her appearance rather than the substance of her speeches though. Diana, during her marriage, found herself in same position--wearing haute couture--although, in her case, she was pressured to wear UK designer clothes to draw attention to them and promote that side of the British economy. So it's kind of a lose-lose situation if one wants to be royal yet would prefer simplicity over style. There is a ME designer QR uses (name escapes me) and I just read an article emphasizing jordanian designers are on the rise....hopefully, we will see QR wearing more of their work but she could get criticized for that as the dresses are drop-dead gorgeous but elaborate in their beading and design.

Then--probably because of her fashions--I started seeing more articles on QR and Jordan. And I read them and became more interested. Now, does that hurt the country or her causes? I don't think so. If her appearance opens doors or causes writers to feature her, it enhances peoples' interest in Jordan.

It really struck a chord with me when one of QN's friends said (Vanity Fair, 1999) by being queen "she gave up the right to even have a bad hair day." I would hate it if everytime I left my home, everything I wore, did or said was examined. I'm not saying QR doesn't like fashion ("I understand the value of retail therapy" ("O" magazine)). But to go out looking "normal" like the rest of us would be perceived as disrespectful in some circles.

She married a prince who was never destined, it seemed, to be King. So it's not like she planned all of this and I just am trying to give her the benefit of the doubt as she learns an entirely unexpected role. Her speeches are interesting and substantive; she does not cancel appointments or commitments; she shows respect on state visits to all she meets;.....I don't honestly know what more the lady can do.

I commented in one post QN was reinventing herself now and was reminded so was KA, Hassan and others. I think it's safe to say QR is in that category. It bothers me when people say they want to know about her work, then when directed to information, respond "don't go there." Either you have an interest or you don't. If you like another royal better, wouldn't it be more productive to focus on letting us all know of their good works?
The reinvention is almost compulsory for royal ladies. Almost all go through with one. Looking at early pics of Princess Mary of Denmark and now, there is definitely a big change. Queen Rania has undegone the same kind of change and over the years it has been more noticeable. The look becomes polished and refined. The reason for it becomes understandable when you realize that people are watching you, taking note of every detail and yes critizising you. So I think the royal ladies try very hard to look their best as possible.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #68  
Old 02-21-2005, 08:47 PM
Balqis's Avatar
Nobility
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 319
Psychology Today article & interview

Queen Rania Al-Abdullah of Jordan does not allow an assistant to answer her door. She opens it herself and, looking stunning in a stylish leather skirt and stilettos, greets her guests with a friendly smile. Amazed by her casual manner, I follow her into the sitting room of her hotel suite in New York City. She is here to attend, among several other noteworthy functions, the World Economic Forum, and we chat until she delivers a second shock.

"Has anyone ever told you that you look like Gwyneth Paltrow?" I'm completely taken aback. But this reaction is exactly wrong. That's not because I look anything like the actress. Hardly. Instead, it's because I suddenly realize that the queen of Jordan might know more about U.S. culture and that of most countries than do I and many other Americans.

Rania's Reign

The world's youngest—and arguably most beautiful—queen at only 31 years old, Queen Rania is garnering increasing international acclaim for her modern approach to presiding over a traditional Arab nation. Most apparent upon first glance, she does not wear the veil that many might expect to see covering the face of a Muslim woman; she is quick to point out that this does not diminish the strength of her faith in Islam.

"Many women in Jordan dress the way I do," she explains. "We, as a country, give women the right to choose whether they want to wear the veil or not. From the Western perspective, I think a lot of people believe the veil symbolizes backwardness. In reality, that's not the case." This contemporary mind-set, which extends far beyond the absence of her veil, may stem from her more common upbringing.

Formerly Rania Al-Yasin, she was born in Kuwait to a Jordanian family of Palestinian origin who certainly did not anticipate her royal future. In fact, she had already earned her bachelor's degree in business administration at the American University in Cairo and, fluent in Arabic and English, had begun a career at Citibank when she was introduced to Abdullah Bin Al-Hussein, the son of Jordan's King Hussein, at a party. Less than six months later, in June of 1993, the two married. But because Prince Abdullah was not crown prince, neither he nor his new wife anticipated inheriting the throne.

"I was lucky, because when I came into the family, I had the opportunity to get used to a new way of life," Queen Rania now says. "My husband was just a prince, and I was just a princess, so I could control, to some extent, the separation of my public duties from my private life." A year after their wedding the couple had a son, whom they named Hussein, after his grandfather, and two years later Princess Iman was born. Then, in 1999, Jordan suffered a tragedy that significantly changed the young family's way of life.

King Hussein, adored by Jordanians for his commitment to establishing peace in the Middle East, was dying of cancer. For 33 years, his younger brother Prince Hassan bin Tallal had been the crown prince. But just days before his death, King Hussein changed the dynastic succession by naming Abdullah, then only 37, his heir. After his death, Abdullah and Rania, now king and queen, were left to grapple with their grief and the unexpected and daunting task of ruling a country.

For her part, and despite a lack of "job training," the new queen continued tackling the national concerns she had focused on during her first six years of marriage. In 1998, for instance, she had launched the Child Abuse Prevention Project. Prior to this, child abuse was underreported in Jordan and discussing it was taboo. This endeavor led her to open Dar Al Aman, or Home of Safety, in 2000. The first abused-children's home in the Arab world, Dar Al Aman offers specialized psychological and physical rehabilitation.



The Children

Last year, the queen's love for children caught the attention of Jacques-François Martin, president of The Vaccine Fund, who asked her to join the organization's international board of directors. Founded in 2000 with the help of a $750 million donation from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Fund works to stop the three million deaths from vaccine-preventable diseases that occur each year among poor infants.

Naturally, the queen accepted Martin's offer, and the night after first meeting her I attend a Vaccine Fund benefit dinner at New York's Four Seasons Hotel. The queen, Martin, Bill Gates and several other well-to-dos preside over the glittery event. As I have come to expect, the queen looks savvy and sophisticated, and her spike heels prompt one guest to lean in for comment. "How does she wear those?" she whispers, shaking her head in awe.

Martin speaks admiringly of Queen Rania as he delivers a few words of thanks to the dinner crowd and again later, when asked to describe her work with children. "I believe that her commitment to children is a very real and tangible part of her daily life," he says. "On the occasions I have been with her, she has always mentioned how, as a mother, she finds it heartbreaking that so many children die each year of vaccine-preventable diseases. It is obviously something she believes in deeply."

Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, there in brief attendance, stops to embrace Queen Rania before departing. The two first ladies, who appear genuinely pleased to see each other, have worked together with the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) on securing loans for small businesses.

"The queen is a former banker, so she understands the criteria you need to be a successful borrower," says USAID Administrator Andrew Natsios, who discussed microfinancing with her majesty at a recent conference in Washington, D.C. "But she clearly also understands the problems of the poor. The only way you get out of poverty is to create jobs, businesses and enterprise; and microfinance does that. She's been an articulate worldwide spokeswoman."

This initiative has assisted the Jordan River Foundation (JRF), a nonprofit organization the queen founded in 1995, in significantly improving the quality of life for Jordanian women.

"The challenges that women face in the Arab Muslim world are similar to challenges that women face in developing worlds," Queen Rania explains. By presenting loans to Jordan's small-business entrepreneurs, JRF is empowering women to become skilled contributors to society and income providers to their families. "Women are beginning to educate themselves on their rights. Once they know what their rights are, they can be more proactive in demanding that these rights are met," she says.



Her Causes

Truly, the list of organizations that Queen Rania supports is endless. And while some might suggest that her royal role is a symbolic one when compared with her husband's executive role, others would argue that her dedication to humanitarian causes make the two equally important to their nation of five million.

Her inherent knack for connecting with commoners has enticed the media to draw parallels between her majesty and Princess Diana, a compliment Queen Rania hesitates to accept. "It's an honor, because she was very special," she admits when prodded. "However, when you're in a public role, people tend to compare you with someone else."

All flattery aside, Queen Rania believes that her most important role is that of a mother to her three children, the youngest of whom, Princess Salma, is less than one year old. Given the current political climate surrounding Arab nations, however, the queen and her husband are being asked more and more to play a peacekeeping role, which may make balancing the family's work and private life.

"If you're conscious of it and make sure that you have time on your own, you can pull it off," she says. "I think from the outside, people don't expect mine to be a normal life. But when you get to know it, it actually is."

May/June 2003
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #69  
Old 02-22-2005, 12:31 AM
maryshawn's Avatar
Serene Highness
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Green Bay, United States
Posts: 1,214
Well, if you are working 12 hour days and meet constantly (been there, done that), I suppose we can understand if one looks actually now that I study actual photo in entirety, a bit tired but trying to maintain focus on those speaking to her.....That's my thought now that I look more closely!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Balqis
Thanks very much for posting those pics, Mary Shawn. She does look bored in one of the pics, but at the same time looking intently too LOL. Strange combination
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #70  
Old 02-22-2005, 12:38 AM
marezdote's Avatar
Royal Highness
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Baltimore, United States
Posts: 1,528
When was she in Vogue?
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #71  
Old 02-22-2005, 11:18 AM
Veram98's Avatar
Courtier
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: at different places, Germany
Posts: 676
Time Magazine: Regarding Rania

Blazing a trail for Arab women, Jordan's stylish Queen has redefined her role to become an agent of political change. But in the face of traditionalist opposition, she can push women's issues only so far
By SCOTT MACLEOD | AMMAN
February 15, 2004

Stepping out of her gunmetal-gray SUV and striding into the compound of Amman's Kamalia School for Girls, Rania al Abdullah doesn't fit the prim, circumspect image of an Arab Queen. For one thing, she's wearing a snug-fitting metallic gold top, matching pants and two-inch heels, and her mane of glossy brown hair brushes across her shoulders as she walks. For another, rather than standing around exchanging pleasantries, she's walking briskly to her appointment like a busy CEO heading for a board meeting. Nor could she seem more unlike the audience that awaits her inside the school: 28 teenage girls in drab blue uniforms, half of them with their hair fully covered with scarves in the tradition of conservative Muslims.
The Jordanian Queen's exposed locks and frankly modern style are a sociopolitical statement, of course, advertising her conviction that the veil should be a matter of personal choice for Muslim women; Rania usually chooses not to. But she isn't here to lecture anybody about fashion or faith. She's marking the start of Human Rights Day at one of many events being held in schools across the Hashemite kingdom. The nationwide observance — unprecedented in an Arab world notorious for its violations of basic freedoms — was Rania's idea, just one of many modernizing notions she champions.
After greeting the students, Rania, 33, reads aloud a passage about the rights of women, drawn from the U.N.'s Universal Declaration of Human Rights. "Freedom means no discrimination on the basis of race, language, religion, politics or origin, with no differences between men and women," she says in a teacherly way. "Everyone is equal." To the Queen's delight, one of the girls responds by quoting the Prophet Muhammad on women's equality. Others throw up their hands in a competition to join in. Long after Rania has left, the girls still have stars in their eyes. "She talks to us about freedom, that nobody can take it away from us," beams Rula Nasser, 15. The 10th grader pauses for a moment, then adds: "She's amazing!"
No Western Queen or First Lady would get such a gushing review just for reading from a legal document. But in the Arab world, where most rulers' wives toe the conservative line in dress and demeanor, Rania is a rarity: a powerful woman who uses that power to push a progressive agenda. While other Arab consorts typically limit their public profile to the patronage of uncontroversial charities, Rania exercises her influence on hot-button issues that have brought her praise from modernists, criticism from traditionalists — and attention from well beyond the borders of tiny Jordan. "She's a mover and shaker," says one of the Arab press's leading commentators, Abdul Rahman al Rashid, columnist for the London-based Asharq al Awsat. "She's not a woman who wants media attention, but one who wants to deliver a program. It is not easy to change things, but she is making noise and delivering what she promises."
The secret to Rania's break-the-mold approach to the monarchy may be her background. She was not raised to be a Queen. Her parents are Palestinian — her father was a pediatrician — and she made her own way in Amman's middle class, working as a marketing executive for Apple Computer before meeting and marrying then Prince Abdullah in 1993. After becoming Queen in 1999 — five years ago this month — she turned into an international style icon (Giorgio Armani said she "has the body of a model and she holds herself like the Queen she is — what more could you want?"). But more recently she has evolved into someone altogether more formidable and hard to define. After a Dec. 26 earthquake reduced the Iranian town of Bam to rubble, she supervised the loading of relief supplies onto a Jordanian C-130 transport plane and then rode on it to Iran to comfort the victims. She's on the governing board of the World Economic Forum, the only Arab helping to steer that group of global political and business leaders. She and her husband, King Abdullah II, teamed up with the WEF and U.S. tech giant Cisco Systems to launch the Jordan Education Initiative, which brings Internet-enabled learning to the Middle East. Rania's favorite part of the project: Jordan's 10 Cisco Networking Academies, teaching high-tech skills to 600 students — almost two-thirds of them women. And next month, thanks to Rania's prodding, Arab satellite channels will begin broadcasting public-service ads aimed at boosting women's participation in public life.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #72  
Old 02-22-2005, 11:24 AM
Veram98's Avatar
Courtier
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: at different places, Germany
Posts: 676
Time Magazine II

Rania's most controversial work is done behind the scenes in Amman, where she has quietly lobbied the King and leading Jordanian politicians to institute social and political reforms, many of them aimed at improving the circumstances of women. Her promptings (in addition to artful persuasion, she nominated female candidates and provided résumés of their qualifications) helped lead to an unprecedented increase last year in the number of women in Jordanian politics. Now six seats are reserved for women in the newly elected 110-seat Chamber of Deputies. The King has also appointed seven women to the 55-seat Senate and included three women in his government's 21-member cabinet. "She comes and quite articulately pushes the case," says Abdullah. "She'll say, 'I'm just reminding you, if we are going to give women more of a role, for them to feel a stronger part of society, how about trying to push the envelope?'"
There's plenty of pushing left to be done. In a series of interviews with TIME, Rania described a Middle East where many women's lives remain hobbled by inequality: unable to find jobs, confined to their homes by patriarchal tradition, and, in extreme cases, losing their lives if simply suspected of sexual transgressions. "One of the main obstacles preventing the Arab world from advancing is the exclusion of women," she says. "Sometimes people ask, 'Do you have an agenda?' Yes, I do have a gender agenda. The more you include women, the more people will get used to the fact that, yes they are capable, yes they are part of the scene."
But the same traditions that suppress Arab women also place limits on what Rania, for all her power and enthusiasm, can achieve. Many of her modernizing initiatives have been slapped down by Jordan's conservative politicians. Last year, parliament rejected proposals she supported to equalize divorce rights and increase the marrying age of girls from 15 to 18. The Queen has also been frustrated in her campaign against "honor crimes," the term for the murder of women accused of dishonoring their families with sexual misconduct. Parliament refused to repeal sections of the Jordanian penal code that allow courts to show leniency to the perpetrators — usually male relatives of the victims. Rania has also tried and failed to persuade politicians to scrap a regulation that prevents Jordanian mothers from handing down citizenship, with its crucial access to state education and medical care, to their children.
Many Jordanian conservatives resent what they see as Rania's meddling in her husband's affairs, not only because she is a woman but also because she has Palestinian roots — her father fled the West Bank town of Tulkarm in 1967. Jordan's ruling élite comprises mainly East Bank Bedouins with strong connections to the Hashemite throne. "The regime's main supporters wonder about her," says one influential businessman. "Traditional men are not impressed by intelligent women. They are thinking, 'Who is this Palestinian coming to tell us how to run the country?'" Many Jordanians still talk about the 2002 football match where East Bankers chanted a message to Abdullah: "Divorce Her! Divorce Her!" (Ironically, Palestinians complain she has not adequately supported the intifadeh against Israel's occupation of the West Bank and Gaza Strip.)
The King hears the grumbling and is careful to point out who's in charge. "There's criticism in Amman that the Queen's calling the shots. That is not the case with Rania," he told Time. "There are boundaries she has never been able to cross." Abdullah also maintains that his wife's reformist urges mirror his own: "She is a reflection of me to some extent, and I of her." Despite that endorsement, however, Rania is "not oblivious to the problem of people perceiving her as being too influential," says an aide. "The question of being a liability is more precarious in a conservative country." As for the suspicions caused by her Palestinian origins, the Queen knows she may never be able to satisfy all of her husband's subjects: "There are certain people who will think I am not Jordanian enough," she shrugs, "and people who think I am not Palestinian enough."
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #73  
Old 02-22-2005, 11:29 AM
Veram98's Avatar
Courtier
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: at different places, Germany
Posts: 676
Time Magazine III

Officials close to the Queen say that the setbacks in parliament have taught her not to expect overnight success. "My disappointments," Rania says, "have stemmed mainly from my own impatience. [Reform] requires changes from within society. If society still believes that a woman's place is in the home, you are not going to get change." Even so, she is adamant that "now is the time to confront these issues."
She has already witnessed plenty of change. Rania al Yasin was born in Kuwait in August 1970, only a few days before Jordan's bloody Black September civil war, when Palestinian guerrillas tried to overthrow her future father-in-law. Her family remained in Kuwait until Saddam Hussein invaded the tiny oil sheikdom in 1990. The Yasins left and never went back. Rania earned a business degree from the American University in Cairo before joining her parents in Amman in 1991. She worked in marketing, first for Citibank, then for Apple. She caught the eye of Abdullah, oldest son of King Hussein and commander of Jordan's special forces, at a dinner party in 1992 and they married the following year.
She was not expected to become Queen. Hussein's deathbed decision to sack his brother Hassan, Crown Prince for 34 years, and make Abdullah his heir caught Rania — and all of Jordan — by surprise. "A whole new life and responsibility was suddenly placed on my shoulders," she recalls. "You start feeling insecure. You feel you have to prove yourself."
The conventional role of the Arab consort would have required her to confine herself to the raising of their children, Hussein and Iman, then aged 4 and 2 (their third, Salma, was born in 2000). Instead, the King asked her to brainstorm initiatives on human rights, women's rights, children's rights, education and health. Rania set up a separate office which now has a staff of 20, including researchers, speechwriters, schedulers and publicists, for the most part worldly young Jordanian women like herself. Although she rarely states her political positions in public, Abdullah says he frequently asks for her advice. "I come home at night, and I have a problem with education or health, and I need somebody to pick my brain," he says. "I'm so busy with everything else I need somebody to raise the flag, and in all the issues she is involved in she has been very successful in doing that."
If her pillow talk with Abdullah was political, Rania's early public profile was predictably centered on her looks and her wardrobe. There were comparisons to Jacqueline Kennedy and Diana, Princess of Wales, and she became a favorite of celebrity interviewers, gossip columnists, fashion magazines and paparazzi on both sides of the Atlantic. Inevitably, this led to criticism from Amman's salon society, where her fondness for designer dresses and expensive European vacations is viewed as inappropriate for a poor country squeezed between the conflicts in Palestine and Iraq. The gossips call her "the handbag Queen," and even serious commentators grumble about palace over-spending — including on Rania's Challenger jet. She calls the criticism "part of the turf," but adds: "If the gossip gets out of hand, I may have to look at myself and ask, Am I doing something wrong?"
That Challenger, incidentally, gets a lot of use: the Queen travels frequently, often to the West, where her glamorous persona elicits raves rather than criticism. She's also learned to use her celebrity to do some big-league networking. Shortly after Abdullah's coronation, she agreed to become a spokeswoman for the global microfinance movement, which seeks to empower Third World women by providing them with small business loans. She has since traveled the globe promoting the Washington-based Foundation of International Community Assistance, holding power lunches with women in Washington and Hollywood and delivering aid to women in battle zones like Kosovo. "Working with us in the trenches, you feel like she is one of our own from the ngo world," says finca policy director Lawrence Yanovitch. Bill Clinton recalls how at a charity event in Dubai she lassoed him into doing another in Jordan. "I needed another involvement like I needed a hole in the head," the former President told TIME. "But before I knew it, she had talked me into helping."
She fractured her leg last month while exercising, forcing her to miss the WEF's annual meeting in Davos. But she recalls the first time that she attended a meeting as the Forum's newest board member. Some of the titans of global business, nearly all of them men, were arrayed around the table. "I was terrified!" she says. She need not have been. At the meeting, recalls WEF president Klaus Schwab, the board found itself evenly divided on a controversial appointment until Rania, who had listened silently, raised some pointed questions that quickly clarified the best course of action. "The world's best CEOs hadn't thought of them," Schwab says. "It was her intuitive intelligence." These days, Rania is entirely at home in a room full of movers and shakers. When she was invited to address the pre-Davos Jidda Economic Forum in Saudi Arabia — where discrimination against women is so pervasive that they are barred from most occupations — she accepted enthusiastically. Aboard the Challenger on her way home from another address in Geneva, she and her aides discussed the speech she would deliver in Jidda. "They want me to talk about corporate responsibility, but that's a little passé," the Queen said slyly. "I'll try to talk about something a little more relevant." When the day came, she went to the podium wearing a white head scarf, a courteous nod to Saudi sensitivities. But her message was blunt: it was time her Arab sisters and brothers did it for themselves. "We must face up to hard truths," she said. "It will not help to wring our hands, point fingers or clench our fists. First, we must all participate." For women across the Arab world, it was a call to action from one of their own.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #74  
Old 02-22-2005, 11:38 AM
saloua's Avatar
Gentry
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: rabat, Morocco
Posts: 69
i love rania so mush i have seen her in tv. she look like queen of paradise
Attached Images
 
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #75  
Old 02-22-2005, 12:06 PM
Veram98's Avatar
Courtier
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: at different places, Germany
Posts: 676
Queen Rania in the list of TIME Magazine's 100 most influential people of 2004

Helping Tradition Meet Modernity

BY PATTY STONESIFER, co-chair and president, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
Apr. 26, 2004

It's a cold evening in February 2002, at a fancy dinner in New York City. In walks a drop-dead gorgeous thirtysomething. Senators, CEOs and others to whom deference does not come easily all rise to their feet. This is not just some successful businesswoman or famous actress. This is the Queen.
Queen Rania, the wife of Jordan's King Abdullah, has described the challenge to her country as trying to reconcile tradition with modernity. In Jordan, the issues she champions to bridge this gap include computer skills for schoolchildren, micro loans for women to start their own businesses, ending child abuse and trafficking and pushing for harsher penalties for honor killings. But I know her through her efforts on a larger world stage. Along with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and others, Rania is working to spread the modern gospel of childhood vaccination. As she noted that evening in 2002, more than 30 million children a year get no immunizations during their first year of life. And as many as 10% of them--from 2 million to 3 million--will die for the lack of just $30 worth of vaccinations.
The Vaccine Fund is an international effort to raise money to immunize children everywhere. So far, thanks at least in part to the Queen's strong endorsement and her role on the board of directors, it has raised $1.3 billion. The life-saving hepatitis-B vaccine has reached 35 million children in 40 of the least developed nations around the world.
The Queen always makes clear that she knows who wears the crown in Jordan. But she insists it is women who are the strongest force for modernization and its chief beneficiaries. Around the globe we watch her efforts with amazement and hope.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #76  
Old 03-10-2005, 01:39 AM
Balqis's Avatar
Nobility
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 319
Interview with Queen Rania on CNBC's Capital Report

October 16, 2003



And welcome back to CAPITAL REPORT. Her country is surrounded by violence and political upheaval, but Queen Rania of Jordan has gained a reputation as a broker for peace in the Middle East. Earlier today in an exclusive interview, we asked the queen about the UN Security Council's unanimous approval of the resolution on Iraq.

QUEEN RANIA AL-ABDULLAH (Jordan): Well, I really think that that's a very positive development, because I think it gives international legitimacy to the whole process in Iraq and brings the whole process into the international fold. And, you know, today I think all sides tried to put their differences aside and focus on the well-being and the best interests of the Iraqi people, and I think that that's a very positive development. I really think it will be received positive in our part of the world.

ALAN MURRAY, co-host:

I want to get back to Iraq in a minute, but first, let me ask you also about the other news this week. Three Americans killed in the Gaza Strip, apparently the targets of a bombing. I mean, this is something new, to have Americans targeted by Palestinians. Is it a sign of the anti-American sentiment in your part of the world? How do you interpret it?

QUEEN RANIA: It could be. I mean, really my hope is that this is an isolated event, and it's not going to be a trend where we're seeing American soldiers targeted unfairly like this. I was very saddened to hear this news. There is a feeling in our part of world, and I think in other places, of resentment towards the United States, and I think it's the result of misunderstanding of the policies.

However, having said that, I think the people in our part of the world are very sophisticated, multifaceted, complex people, and I think they separate between the policies and politic and the people. So although you have people in our part of the world who are against US policy, they actually are favorable towards the American people, and this is an opportunity to engage with the American people ...(unintelligible).

MURRAY: What will it take to turn that anti-American sentiment around?

QUEEN RANIA: I think communication is very, very important, dialogue, two-way dialogue, engagement with our part of the world. And as well as that, I think you need to have a very positive process taking place on the ground. We need progress. What's happened over the past few years is that there hasn't been any progress in the political field. The situation has been going from bad to worse, and that is always fertile ground for extremists. And as you can see, the extremists have been given an opportunity to really dominate the scene. And in order to try to come to, you know, neutralize them or to weaken them, we really need to have positive things happening on the ground, an improvement in people's lives.

BORGER: Turning back to Iraq for a moment, the Congress is right now talking about approving, and will approve probably, $87 billion for the rebuilding of Iraq after the war. There is a lot of controversy in the United States about it. Some members of the president's own party want some of that money to be a loan rather than a gift to Iraq. How important is this $87 billion, and will it possibly change the way people view America?

QUEEN RANIA: I believe it's very important, because I think it's required in order to finish the job. At the end of the day, what we want is a sovereign, independent, democratic Iraq. And in order to achieve that, we need to have security on the ground, we need to have the systems and institutions into place, and that's going to require a lot of money. You know, you're building from the bottom up. And leaving the job half finished, I think, will end up leaving a lot of resentment in our part of world, and I think that could be a danger.

MURRAY: Looking at the whole picture, do you think it was a good thing or a bad thing for United States to invade Iraq and remove Saddam Hussein?

QUEEN RANIA: Well, I think the most important thing is what the Iraqi people feel, and the majority of them are very happy to see that regime go. It was a very brutal regime. I think a lot of people were suffering for many, many years. At the same time, I don't think the Iraqi people are happy having an occupying force in their country. Now, I understand that the American troops do not want to be there longer than they have to be, but that has to be communicated to the Iraqi people. And I think what the Iraqi people are lacking at the moment is visibility into the future. They don't really know where they're heading, and I think that's always a very difficult thing for people. They need to know where their future lies. Also, there's a leadership vacuum, and I think as human beings, we all tend to congregate behind leaders. We need to be shown the way. And those two things are missing, and I think they need to be restored as soon as possible.

Part 2 follows in next message.


__________________
Reply With Quote
  #77  
Old 03-10-2005, 01:40 AM
Balqis's Avatar
Nobility
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 319
Interview with Queen Rania on CNBC's Capital Report Part 2

Continued...

BORGER: Do you think it would be important or helpful for the United States to say, 'This is the date when we will leave?'

QUEEN RANIA: It's, I think, unrealistic, but obviously it would be a very positive thing, because, as I said, people like to know what the end game is. In other words, if I knew that I am having to endure something and then this is when it's going to end, then it makes it easier for me to handle it. So, you know, having a road map, you know, with goal posts and signs always is very comforting for people.

MURRAY: But there's a conflict there as well, isn't there? I mean, on the one hand, everyone says, 'End the occupation as soon as possible.' On the other hand, they say, as you did, 'Finish the job, you know. Make sure that you leave a stable Iraq with systems up and running.' That may take time.

QUEEN RANIA: Right. And I think managing expectations is the most important thing, and that happens by having clear vision and communicating that vision in a very clear way to the people. I think this is the best way to handle that situation.

BORGER: Well, Ambassador Bremer is obviously over there. He has a very difficult job, as everybody knows. There is now a cabinet over there in place. You talk about leadership. Where will the leadership come from?

QUEEN RANIA: It has to come from the people themselves, and it has to have--I know that the Iraqi people are divide along ethnic and political and cultural divides. But I think at the end of the day, the people--the leaders who are going to be selected have to have approval from the majority of the Iraqi people. They have to have credibility, and they have to have the popularity from the people.

MURRAY: I want to go back to this anti-American and even anti-Western sentiment in the region that you were talking about earlier, because you're obviously somebody who is trying to bridge that gap. You're here encouraging investment in your region. You were in New York opening an exhibit that's designed to encourage cultural interaction. Does that put you in a difficult position, you and your husband in a difficult position in the region, that you're seen as being too close to the United States perhaps?

QUEEN RANIA: Well, some people might view it that way, but the way we see it is that, you know, we've had very strong ties with the United States for a very long time. These are historic ties. And we believe in this relationship, and we value it very much, and we believe that it's very important for us to bridge these divides, because it's not safe for our world if we keep having these differences. As you saw, you know, people tend to use these kinds of sentiments to bring about extremism which can then translate into terrorism, and this represents a danger to all our world. So I think as much dialogue as we can have, as much as we can bridge these gaps, the better it will be for everyone.

BORGER: But there is some cost to the king's popularity, for example, and perhaps even to your own for being pro-Western, I would presume, right?

QUEEN RANIA: Well, I don't see us as being pro-Western. I think we are, you know, following the policy that we believe in. And, you know, it's always normal that you might have people who disagree with you, but I don't think it's a pro-Western policy. I think it's what is in the best interests of both our countries.

MURRAY: One of the causes you've taken up at home is combating these honor killing which, as I understand it, are situations where men kill women, maybe their relatives, their spouses for immoral behavior. Are you making progress on that?

QUEEN RANIA: Slowly, but surely. I think, you know, when it comes to changing these kinds of things, on the one hand you want to change some of the laws. On the other hand, it's even more important to change some of the perceptions and social attitudes, and those take a long time to happen. You need to start from the bottom up. You need to have educational awareness campaigns. You need to enlist leaders in society to talk to people about this issue. But we are very committed to eradicating this practice. Let me say that as much as something that happens in Jordan, it happens in many countries of the world, sometimes under a different label like crimes of passion, but I believe that the world has a long way to go for combating this issue of violence against women.

BORGER: Well, there is a story recently of an Iraqi exile, for example, who slit his own 16-year-old daughter's throat because he thought she had behaved in some kind of immoral way. You have tried to go to your legislature to get the "light" sentences for these kinds of crimes reduced, and you lost.

QUEEN RANIA: This is part of the process, you know. This is when you have a democracy and an elected parliament, sometimes, you know, they disagree on these kinds of issues. And I think the result--this disagreement comes as a result of ignorance of the issue. People don't necessarily understand what crimes of honor actually mean. And they don't understand that it's against our religion, that there is no honor in taking the law in your own hands, and that's something we have to communicate to the people.

MURRAY: And do you feel like you're making progress on that?

QUEEN RANIA: Slowly, but, you know, as long as we're committed, I think in the end, we will take care of this issue. We're very committed to that.

BORGER: Well, your majesty, thanks so much for being with us.

QUEEN RANIA: It was a pleasure.

MURRAY: Thank you.

QUEEN RANIA: Thank you very much. Thank you.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #78  
Old 03-10-2005, 01:43 AM
Balqis's Avatar
Nobility
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 319
Speech at the World Economic Forum 2003

January 27, 2003, Davos, Switzerland


Thank you, Professor Schwab [Klaus Schwab, president of the World Economic Forum]. And thank you all for your warm welcome. It is an honour to be here.
This session is called a dialogue, and I hope and believe it will be a dialogue — a chance to begin a real conversation.

You know, when I open my e-mail, sometimes I'll get an alert window that says, “the message sender has requested a response.” Well, to the extent that I have a message today, this message sender hopes that all of you will respond. And not only here and now, with me. But in the days and months ahead, with the people of my region — Jordanians and Arabs, many of them young and optimistic. They are looking for a new, two-way dialogue with the people of the world.

It goes without saying that ours is a critical time. Not simply in terms of global security, or politics, or economics. It is a critical time in terms of ideas; the basic ideas on which this century builds its promise — ideas like: Peace with justice; equal opportunity; and tolerance for others.

These values are goals, certainly — ideals to aim for, in the best of worlds. But let me suggest that today, peace, opportunity, and tolerance are more than goals. They are also resources — essential elements of our increasingly global system. They drive 21st century success no less than energy or technology. In that sense, peace and opportunity and tolerance are not a luxury, not the final icing on the cake — they are the very bread of life, the fuel that is needed, right now, for a safe, free, and prosperous world.

So, we need to ask ourselves — as a global community, have we invested sufficiently in these resources? And most of all, what are we doing to build trust in our values, to make them something on which all people can rely?

To me, these questions are made very urgent by the “hope gap” that I have seen around the globe — the dangerous gulf, between those people who really feel part of this new century, and the many, far too many, who feel left behind.

I have also been struck by the Forum's interesting new survey on global trust. As we've learned, the survey finds that trust in key institutions has fallen to critical levels all over the world.

The survey speaks of trust in institutions. Yet what may be most at risk is trust in the values those organisations are supposed to represent.

Think about a boy in the West Bank who powers on a computer and looks through a virtual window onto a world of peace and prosperity. Then he looks out his own window at barricades and violence and closed streets. And this goes on year after year. What's at risk for that child and other children, on both sides of this conflict, is trust that peace can ever be real. That is an attitude they will carry into adult life, if we don't make a difference now.

Or think about a young girl in Afghanistan who can finally go to school after years of exclusion. Then the school door slams shut — because there are no funds for books or teachers or technology. What's at risk for this child, and many others, is real hope in the opportunity to share in this century. Again, that's an outlook that can shape their lives for years to come.

“Hope gaps” like these are found in various ways, in too many places around the world. Is there any doubt that these are the populations most vulnerable to those who teach despair, hatred and violence?

People who are trapped by failed hopes can easily become disillusioned and cynical about values like peace and tolerance. And cynicism is contagious; it can also affect those looking from the outside in and diminish their will to make ours a better world. Yet humanity's greatest message may be that contrary to the cynics, trust in core values does pay off.

This is something that we in Jordan really understand. We are a small country — resource-poor — hemmed in by some of the world's most bitter conflicts. Development, education, health, economic growth — all these are huge challenges. In today's climate, with the Palestinian-Israeli conflict raging to our west, and a potential war looming to our east, it might seem easy to write us off. Indeed, it might seem easy for Jordanians to be cynical about their prospects, to shift to low gear, to lay low, to put off our crucial reform plans until the political storms around us subside.

Instead, under the leadership of His Majesty King Abdullah, we have pushed forward an accelerated model of achievement and excellence. We have decided to strengthen our trust in age-old values of hard work, peace, and equal opportunity. More importantly, we have decided not to throw in the towel come what may.

This is the genius of Jordan, and it is beginning to pay off. We see that in economic growth — over 5 per cent in 2002; we see that in all our leading indicators such as productivity, cash reserves, and exports. But we also see it in terms of attitude and confidence. Allow me to quote a recent newsletter published by a leading investment bank in Jordan — “investors at the Amman Stock Exchange (ASE) still seem unfazed by political news, which hampered their activity in 2002, and are now trading quite enthusiastically.”

Ours is a leadership that devotes all its energy to make hope real, and in my journeys around the world, I have seen that same spirit in many places. Especially here at Davos, I meet winners in every sphere, who have the gift of making their ideas and values come to life. I believe that we now have a challenge, and an opportunity, to help millions around the world make their hopes real.

One important challenge is to bring our values to bear on one of the worst “hope gaps” in the world: The gap between regions that have enjoyed the benefits of peace, and those that are paying the terrible price of ongoing violence and conflict. If we are going to fuel new realities, we need to find a way to flow hope across this divide.

Today, just as a pipeline connects areas rich in resources like oil or water, with areas that lack these essential resources, a “peaceline” is needed to bring the benefits of peace to regions in conflict. That means, for example, flowing more investment — or perhaps I should say, more creative investment — into war-tired communities. New, public-private partnerships can be a seedbed to grow civil society. A global commitment to opening the school doors can open minds as well. And innovative outreach, like microfinance, can bring solutions to the street. In Kosovo, I visited communities being rebuilt by war survivors, many of them women, using loans as small as $100. This work has the power to transform lives.

Perhaps most of all, a “peaceline” means streaming a new dialogue of tolerance and mutual respect, one that understands we all have a stake in the global system. The West-Islamic World Dialogue that has begun at this Forum is a major contribution. I thank Professor Schwab for his sincere efforts in making this important dialogue a reality.

The idea of a “peaceline” is just one way to think about the deep connections among us. Truly, global peace isn't something that we will get by turning on a tap. We will have to work for it, drill deep, and keep the ideas and hope flowing. The well of human creativity and capability is never empty. The resources of peace, of opportunity, of tolerance, are there.

I learned that best from the life of my father-in-law, His Late Majesty, King Hussein. He reigned for 47 years and had basically seen it all — the rise and fall of nations, the dramatic shift in alliances, the demise of great leaders. He worked for peace for several decades. Every ounce of success was weighed down by tonnes of disappointments. He had every right to be cynical about the prospects of peace. Indeed, he would have been forgiven if he had relabelled cynicism and called it realism. But he chose not to.

In the last months of his life, the Arab-Israeli peace process had again stalled in violence. At that time, King Hussein was being treated for advanced cancer. Instinctively, he left the cancer unit, and went back to work for peace at the Wye River Conference. He attended, if you recall, the White House ceremony announcing an agreement. He looked frail from his battle with cancer, but his eyes foretold a story of a moral passion that will live on long after his death.

And, indeed, ours is a better world because people can still trust his values. King Hussein taught me, and millions of others, that in the pursuit of basic values, such as peace and freedom, we can never fail. We just have to keep the hope alive, continue the dialogue, and top it all up with plenty of hard work.

Thank you very much.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #79  
Old 03-10-2005, 07:01 AM
Monalisa's Avatar
Courtier
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Namur, Belgium
Posts: 747
Hi balqis,it seems that you have all interviews and speechs gaven by Q.Rania, i'm interested in the interview gaven to Catherine Ceylac:"Thé ou café" for the french TV "France2" in November 2002,can you post it,i have some questions about!
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #80  
Old 03-10-2005, 11:47 PM
Balqis's Avatar
Nobility
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monalisa
Hi balqis,it seems that you have all interviews and speechs gaven by Q.Rania, i'm interested in the interview gaven to Catherine Ceylac:"Thé ou café" for the french TV "France2" in November 2002,can you post it,i have some questions about!
Sorry, Monalisa :(

I don't have anything from French TV. The only French interview with Queen Rania I have is the one that appeared in Paris Match in November 2001.

I hope you find it. I'd be interested to see it too :)
__________________

__________________
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Queen Margrethe's New Years Speeches Josefine Queen Margrethe II and Prince Henrik 51 01-02-2014 05:28 AM
King Hussein: Articles, Interviews & Speeches maryshawn Royal House of Jordan 42 10-02-2013 05:29 PM
Queen Noor: Magazines, Articles, Interviews, Speeches & TV appearances Jacqueline Royal House of Jordan 198 09-18-2013 08:26 AM
Royal Family of Morocco: Articles, Interviews & Speeches Jacqueline Royal Family of Morocco 99 01-10-2011 08:06 PM
Interviews & Speeches - Princess Caroline ally_cooper Princess Caroline and Family 93 11-27-2009 05:23 PM




Additional Links
Popular Tags
abdication birth charlene crown prince frederik crown prince haakon crown princess letizia crown princess mary crown princess mette-marit duchess of cambridge dutch royal history engagement fashion genealogy grand duchess maria teresa grand duke henri hohenzollern infanta leonor infanta sofia jewellery jordan king abdullah ii king carl xvi gustav king constantine ii king felipe king felipe vi king harald king juan carlos king philippe king willem-alexander luxembourg olympic games olympics ottoman picture of the month pom prince albert prince albert ii prince carl philip prince felipe prince floris prince maurits prince pieter-christiaan princess aimee princess anita princess astrid princess beatrix princess charlene princess claire princess laurentien princess letizia princess mabel princess madeleine princess marilene princess mary queen anne-marie queen letizia queen mathilde queen maxima queen rania queen silvia royal royal fashion russia sofia hellqvist spain state visit the hague visit wedding winter olympics 2014



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:04 AM.

Social Knowledge Networks

eXTReMe Tracker
Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2014
Jelsoft Enterprises

Royal News Delivered to your Email!

You can get the latest Royal News right in your inbox.

unsusbcribe at anytime with one click

Close [X]